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Susan Sarandon - Screening of 'The Secret Life of Marilyn Monroe' - Arrivals at The Theatre at The Ace Hotel - Los Angeles, California, United States - Monday 11th May 2015

Susan Sarandon
Kelli Garner and Susan Sarandon
Kelli Garner and Susan Sarandon
Susan Sarandon
Susan Sarandon

Susan Sarandon - A variety of celebrities were snapped as they attended Lifetime's Miniseries "The Secret Life Of Marilyn Monroe" Special Screening And Panel Inside which was held at the Theatre At The Ace Hotel in Los Angeles, California, United States - Tuesday 12th May 2015

Susan Sarandon
Susan Sarandon
Susan Sarandon
Laurie Collyer, Susan Sarandon and Keri Selig
Kelli Garner and Susan Sarandon
Kelli Garner and Susan Sarandon

Kelli Garner and Susan Sarandon - A variety of celebrities were snapped as they attended Lifetime's Miniseries "The Secret Life Of Marilyn Monroe" Special Screening And Panel Inside which was held at the Theatre At The Ace Hotel in Los Angeles, California, United States - Monday 11th May 2015

Kelli Garner and Susan Sarandon
Kelli Garner
Kelli Garner
Kelli Garner
Kelli Garner
Kelli Garner

Susan Sarandon - Shots of a host of stars as they arrive for the annual German Goldene Kamera Awards 2015 which were held at Messehallen in Hamburg, Germany - Saturday 28th February 2015

Susan Sarandon
Susan Sarandon
Susan Sarandon

Susan Sarandon - Shots of a host of stars as they arrive for the annual German Goldene Kamera Awards 2015 which were held at Messehallen in Hamburg, Germany - Friday 27th February 2015

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Susan Sarandon
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Susan Sarandon

Susan Sarandon - Goldene Kamera Awards 2015 at Messehallen. - Arrivals at Messehalle (fair hall) - Hamburg, Germany - Friday 27th February 2015

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Susan Sarandon
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Susan Sarandon

Susan Sarandon and Okello Sam - Rehearsals for Hope North gala at City Winery, honoring Forest Whitaker - New York, New York, United States - Wednesday 22nd October 2014

Susan Sarandon and Okello Sam
Susan Sarandon and Okello Sam
Susan Sarandon and Okello Sam
Susan Sarandon and Okello Sam
Susan Sarandon and Okello Sam

Susan Sarandon - Private New York City Screening of "The Hunger" at Museum Of Modern Art - New York City, New York, United States - Wednesday 8th October 2014

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Susan Sarandon
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Susan Sarandon

Melissa McCarthy and Susan Sarandon - Melissa McCarthy's hand and footprint ceremony hel d at the TCL Chinese Theatre - Los Angeles, California, United States - Wednesday 2nd July 2014

Melissa Mccarthy and Susan Sarandon
Melissa Mccarthy
Ben Falcone and Melissa Mccarthy
Melissa Mccarthy
Melissa Mccarthy
Melissa Mccarthy

Susan Sarandon and Melissa McCarthy - 'Tammy' (2014) - Directed by Ben Falcone - United States - Wednesday 2nd July 2014

Susan Sarandon and Melissa Mccarthy

Susan Sarandon - Film Premiere of Tammy - Los Angeles, California, United States - Tuesday 1st July 2014

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Susan Sarandon
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Susan Sarandon

Susan Sarandon - Los Angeles premiere of Tammy held at the TCL Chinese Theatre - Arrivals - Los Angeles, United States - Monday 30th June 2014

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Susan Sarandon - Coach, Inc and Friends of the High Line present the fourth annual Summer Party on the High Line in New York City - New York City, New York, United States - Tuesday 17th June 2014

Susan Sarandon
Susan Sarandon
Susan Sarandon

Susan Sarandon - Susan Sarandon lights the Empire State Building purple, blue and gold to celebrate the 15th anniversary of 'Only Make Believe' - New York City, New York, United States - Tuesday 17th June 2014

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Susan Sarandon and Dena Hammerstein
Susan Sarandon

