Raising the question, why do they call them "war games ," the Defense Department's pointman for the movie business has indicated that the Pentagon bailed on Disney/Marvel's The Avengers because it just wasn't realistic enough. In an interview with Wired magazine, Phil Strub remarked, "We couldn't reconcile the unreality of this international organization and our place in it. ... To whom did S.H.I.E.L.D. answer? Did we work for S.H.I.E.L.D.? We hit that roadblock and decided we couldn't do anything" to participate in the film. In reporting on the Pentagon's decision, Wired observed that S.H.I.E.L.D. has had an ambiguous history. "If it's an American governmental agency, what kind of constitutional authority does it exercise over the military? If it's an international body, as the movie text suggests and Strub determined, are U.S. military personnel and equipment on loan to it through some kind of United Nations Security Council resolution? The questions may seem picayune, but they're precisely the stuff that can cause an image-conscious military to yank its cooperation from a movie." But the real question may be, does anyone in the audience give a hoot?