Tcheky Karyo

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Tcheky Karyo - A host of stars were snapped as they attended the British Academy of Film and Television Awards (BAFTA) Los Angeles Tea Party which were held at The Four Seasons Hotel in Beverly Hills, Los Angeles, California, United States - Sunday 11th January 2015

Tcheky Karyo

Tcheky Karyo - A host of stars were photographed as they took to the red carpet at the 72nd Annual Golden Globe Awards which were held at The Beverly Hilton Hotel in Los Angeles, California, United States - Sunday 11th January 2015

Tcheky Karyo

Special Forces Review


Good
Slick and pacey, this military thriller feels contrived as it ramps up the drama, but it has a terrific cast and a vivid sense of violent peril and political instability. The film gets increasingly worthy as it goes along, but is sharp enough to engage us.

Barely recovered from a full-on secret mission to Kosovo, the French Special Forces team (including Hounsou, Menochet, Figlarz and Marius) heads to the mountains of Pakistan, where journalist Elsa (Kruger) and her local assistant (Nebbou) have been kidnapped by wild-eyed fanatic Zaief (Degan). The team is joined on the ground by Tic-Tac (Magimel), and while the rescue goes to plan, Zaief's well-armed militia is relentless (Personnaz's sniper calls them "playful"). And getting out is trickier than these six tough guys expected.

Continue reading: Special Forces Review

The Way Review


Excellent
This thoughtful, openly emotive film resists cynicism due to its quiet honesty.

As a story of self-discovery, it may seem a little simplistic, but the themes it grapples with along the way are genuinely challenging.

Tom (Sheen) is a California ophthalmologist whose only son Daniel (Estevez) dropped out of society in his late 30s to travel the world. Then Tom gets a call: Daniel has died on the Camino de Santiago (The Way of St James) in northern Spain. In France to collect the body, Tom suddenly decides to take the two-month pilgrimage himself, partly to understand his son better. Along the way he collects three companions who just won't leave him alone: a jaded Canadian (Unger), a too-cheerful Dutchman (van Wageningen) and a jagged Irishman (Nesbitt).

Continue reading: The Way Review

Tcheky Karyo - Tuesday 20th May 2008 at Cannes Film Festival Cannes, France

Tcheky Karyo

Wing Commander Review


Bad
You've played the game, now see the movie. Right?

Wrong-o. I've never played the game aside from a 30-minute tour, and now I wish I hadn't seen the movie, either.

Continue reading: Wing Commander Review

Blueberry Review


Excellent
Moebius, aka Jean Giraud, is best known as the artist who revolutionized Continental comic books in the 1960s and 1970s. His work, highly stylized and fittingly surreal, is synonymous with science fiction illustration and the premier adult fantasy comic magazine, Metal Hurlant (Heavy Metal, in the states.) While he began his work as an illustrator for various French magazines and fanzines, it wasn't until the 1970s, when he adopted the pen name Moebius, that his work became internationally recognized. Despite his frequent forays into science fiction and fantasy, his western strip Blueberry (with Jean-Michel Charlier) is perhaps his best-known work. While Mike Blueberry, the cowboy hero of the eponymous strip, has traveled the dusty back roads for over 30 years there has not been a film adaptation of his adventures until now.

Jan Kounen, the Dutch cause celebre responsible for the hyperactive cult film Dobermann, tackles the epic story of Blueberry with a careful, almost blissed out style - much to the dismay of fans of his earlier work. Blueberry is a meditative work, a somnambulist's ramble through western history and psychedelica. The film is slowly paced but crescendos in a special effects blowout, a literal celluloid peyote trip, which would make Alejandro Jodorowsky jump with joy. (That isn't a random aside, Blueberry is as close an homage to Jodorowsky's El Topo as a big budget western can get.)

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The Patriot Review


Excellent
A note to filmmakers who want to make a movie about a war: Please understand that your film does not need to be as long as the actual war itself. We will not hold it against you if it's shorter. As such, I will try to keep this review to a length where you can read it in a few minutes.

The Patriot gives Mel Gibson the opportunity to do something he's never done before: To orate at length about the evils of taxation without representation... oh, okay... and to kill a bunch of damn redcoats!!!

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La Femme Nikita Review


Good
Or just Nikita, as it was called before some guy at Samuel Goldwyn decided that they needed to make absolutely sure everybody knew the film was French and tacked-on that "La Femme." The film that made the career of Luc Besson (The Fifth Element, The Messenger) starts off on a Paris street as a quartet of jacked-up junkies, including Nikita (Anne Parillaud), stride over rain-slicked cobblestones towards the drugstore they're going to rob for their fix. After a shootout with the police, Nikita kills one of the cops in cold blood. Sentenced to death and supposedly executed, Nikita is instead secreted away into a government program where she's trained to become a secret agent.

For the greater part of her time in the program, Nikita acts like the addict-in-withdrawal that she is, ignoring her trainers and pulling a gun on her handler, the incongruously-named Bob (Tchéky Karyo). Then, threatened with a couple of weeks to get her act together, the antiauthoritarian punk becomes the perfect student. Before we know it, three years have passed and she's ready for her graduation present - an assassination mission at a restaurant that turns into a guns-blazing melee. Like the film's pulse-pounding beginning, it's an impressive bit of mayhem, mostly for the incongruous sight of Nikita, in her chic black cocktail dress, scurrying through a kitchen, blasting away with a massive handgun at thugs packing assault rifles and grenade launchers. But, whereas the opening scenes were shocking in their amoral ferocity, this shootout - including a scene where Nikita dives down a laundry chute to escape a blossoming fireball - shows Nikita to be just another action movie, with the usual tenuous-at-best grip on reality.