Susan Sarandon - Celebrities outside the Ed Sullivan Theater for their taping on the Late Show with David Letterman - New York City, United States - Monday 16th June 2014

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Susan Sarandon - 13th Annual Samsung Hope for Children Gala held at Cipriani Wall St - Arrivals - New York City, New York, United States - Tuesday 10th June 2014

Susan Sarandon
Susan Sarandon

Susan Sarandon - Samsung Hope For Children Gala hled at Cipriani Wall St - Arrivals - New York, New York, United States - Wednesday 11th June 2014

Susan Sarandon
Susan Sarandon

Susan Sarandon - Samsung Hope For Children Gala 2014 - Arrivals - New York, New York, United States - Wednesday 11th June 2014

Susan Sarandon

Susan Sarandon and Padma Lakshmi - =TIME celebrates its TIME 100 issue of the 100 most influential people in the world gala at Frederick P. Rose Hall in New York City - New York City, New York, United States - Tuesday 29th April 2014

Susan Sarandon and Padma Lakshmi
Susan Sarandon and Padma Lakshmi
Susan Sarandon and Padma Lakshmi
Susan Sarandon
Susan Sarandon

Okello Sam and Susan Sarandon - Variety Power Of Women: New York - Red Carpet Arrivals - NYC, New York, United States - Friday 25th April 2014

Okello Sam and Susan Sarandon
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Jeff, Who Lives At Home Trailer


Jeff could not be more different from his brother Pat. Where Pat is a successful businessman in a happy marriage, Jeff lives in his mother's basement all day, smoking weed and watching his favourite film, Signs. Drawing deep significance from the film, Jeff starts to believe that everything in life has a purpose. This takes its toll on his mother, who is tired of Jeff staying indoors all day. Also becoming irritated by his brother's behaviour is Pat, who has much better things to do than pick up after his brother.

Continue: Jeff, Who Lives At Home Trailer

Wall Street: Money Never Sleeps Review


Very Good
Michael Douglas returns to his most iconic role for this 20-years-later sequel to Oliver Stone's 1987 hit. Of course it couldn't be much more timely, as it dips into the current financial chaos and the drama behind the scenes.

Jake (LaBeouf) is a rising-star broker working for a Wall Street veteran (Langella). His girlfriend Winnie (Mulligan) is the estranged daughter of the legendary Gordon Gekko (Douglas), who recently completed his prison term for insider trading. But Jake's idea to reunite Winnie and her dad takes a turn when they begin a kind of teacher-student relationship. Jake then takes a job for an archrival investor (Brolin) to orchestrate his downfall. But this is 2008 and banks are starting to collapse around them. And maybe Gekko is up to his old tricks.

Continue reading: Wall Street: Money Never Sleeps Review

Wall Street: Money Never Sleeps Trailer


23 years after Gordon Gekko's incarceration for insider trading, he finds himself being released into the outside world. He may have no family to meet him but he's ready to once again take his place in the business world. His soon to be son-in-law Jacob contacts Gordon in the hope that together they will reunite father and daughter. Winnie has always been wary of her father, especially his business dealings to which she warns her fiancé but when Jacob finds himself taken under the wing of Gordon, the offer is too good to turn down.

Continue: Wall Street: Money Never Sleeps Trailer

Thelma & Louise Review


Essential
Thelma & Louise is a landmark film, one that defines the cinematic terrain for female empowerment and one that effortlessly blends powerful ideas about gender with an endlessly engaging story. The film weaves a story about women in distress, who come from depressed backgrounds and seedy locales, which is not entirely different from any prototypical Lifetime Movie of the Week. The genius of Ridley Scott's direction and Callie Khouri's groundbreaking screenplay is that they allow the film to flirt with standard archetypal conventions, all the while upending conventional notions of women -- particularly women in the sort of situation Thelma and Louise find themselves in.

