Thomas Jay Ryan

Thomas Jay Ryan

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Thomas Jay Ryan - Shots from the after party for the opening night of 'A Month In the Country' which was held at the CSC Theatre in New York, New York, United States - Friday 30th January 2015

Thomas Jay Ryan

Thomas Jay Ryan - Opening night of 'Buyer and Cellar' at the Rattlestick Playwrights Theater - Arrivals - New York City, United States - Wednesday 3rd April 2013

Thomas Jay Ryan
Thomas Jay Ryan

Laila Robbins, Edward Albee, Jane Alexander and Thomas Jay Ryan - Peter Francis James, Catherine Curtin, Laila Robbins, Jane Alexander, Edward Albee, C.J. Wilson, Tricia Paoluccio, Thomas Jay Ryan and Michael Hayden Monday 5th March 2012 Opening night after party for 'The Lady From Dubuque' at Signature Theatre Company’s Pershing Square Signature Center - Arrivals

Laila Robbins, Edward Albee, Jane Alexander and Thomas Jay Ryan
Laila Robbins
Laila Robbins
Laila Robbins

Thomas Jay Ryan and Michael Urie - Thomas Jay Ryan and Michael Urie New York City, USA - Photocall for the play 'The Temperamentals' held at Pearl Studios Thursday 4th February 2010

Thomas Jay Ryan and Michael Urie
Thomas Jay Ryan and Michael Urie
Thomas Jay Ryan and Michael Urie

Dream Boy Review


Good
With this evocative drama, filmmaker Bolton (Eban and Charley) tackles deep-seated prejudice in the American South. It's somewhat overwrought dramatically, and the themes are a little vague, but it's strikingly well shot and acted.

Nathan (Bender) is a new kid in a rural town, living with his deeply religious parents (Scarwid and Ryan). He catches the eye of his neighbour Roy (Roeg), a classmate who helps him adjust to his new school, and while doing homework together they discover a mutual attraction, which they of course have to keep hidden in such a church-going community. And there are other issues in Nathan's life, including parental abuse and bullying from two of Roy's friends (Wayne and Beckman).

Continue reading: Dream Boy Review

Fay Grim Review


Weak
Roughly ten years after cementing his place as an offbeat indie favorite, Hal Hartley revisits the characters that put him there. His 1997 Henry Fool, a screenplay-award winner at Cannes, introduced us to lonely garbage man Simon Grim, his horny sister Fay, and the titular character that drastically changes their lives. Hartley brings them back with Fay Grim, but the "where are they now?" fun wears thin quickly.

Part of the problem is Hartley's distinct style, which, if you're a fan, you already know well. Characters often speak slowly, pausing pensively for dramatic or comedic effect. Conversations -- and camera angles -- are unexpectedly funny and skewed, dabbling in established genres. When this approach has purpose or emotion (as in Henry Fool), it works. When it runs in circles, as in the second-half of Fay Grim, it exists only for the "art" and can be annoying as hell.

Continue reading: Fay Grim Review

Dischord Review


Good
This serial killer story is interlaced with an identity crisis between a married couple who are major music artists. It is also a flawed but ultimately worthwhile first directorial effort made on a shoestring budget that has earned top awards on the festival circuit.

Gypsy (Annunziata Gianzero), a beautiful alternative rock violinist achieving worldwide recognition, abandons her international tour in order to retire with her acclaimed composer husband Lucian (Andrew Borba) to their beachside retreat off Cape Cod, where he will begin work on a follow-up album to his recent hit. What lurks in the background of Gypsy's insistence to her agents and bookers that "I don't play anymore" is the nagging competitiveness between the marriage partners concerning just how much of her influence contributed to his success. Rather than argue the issue, she sacrifices her career for the sake of her marriage, unwilling to claim such a contribution. But the discord (or "dischord") is an insistent murmur, an emotional leitmotif.