Continue reading: La Femme Nikita Review

Blade II Review


Weak

Visually and atmospherically, the video game-like vampire-action sequel "Blade II" is slick, dark and cool, yet it doesn't take itself too seriously. The flick's fancy-schmancy martial arts fight scenes even incorporate low-brow wrestling moves like the pile-driver.

But strip away its elusive sense of humor and its expensively hip Hong Kong-spawn sheen, and what's left is a sloppy plot, lifeless characters (no pun intended), and elementary execution masquerading as something more.

Based on one of those now-ubiquitous comic books set in a dusky, dingy alternative reality, the movie is about a vampire hunter who is half vampire himself -- he has all the usual bloodsucker powers but he can go out in the sun. Wesley Snipes, sporting a flamboyant flattop coif, wrap-around shades and a black leather duster, reprises his title role from the 1998 original, which was pretty much nothing but blood-splattered nightwalker-daywalker showdowns set to a rave music beat. Knowledge of that movie isn't a prerequisite for this one, which is a marked improvement while still being saddled with all the same problems.

Continue reading: Blade II Review

Wing Commander Review


Weak

If you want more for your $8 than just a video game brought to life bya cast of third-tier actors without a modicum of depth, excitement or reason,"Wing Commander" probably isn't for you. But I will give it creditfor two things:

1) Through 100 minutes devoid of a single spark of creativityor character appeal, somehow I was never bored.

Continue reading: Wing Commander Review

The Patriot Review


OK

For a relentlessly unoriginal, pandering and predictable, two-and-a-half hour Revolutionary War epic that white-washes slavery, chooses exaggerated slow-motion action over any interest in historical accuracy and is helmed by a director who has demonstrated little talent for anything but overblown textbook filmmaking, "The Patriot" isn't a bad movie.

It's a mimeographed knock-off of "Braveheart" in buckskin vests and powdered wigs, but that doesn't seem to bother Mel Gibson, who won an Oscar for directing that film and stars in this one as another tread-upon colonial who takes up arms against England for his nation's freedom.

A hero of the French and Indian War who has since pledged to raise his children as a pacifist plantation farmer in South Carolina, Benjamin Martin (Gibson) is an amalgam of real revolutionary war figures, fantasized by screenwriter Robert Rodat ("Saving Private Ryan") as a politically correct hero who is a wonderful widower father, who communes with the natives (he's versed in the deadly use of a Tomahawk hatchet), who employs his plantation workers instead of enslaving them, and who takes up arms again only after a stuffy, sadistic redcoat Colonel named Tavington (Jason Issacs) kills one of his sons in cold blood when he finds Martin's home filled with rebel soldiers receiving first aid after a battle.

Continue reading: The Patriot Review

The Core Review


Unbearable

It would be a terrible shame if talented actors like Stanley Tucci, Delroy Lindo and Alfre Woodard have reached a point where money trumps professional pride. But I can't imagine any other reason they'd sign on to a half-witted, obscenely formulaic, huge-budget save-the-Earth sci-fi embarrassment like "The Core."

Almost exactly the same movie as "Armageddon" -- and almost as insufferable -- it features a handful of good-looking scientists and NASA astronauts who, instead of going into space to set off a nuke and save the world from a asteroid, travel to the center of the Earth to set off a nuke, thus restarting the dying molten core and saving the world from electromagnetic disaster.

The exact same shopworn characters die in the exact same order, some accidentally, some heroically to save the mission. The simplest laws of physics and even plain-as-day physical facts are utterly ignored (the nuke-the-core plan is based on two-dimensional thinking even though the Earth is -- duh! -- a sphere).

Continue reading: The Core Review

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Tcheky Karyo Movies

Special Forces Movie Review

Special Forces Movie Review

Slick and pacey, this military thriller feels contrived as it ramps up the drama, but...

The Way Movie Review

The Way Movie Review

This thoughtful, openly emotive film resists cynicism due to its quiet honesty. As a story...

Wing Commander Movie Review

Wing Commander Movie Review

You've played the game, now see the movie. Right?Wrong-o. I've never played the...

The Patriot Movie Review

The Patriot Movie Review

A note to filmmakers who want to make a movie about a war: Please...

Addicted To Love Movie Review

Addicted To Love Movie Review

The idea of a "revenge comedy" naturally appeals to my dark side, and I've always...

The Messenger: The Story of Joan of Arc Movie Review

The Messenger: The Story of Joan of Arc Movie Review

Milla J., stick to the singing career.Luc Besson, imaginative mind behind such notable works of...

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The Good Thief Movie Review

The Good Thief Movie Review

The heist movie, or robbery movie, has worn out its welcome in recent years. There's...

Saving Grace Movie Review

Saving Grace Movie Review

There is comic potential in Saving Grace, but its two interesting main characters and their...

A Very Long Engagement Movie Review

A Very Long Engagement Movie Review

Although there are likely better directors who could have been found to film Sebastien Japrisot's...

Kiss of the Dragon Movie Review

Kiss of the Dragon Movie Review

Wham, bam, thank you ma'am! Jet Li has finally returned to prime ass-kicking form...

My Life So Far Movie Review

My Life So Far Movie Review

I guess you're either one of those people who loves 1930's Scottish coming-of-age stories, or...

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