Terry George

Terry George

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Terry George - Terry George and daughter, Oorlagh George Friday 9th March 2012 pose with their Academy Award in the category of 'Best Live Action Short' for the 'The Shore' at Today FM

Terry George
Terry George
Terry George

Terry George - Filmmakers Oorlagh George and Terry George Sunday 26th February 2012 2012 Vanity Fair Oscar Party at Sunset Tower Hotel - Arrivals

Terry George

Maya Rudolph, Kristen Wiig, Terry George, Academy Of Motion Pictures And Sciences and Academy Awards - Maya Rudolph, Oorlagh George, Terry George and Kristen Wiig Sunday 26th February 2012 84th Annual Academy Awards (Oscars) held at the Kodak Theatre - Press Room

Maya Rudolph, Kristen Wiig, Terry George, Academy Of Motion Pictures And Sciences and Academy Awards
Maya Rudolph, Kristen Wiig, Academy Of Motion Pictures And Sciences and Academy Awards
Maya Rudolph, Kristen Wiig, Academy Of Motion Pictures And Sciences and Academy Awards
Maya Rudolph, Academy Of Motion Pictures And Sciences and Academy Awards
Maya Rudolph, Academy Of Motion Pictures And Sciences and Academy Awards

Terry George and Academy Awards Thursday 23rd February 2012 US-Ireland Alliance Oscar Wilde Pre-Academy Awards party honoring nominees John Logan, Melissa McCarthy and Michelle Williams

Terry George and Academy Awards

Reservation Road Review


Weak
Director Terry George moves swiftly from an African tragedy to an American tragedy with his docile Reservation Road. Adapted from John Burnham Schwartz's novel by George and Schwartz, a hit-and-run accident on the titular length of blacktop becomes a catalyst for a study of grief and anxiety in two American families.

Road opens as Ethan Lerner (Joaquin Phoenix) and his wife Grace (Jennifer Connelly) watch their son Josh play cello in the school orchestra on a breezy fall evening. At the same time, Dwight Arno (Mark Ruffalo) and his son Lucas are enjoying a hot dog and a Red Sox game in overtime at Fenway Park. But his team's successful step towards reversing the curse doesn't alleviate Dwight's worry about getting Lucas back to his mother (Mira Sorvino) on time. While speeding home, Dwight accidentally swerves and hits Josh as the boy is letting some fireflies go outside of a gas station. And Dwight runs.

Continue reading: Reservation Road Review

Terry George - Wednesday 9th May 2007 at Buddha Bar New York City, USA

Terry George

Hart's War Review


Extraordinary
I must admit I had preconceived notions regarding Hart's War. I was expecting to see a blood-and-guts WWII P.O.W. flick with Bruce Willis kicking Nazi butt, just like Audie Murphy. Instead, I was pleasantly surprised by this strange mixture of The Verdict and The Great Escape that delivers on all fronts, with a cunning script, great acting, and subtle directing.

The story resembles one of those studio pictures of the 1940s and 1950s made famous by the likes of William Holden and Gary Cooper. Willis plays Col. William McNamara, the highest-ranking officer in German prisoner camp Stalag IV during the tail end of the WWII. McNamara retains the dignity of his fellow American soldiers held captive and silently plans to strike back against the enemy under the suspicious eyes of German Col. Werner Visser (Marcel Iures). When a murder occurs in the camp, McNamara sets in motion a plan of attack against his German counterparts by orchestrating a court martial headed by Lt. Tommy Hart (Colin Farrell), an Army desk jockey with a senator for a father who was recently captured in Belgium. As the tensions mount and sides are taken, both friend and foe uncover duplicities within their own ranks, values of lives are weighed against the duties of soldiers, and the question of honor versus freedom plays out to the final whopper of an ending.

Continue reading: Hart's War Review

The Boxer Review


Very Good
What kind of boxer doesn't have a killer instinct? Well, after 14 years in prison for IRA-related crimes, you might lose your taste for violence too. And that's exactly what Daniel Day-Lewis's Boxer does -- he can't finish a fight, and when called upon by his old IRA buddies, he can't work for them either. This gets our Irish friend in a heap of trouble, making for a reasonably good movie, no matter how creepy Emily Watson is. (Which is to say: pretty damn creepy.)