Continue reading: Dischord Review

Henry Fool Review


Weak
Like a French New Wave director, Hal Hartley has always embraced the world of the second-rate. Setting many of his films in a second-rate city (Hoboken, New Jersey) and tracking the lives of second-rate folks has gotten a lot of mileage in the indie circuit - and deservedly so, with small, vignette-like films like Simple Men and The Unbelievable Truth. Henry Fool is still one of his most ambitious movies - a serio-comic art piece that at least acknowledges the outside world - but it's deeply flawed. The script is full of promises that the movie fails to deliver, and few in the cast seem quite sure when and if they're supposed to be funny, earnest, or both. Hartley painted himself into a corner with this one, though he does use interesting paint.

The story turns mainly on the relationship between Queens garbage man Simon Grim (James Urbaniak) and Henry Fool (Thomas Jay Ryan), a pretentious aesthete who drifts into Grim's life. Fool is thoroughly unlikeable - Ryan plays him as greasy, chain-smoking poseur, acting smarter than he actually is - but Simon clearly need somebody in his life. He's friendless, antisocial, and living with his mother and sister, who routinely berate him as retarded. Fool blathers on out his memoirs and opines about the difficult life of a genius ("An honest man is always in trouble," he opines), but he also encourages Simon to start writing himself. For Simon, that counts as friendship enough.

Continue reading: Henry Fool Review

The Book Of Life Review


Excellent
After six feature films shot with the same "too hip to smile" minimalist approach, critic's darling Hal Hartley really needed to shake things up. Shot on hand-held digital video as part of the France Collection 2000 series, The Book of Life is that project, a shaggy dog guffaw at the end of the millennium.

Miles away from what we critics enjoy referring to as "visually austere" (i.e., static shots with careful compositions), The Book of Life throws caution to the wind. Working with new cinematographer Jim Denault (Boys Don't Cry) instead of old standby Michael Spiller (Trust), Hartley spins and fusses in colorful blurred abstractions, creating a dreamy, impressionistic look with none of his trademark hard edges. Look, ma -- no hands!

Continue reading: The Book Of Life Review

Teknolust Review


Terrible

A silly cybersexual fantasy hinged on the fetishistic sci-fi gimmick of replicant women who need sperm to survive, "Teknolust" isn't much better than what it sounds like -- a porn spoof. The fact that writer-director Lynn Hershman Leeson genuinely considers this concept a high-minded metaphor makes the eccentric comedy laughable in ways that were certainly never intended.

A low-budget, one-dimensional concoction with art-house pretensions, the film employs such "futuristic" trappings as two-year-old candy-colored iBooks and a brushed-steel microwave that doubles as a computer terminal. But while its shoestring style may have come of necessity, the movie's absurdly ineffectual intellectualism and that-take-will-have-to-do performances are what really makes it hard to sit through.

Odd-bird indie icon Tilda Swinton ("The Deep End," "Orlando") stars a nerdy-virgin microbiologist with the ridiculous name of Dr. Rosetta Stone. Swinton also plays Stone's home-made clones, the clumsily sultry Ruby (who always wears red), petulant, child-like Marine (blue) and shy, cerebral Olive (green) -- the first of whom has been trained, through watching old movies, to go out and seduce men with bad pick-up lines so she can bring life-giving sperm home to her sisters. (That the injections are given intravenously is all that keeps "Teknolust" from being even more ill conceived than it already is.)

Continue reading: Teknolust Review

Thomas Jay Ryan

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Benedict Cumberbatch Joins David Gilmour Onstage For 'Comfortably Numb'

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The 'Sherlock' and 'Doctor Strange' star joined Gilmour onstage at the Royal Albert Hall for a rendition of the Pink Floyd classic.

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Thomas Jay Ryan Movies

Fay Grim Movie Review

Fay Grim Movie Review

Roughly ten years after cementing his place as an offbeat indie favorite, Hal Hartley revisits...

Dischord Movie Review

Dischord Movie Review

This serial killer story is interlaced with an identity crisis between a married couple who...

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The Book of Life Movie Review

The Book of Life Movie Review

After six feature films shot with the same "too hip to smile" minimalist approach, critic's...

Teknolust Movie Review

Teknolust Movie Review

A silly cybersexual fantasy hinged on the fetishistic sci-fi gimmick of replicant women who need...

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