Thierry Lhermitte

Thierry Lhermitte

Thierry Lhermitte Quick Links

Pictures Film Comments RSS

Thierry Lhermitte - Sunday 18th May 2008 at Cannes Film Festival Cannes, France

Thierry Lhermitte
Thierry Lhermitte

Le Divorce Review


Good
Two American blondes discover the joys of Paris - love, heartache, and wearing scarves in a multitude of ways. The blondes are the Walker sisters of California, Roxy (Naomi Watts) and Isabel (Kate Hudson). As Le Divorce opens, Isabel has just arrived in Paris to stay with Roxy and help her out in the late stages of her pregnancy. As luck would have it, Isabel shows up just as Roxy's husband, Charles-Henri (Melvil Poupaud) is walking out on her and their young daughter. The highly moralistic Roxy refuses to give Charles-Henri a divorce, instigating a battle with his extensive, wealthy family, which is lorded over with queenly arrogance by his mother, Suzanne de Persand (Leslie Caron).

The conflict between the Walker and de Persand clans is meant to be only the backdrop for the film's marquee star, Kate Hudson, to strut her naïve self around Paris and fall in lust with Charles-Henri's uncle, the much-older Edgar (Thierry Lhermitte), a suave TV commentator. But it is this familial battleground that quickly becomes the more engaging storyline, especially after Roxy and Isabel's parents (Sam Waterston and Stockard Channing) fly in from California to help out in the negotiations. Waterston and Channing play their roles with effortless grace, establishing that they've been comfortably married for years by using only the slightest of gestures.

Continue reading: Le Divorce Review

The Dinner Game Review


Very Good
French farce as it's rarely done these days -- well. The Dinner Game presents the straigtforward tale of a wealthy publisher who attends a weekly "idiot dinner," with the prize going to the guest who brings with him the biggest fool. Pierre (Lhermitte) is sure he's going to win with François (Villeret) -- only they never actually make it to the dinner because Pierre hurts his back. The idiot becomes an unwanted guest in his home, and before we know it, Pierre's life is almost ruined thanks to François's stupidity and naïveté. There's a moral to the story that I won't ruin, but The Dinner Game is raucously funny despite its smallness. An excellent way to spend a free hour and change.

Continue reading: The Dinner Game Review

And Now... Ladies And Gentlemen Review


Good
He's a jewel thief that uses clever disguises to make off with millions in diamonds with every daylight heist and wants to get out of the business.

She's a jazz singer depressed by the weight of her past.

Continue reading: And Now... Ladies And Gentlemen Review

The Closet (Le Placard) Review


Very Good

Although Francis Veber's "The Closet" is billed as a comedy, it's not clear at first what sense of humor it might have. The prolific French director has been known to make screwball comedies ("Le jouet"), social commentary comedies ("La cage aux folles") and even cruel, dark comedies ("Le diner des cons," aka "The Dinner Game").

Since "The Closet" is about a miserably-divorced, middle-aged, middle-management sad sack (Daniel Auteuil), all the early indicators pointed to it being one of those melancholy, sad-clown French comedies that have a tendency to become quickly tiresome.

Auteuil wakes up the morning after learning he's about to be fired and stares dejectedly out his large kitchen window like nothing more could go wrong in his life.

Continue reading: The Closet (Le Placard) Review

Le Divorce Review


Bad

The further away director James Ivory and producer Ishmael Merchant get from their trademarked aristocratic period pieces, like "A Room With a View" and "Howard's End," the worse their movies get. At this point, I fully expect their next film to be a futuristic sci-fi chamber drama, because that's the only way they could sink lower than "Le Divorce."

A pseudo-sophisticated sexual roundelay full of trivial characters so selfish it's a chore to spend two hours with them, this is the story of two American sisters suffering the slings and arrows of French male infidelity -- but even these women served up as the movie's heroines are worthy of very little sympathy.

Naomi Watts plays Roxy, an insecure doormat of a pregnant poetess in present-day Paris, who is in shock at the departure of Charles-Henri (Melvil Poupaud), her philandering husband who has taken up with a married Russian dancer. Just arrived from Santa Monica, her supposedly self-possessed younger sibling Isabel (Kate Hudson) is appalled at Roxy's plight -- although that doesn't stop the little hypocrite from becoming the throwaway mistress of the cheater's Uncle Edgar (Thierry Lhermitte), an arrogant right-wing politician.

Continue reading: Le Divorce Review

The Dinner Game Review


OK

Maybe it's a cultural thing, but I just don't find Francis Veber's brand of French farce all that funny. "La Cage aux Folles"? Feh. "Le Jouet"? Nice try. "Les Comperes"? Whatever.

But then again, I think the American remakes of these movies -- "The Birdcage," "The Toy" and "Father's Day," respectively -- are considerably worse.

"The Dinner Game" seems to be more of the same. The writer-director's new effort is about a club of Parisian yuppie socialites who gather monthly for a dinner at which they compete to see who can bring the biggest idiot.

Continue reading: The Dinner Game Review

Thierry Lhermitte

Thierry Lhermitte Quick Links

Pictures Film Comments RSS
Advertisement

Occupation

Actor


Thierry Lhermitte Movies

Le Divorce Movie Review

Le Divorce Movie Review

Two American blondes discover the joys of Paris - love, heartache, and wearing scarves in...

The Closet (Le Placard) Movie Review

The Closet (Le Placard) Movie Review

Although Francis Veber's "The Closet" is billed as a comedy, it's not clear at first...

Le Divorce Movie Review

Le Divorce Movie Review

The further away director James Ivory and producer Ishmael Merchant get from their trademarked aristocratic...

The Dinner Game Movie Review

The Dinner Game Movie Review

Maybe it's a cultural thing, but I just don't find Francis Veber's brand of French...

Artists
Actors
    Filmmakers
      Artists
      Bands
        Musicians
          Artists
          Celebrities
             
              Artists
              Interviews
                musicians & bands in the news
                  actors & filmmakers in the news
                    celebrities in the news

                      Go Back in Time using our News archive to see what happened on a particular day in the past.