Hotel Rwanda Review


Very Good

In 1994 an attempted genocide in Rwanda left over 1 million dead. The response of the international community was tepid, at best. The response of one hotel manager, however, was heroic. Hotel Rwanda tells his story with some insight, but perhaps too much restraint.

As the film begins, two tribes are at war. A Hutu majority faces a Tutsi insurgence. A disembodied voice on the radio fans the flames of hate, instigating Hutu violence against anyone even suspected of being Tutsi. None of this seems to affect Paul Rusesabagina (Don Cheadle), a hotelier at the posh Hotel Mille Collines, which caters to European tourists and the local military elite. He keeps politics at arms' length, using his charm and skill with negotiation to please his clients and superiors. Whatever pull he has is kept in reserve for when he might need it for his own family in the future. This is especially important since, while he is Hutu, his wife Tatiana (an impeccable Sophie Okonedo) is Tutsi.

All of that changes once a coup replaces the moderate president with a Tutsi-hating junta leading an increasingly uncontrollable militia bent on genocide. Paul must hide his Tutsi relatives and friends in his hotel while the UN stands guard outside. As the situation worsens, his negotiating prowess must serve over 800 refugees, all of whom are only a favor or payoff away from execution.

Don Cheadle is outstanding as Paul, at first depicting his quiet ease as a businessman, then his desperation as everything he takes for granted begins to crumble. The moment comes when Paul realizes who his real friends aren't, and Cheadle's performance resonates the horror of what Paul has become and how completely he's been deceived. This, in turn, makes Paul's conviction all the more believable when he chooses to use his skills, at great risk to himself and others, to save as many Rwandans as possible.

Also serving well in a small but memorable role is Joaquin Phoenix, as a photographer who captures footage of the atrocities while recognizing the ultimate futility of their broadcast. "If people see this they'll say 'Oh, my God. That's horrible,'" he explains to Paul, "Then they go on eating their dinners." Nick Nolte makes a nice turn as a compassionate, but ultimately impotent UN peacekeeper. He points out just how little Paul and his people mean to the rest of the world. "You're not even a nigger," he tells him, "You're an African."

One of the things the film does very effectively is in pointing out the disconnect between the horrors taking place in Africa and the response of the world community. Paul tells his refugee residents that they must "shame" the world into taking action. Rwanda seems to be nothing more than an investment or a tourist destination to the powers that be. This is captured perfectly when, as the European guests of the hotel are evacuated and the Rwandans are left behind, a man on the exiting bus snaps a photo.

What the film doesn't do quite as effectively is capture the visceral horror of the event. It's very difficult to do a PG-13 film about genocide. To some extent, director Terry George pulls it off. The psychological strain is evident in Cheadle's performance and in the fear evoked in his guests by each new threat. But this is one of those rare cases where it seems the presentation isn't violent enough. It feels like the blow has been softened, and this is one punch that should not be pulled. In effect, the audience feels like they're being given the tourist version of the massacre instead of the real thing. Adding to this watered-down effect is the dialogue, which occasionally lapses into movie-of-the-week caliber. The story here is stronger than the actual screenplay, which is too bad, since this is a tale that deserves to be told with as much impact as possible.

The DVD includes two documentaries about the film and the massacre, plus commentaries from various players (including selected comments from Cheadle).

You must be at least this tall to participate in the junta.

Terry George

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Terry George Movies

Reservation Road Movie Review

Reservation Road Movie Review

Director Terry George moves swiftly from an African tragedy to an American tragedy with his...

Hart's War Movie Review

Hart's War Movie Review

I must admit I had preconceived notions regarding Hart's War. I was expecting to...

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Hotel Rwanda Movie Review

Hotel Rwanda Movie Review

In 1994 an attempted genocide in Rwanda left over 1 million dead. The response of...

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