Terrence Dashon Howard

Terrence Dashon Howard

Terrence Dashon Howard Quick Links

Film RSS

Hart's War Review


Extraordinary
I must admit I had preconceived notions regarding Hart's War. I was expecting to see a blood-and-guts WWII P.O.W. flick with Bruce Willis kicking Nazi butt, just like Audie Murphy. Instead, I was pleasantly surprised by this strange mixture of The Verdict and The Great Escape that delivers on all fronts, with a cunning script, great acting, and subtle directing.

The story resembles one of those studio pictures of the 1940s and 1950s made famous by the likes of William Holden and Gary Cooper. Willis plays Col. William McNamara, the highest-ranking officer in German prisoner camp Stalag IV during the tail end of the WWII. McNamara retains the dignity of his fellow American soldiers held captive and silently plans to strike back against the enemy under the suspicious eyes of German Col. Werner Visser (Marcel Iures). When a murder occurs in the camp, McNamara sets in motion a plan of attack against his German counterparts by orchestrating a court martial headed by Lt. Tommy Hart (Colin Farrell), an Army desk jockey with a senator for a father who was recently captured in Belgium. As the tensions mount and sides are taken, both friend and foe uncover duplicities within their own ranks, values of lives are weighed against the duties of soldiers, and the question of honor versus freedom plays out to the final whopper of an ending.

Continue reading: Hart's War Review

Big Momma's House Review


Grim
Oh, to have been a fly on the wall when Big Momma's House was cooked up.... Dress funnyman Martin Lawrence up as a 350-pound Georgia grandmother, spin him around, and let him do his thang. Beat Eddie Murphy at his own game (Nutty Professor II hits theaters later this year), shoot it for cheap with no other real stars, and grab some good grosses.

Sure enough, Big Momma's House is a comic crowd-pleaser that should score well with audiences that refuse to tire of incessant fat jokes, slapstick, and, well, more fat jokes.

Continue reading: Big Momma's House Review

Four Brothers Review


Good
Whoever heard of a "blaxploitation" movie with a white hero? Now you have: Four Brothers. John Singleton pays homage once again to what is apparently one of his favorite cinematic genres, but this time not quite as overt as with his remake of Shaft. And while Brothers can occasionally come off as cheesy as those '70s flicks that inspired it, it's also as much fun to watch with its zany cast of characters, wild action sequences, and booty-shakin' funk and soul soundtrack.

The story is a balls-out revenge tale, opening with the violent death of kindhearted old mother Evelyn Mercer (Fionnula Flanagan) during a convenience store hold-up. Evelyn's funeral brings home her four adopted sons: mercurial bruiser Bobby (Mark Wahlberg), military man Angel (Tyrese), entrepreneurial Jeremiah (Andre Benjamin aka Outkast's Andre 3000), and semi-famous rocker Jack (Garrett Hedlund). Being back home together brings back memories of the "only woman who ever loved us," but also brings back their thuggish ways, especially when they find out mom's tragic accident may have been murder. That's when the fast-based, Charles Bronson-esque vigilante part of this tale kicks into high gear.

Continue reading: Four Brothers Review

Best Laid Plans Review


OK
Straight-to-video movies usually do so for a reason, but Best Laid Plans just may have gotten a bum rap. Centered around a complicated scheme between Nivola and Witherspoon (fiesty as ever, here) to steal a valuable Civil War artifact in order to pay back the subject of an earlier crime, things get progressively more complicated until the enexorably uninspired conclusion. While it's a relatively tepid thriller, Best Laid Plans actually had me sit up on the edge of my seat once, and any chance to see Witherspoon in handcuffs is certainly an opportunity not to be missed.

Crash Review


OK
A meditation on the often unacknowledged undercurrentsof racism in everyday American city life, "Crash" has the kindof broad appeal that can draw large audiences and the kind of lingeringemotional potency that can lead to serious soul-searching.

An impressive ensemble cast lends strong character to acultural cross-section of Los Angeles denizens who are connected to eachother through crime, corruption, obligation, indignation and chance overa two-day period. The most powerful storyline features Matt Dillon andRyan Phillippe as beat cops -- one jaded and abusive, the other fresh andidealistic -- who pull over and harass (much to Phillippe's dismay) a blackyuppie couple (Terrence Howard and Thandie Newton) because the SUV they'redriving vaguely fits the description of a carjacked vehicle.

Within 24 hours, these characters all cross paths againin separate incidents of incredibly high tension that challenge both theprejudices that have formed between them and the conclusions we've beenled to as an audience.

Although they do not meet again, similarly potent table-turningand judgment-testing events occur in the lives of the actual carjackers(Larenz Tate and rapper Ludacris, whose character is ironically obsessedwith being stereotyped) and their victims, an ambitious district attorneyand his uptight wife (played with depth and conviction by Brendan Fraserand Sandra Bullock).

Continue reading: Crash Review

Ray Review


Weak

At the center of any good biographical feature film is a great performance, like Jamie Foxx's body-and-soul channeling of soul music's original ivory-twinkling innovator Ray Charles in "Ray." But a great performance does not make a biopic great. To rise above the kind of "true stories" that are the fodder of several assembly-line TV movies every year, a biopic needs to be like Ray Charles -- departing from formula and daring to be different.

Director Taylor Hackford (who once helmed the Chuck Berry concert film "Hail! Hail! Rock'n'Roll") doesn't manage that in "Ray," a film that feels more like a two-and-a-half-hour highlights reel from Charles' life. But as a primer on that man's life (musical brilliance, adultery, addiction, and lip service to lyrical controversy and segregation struggles) -- and for a film with a prefabricated story arc and little detail (Charles fathered 12 kids, only three or four of which are even mentioned in the film) -- "Ray" could be a lot worse.

At the very least it has a passionately devoted, dead-on lead actor -- Foxx not only nails the blind soul king's swaying jitterbug body language, but also seems to capture his very essence as a man and musician -- and a whole lot of fantastic, toe-tapping, heart-pumping R&B.

Continue reading: Ray Review

Terrence Dashon Howard

Terrence Dashon Howard Quick Links

Film RSS
Advertisement

Suggested

Daniel Craig Hopes 'Spectre' Shows His Bond Is Not As 'Sexist And Misogynistic' As Before

Daniel Craig Hopes 'Spectre' Shows His Bond Is Not As 'Sexist And Misogynistic' As Before

The actor will have his fifth outing as the secret agent in 'Spectre' this November.

'The Danish Girl' Director Reveals When Eddie Redmayne Was Cast As Transgender Artist Lili Elbe

'The Danish Girl' Director Reveals When Eddie Redmayne Was Cast As Transgender Artist Lili Elbe

The director faced some backlash when Redmayne was announced as playing the transgender pioneer.

Advertisement
Tyler The Creator Speaks Out On UK Ban

Tyler The Creator Speaks Out On UK Ban

The rapper was denied entry to Britain on August 26th.

Noel Gallagher's High Flying Birds - Here's A Candle (For Your Birthday Cake) Audio

Noel Gallagher's High Flying Birds - Here's A Candle (For Your Birthday Cake) Audio

Noel Gallagher's High Flying Birds topped UK charts with his second album 'Chasing Yesterday' in February.

Filmmaker Wes Craven Dies Aged 76

Filmmaker Wes Craven Dies Aged 76

Filmmaker Wes Craven has died at the age of 76, his family has announced. With a career spanning over 40 years, Craven was one of the most prolific...

Advertisement