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Tab Hunter: Confidential Trailer


Tab Hunter was America's Boy Next Door in the 1950s, attracting a large female following who were captivated by his good looks and charm. As his career went from strength to strength it seemed nothing could stop him, unless of course the secret about his sexuality got out. In Tab Hunter Confidential we will meet, for the first time the real Tab Hunter as he shares his true story about being a gay actor in Hollywood back when it would have ended your career and maybe even landed you in jail. From starring in films opposite Natalie Wood in the 1950s to kissing Divine in John Water's Polyester in the 1980s, Tab Hunter has had a rollercoaster ride like no other in Hollywood and now he's happy, healthy and ready to tell his tale of success and survival.

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45th Anniversary Gala Vanguard Awards

Tab Hunter - Shots from the 45th Anniversary Gala Vanguard Awards which were held at the Hyatt Century City Plaza in Los Angeles, California, United States - Saturday 8th November 2014

Tab Hunter
Tab Hunter

45th Anniversary Gala Vanguard Awards

Tab Hunter - 45th Anniversary Gala Vanguard Awards at Hyatt Century City Plaza - Arrivals at Hyatt Regency Century Plaza - Los Angeles, California, United States - Saturday 8th November 2014

Tab Hunter
Tab Hunter
Brad Altman, George Takei, Lori Jean and Tab Hunter
Brad Altman, George Takei, Lori Jean and Tab Hunter
Tab Hunter

I Am Divine Review


Excellent

With an appropriate explosion of humour and colour, this documentary traces the life of a fiercely individualistic actor, digging beneath the surface to explore both his origins and his legacy. And frankly, it's about time someone documented the iconic cross-dressing performer Divine, who died at age 42 in 1988, just as his career was leaping into the mainstream. The fact is that this man completely changed music, theatre and cinema.

Born in Baltimore, Glenn Milstead played dress-up as a child and was routinely beaten up in school. He could never pass as a normal kid, so he never tried. Fortunately, at 17 he met John Waters and found a group of people who were outcasts like him. Waters renamed him Divine for his film Roman Candles, and the name stuck. Divine spent time in San Francisco developing the character while performing with the legendary Cockettes, then took the New York stage by storm and launched an international recording career., He also continued to rise in the ranks of cinema actors with performances in Waters' classics Pink Flamingoes, Female Trouble, Polyester and the award-winning Hairspray, which crossed-over into mainstream success and led to a non-drag role as Uncle Otto in the hit TV sitcom Married... With Children. He died of heart failure in his sleep the night before taping his first episode.

Filmmaker Jeffrey Schwarz (whose previous film Vito documented the life of gay-rights activist Vito Russo) gives the movie a lively pace, as a wide range of colourful people talk about their experiences with Divine through the years, including his mother Frances Milstead who reunited with her son later in life. There's also extensive footage of Divine talking about himself in interviews he gave around the world throughout his career. Combined with extensive clips, backstage video and personal photographs, the film is a remarkably complex portrait of a talented artist who was excessive in everything: food, drugs and love. But he was also fiercely disciplined when it came to his work.

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HFPA Annual Luncheon

Tab Hunter - Hollywood Foreign Press Association's 2013 Installation Luncheon - Los Angeles, CA, United States - Tuesday 13th August 2013

Hollywood Foreign Press Association's 2013 Installation Luncheon

Tab Hunter - Hollywood Foreign Press Association's 2013 Installation Luncheon Held at The Beverly Hilton Hotel - Beverly Hills, California, United States - Tuesday 13th August 2013

Tab Hunter at the 'Hollywood Show' held at Burbank Marriott convention center

Tab Hunter Saturday 4th August 2012 Tab Hunter at the 'Hollywood Show' held at Burbank Marriott convention center

Tab Hunter

The Loved One Review


Extraordinary
Decades before Six Feet Under, The Loved One skewered the paradox of the funeral business in appearance-obsessed L.A. Wildly and unpredictably funny, The Loved One careens from scene to scene so quickly you may not be able to keep up with the jokes.

And what jokes they are! The very American Robert Morse stars as a British visitor to L.A., a wannabe poet who gets caught up in the machinations of a cemetary owner (Jonathan Winters) and his top mortician (Rod Steiger in the role of a lifetime). It's more cult than cemetary, and Morse soon becomes enchanted with one the cemetary's guide/beautician/chanteuse (a dippy Anajette Comer). The film haphazardly careens from subplot to subplot, eventually settling into a set piece about a kid obsessed with rockets, which Winters sees as the solution to the problem of running out of space for "loved ones" in the cemetary (aka corpses).

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Battle Cry Review


OK
Battle Cry is a colorful and overpacked CinemaScope-era World War II epic that, at two hours and 29 minutes long, feels about as long as the Battle of the Pacific it depicts. What sets it apart from other WWII flicks is its emphasis on the psychology of soldiering rather than the logistics of battle. It's not about the assault on the beach. It's about how the soldiers have been trained to feel about the assault on the beach. The result: too much talk and not enough flamethrowing for a film that covers the war's bloodiest battles.

We begin with a trainload of Marine recruits who are so stereotypical that the solemn narrator even introduces them by their stereotype labels: the dumb north country lumberjack Andy (Aldo Ray), the All-American boy Dan (Tab Hunter), the hoodlum, the sensitive bookworm, the "Injuns" recruited for Navajo code talking, and so on. They've left behind an assortment of families and girlfriends who will haunt their thoughts and test their faithfulness throughout 10 weeks of basic training in San Diego and the ocean journey to Hawaii and beyond.

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War Gods of the Deep Review


Terrible
Musta been running out of Edgar Allen Poe material to adapt into screenplays... and War Gods of the Deep stands as probably the least amusing film to come from his collected works.The story is something or other about an underwater city populated by smugglers that never age (huh?) and the humans who get trapped there, spending most of the film asking their fellow prisoners if they remember the way in. Wholly unmemorable.

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Damn Yankees! Review


OK
I like baseball. I love movies, especially musicals. I figured that Damn Yankees! would be my movie version of Reese's Peanut Butter Cups. It was more like combining chocolate and a pound of seasoned ground beef.

This 1958 musical, adapted from George Abbott's Broadway hit, presents a baseball fan's ultimate dream. What if you could help your favorite team win the pennant? And what if you got to be the star of that team?

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Polyester Review


OK
John Waters' 1981 Polyester was his final really-low-budget, non-SAG production. Starring Divine, paired of course with the rakish Tab Hunter (Damn Yankees!), it's a classic entry into his gross-out genre, best known for his use of "Odorama," a scratch-and-sniff card handed out to moviegoers before the film and number-coded to certain nose-friendly scenes within the movie.

Shot for $300,000 and set (of course) in Baltimore (not to mention starring virtually all of its residents), Polyester tells the story of harried suburban wife Francine Fishpaw (Divine), who faces the triple threat of a pornographer husband (David Samson), a pregnant daughter (Mary Garlington), and a drug addict son (Ken King) who stomps the feet of local women. Not to mention her wild obesity and alcoholism (and of course, she's a man, but that's another story).

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The Loved One Review


Extraordinary
Decades before Six Feet Under, The Loved One skewered the paradox of the funeral business in appearance-obsessed L.A. Wildly and unpredictably funny, The Loved One careens from scene to scene so quickly you may not be able to keep up with the jokes. The black and white photography is stark, reminiscent of Dr. Strangelove (as is the whole film -- with Jonathan Winters in two roles), though some of the details get lost in the deep shadows. It's not out on video, so watch for it on cable. It's well worth it.
Tab Hunter

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