The movie jumps headfirst into the action without any necessary build-up or labored background. We meet Louise, a headstrong waitress, and her younger, flighty friend Thelma (Geena Davis) as they finalize plans for their road trip. Nothing more or less complicated than that. Where they are going is fairly vague; why they are going is more telling: their explicit purpose in taking a trip is to escape from the men in their lives. Jimmy (Michael Madsen), Louise's longtime casual partner, is a gruff mechanic who loves Louise, but doesn't know how to show it. Darryl (Christopher McDonald), Thelma's husband, is a plain loser, a carpet salesman with a cheesy mustache, bouffant-fro, and a lack of respect for his wife.

Continue reading: Thelma & Louise Review

Speed Racer Review


Terrible
Speed Racer currently leads a race it won't want to win. Right now it's the summer's most irrelevant blockbuster, the first missed opportunity of a still-developing season that hasn't yet entered turn one. Even worse, Racer now sits in the pole position for the undesirable title of Year's Goofiest Movie.

Andy and Larry Wachowski, creators of the Matrix trilogy, contradict themselves from the start. The brothers have written and directed a live-action adaptation of the 1960s anime series that fails to keep a foot in reality. Speed Racer doesn't break new ground; it clings to cartoonish boundaries established by Wile E. Coyote as he pursued that pesky Road Runner. If The Matrix taught the pseudo-spiritual Neo that there was no spoon, then Speed Racer posits that there is no camera. Instead, the Wachowskis are free to bend and twist reality as they create their vibrant environments in high-tech computers. The effect imbues Racer with the depth and dramatic significance of a screen saver.

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Bernard And Doris Review


Good
HBO lined up two big stars to tell the story of billionaire tobacco heiress Doris Duke and her loyal yet shady butler Bernard Lafferty. Susan Sarandon and Ralph Fiennes star in Bernard and Doris and give it a go, but the truth is that they are both miscast, Sarandon especially, and that error subverts what is otherwise a witty half drama/half comedy.

Racing through the final years of Doris's troubled life in typically episodic biopic fashion, the teleplay introduces us to an aging but still feisty woman who doesn't suffer fools gladly and manages her sprawling estate and her finances with an iron fist. When a butler delivers cantaloupe that is chilled incorrectly, Doris fires him on the spot.

Continue reading: Bernard And Doris Review

Mr. Woodcock Review


Bad
For half of the last decade, Billy Bob Thornton has been filling the scumbag/jerk quotient to dwindling effect, culminating in last year's abysmal School for Scoundrels. One half-expected him to try and nab a role in a Catherine Breillat film just to get the taste out of his mouth. It seems this was all wishful thinking: Thornton's latest retread into berating fat kids, retards, and asthma victims, Mr. Woodcock, is at once both completely aimless and without the slightest sense of fun.

Pushed back and up for almost a year now, Woodcock comes from a lineage of productions so misguided that studios eventually release them just to wash their hands of them. Originally slated for a late spring/early summer release, the film was tossed back to November to allow for re-shoots and new edits. Ultimately none of it mattered and they pushed it back up to September. The fact that Wedding Crashers ace David Dobkin was brought in for the aforementioned re-shoots makes the absence of even the lightest chuckle even more profound.

Continue reading: Mr. Woodcock Review

In The Valley Of Elah Review


Excellent
Although Paul Haggis' gut-punch of a story, In the Valley of Elah, is the first truly great narrative film about the Iraq War, it only spends a total of maybe five minutes there. The rest of the time, Elah is back in the U.S., dealing with all the stomach-churning consequences of what the country has sent young men over the sea to do. For this war story, combat -- that terrifying adrenaline high that changes many soldiers forever -- would be a distraction. The film comes at the war elliptically, immersing viewers in a world of soldiers, veterans, military bases, and civilian hangers-on, where President Bush is always pontificating from a nearby radio or television and everyone gets their check, directly or indirectly, from the Pentagon.

Elah is set in late 2004, when previously pro-war segments of the population started seeing cracks in the official flag-waving rhetoric, and ugly rumors started flying about what was actually going on Over There. Haggis' hard-boiled script -- closely based on Mark Boal's harsh, eye-opening article, "Death and Dishonor," published in Playboy in 2004 -- takes the form not of a war film but of a mystery, hiding its disquieting revelations in a familiar structure. Retired military policeman Hank Deerfield (Tommy Lee Jones) finds out that his son Mike (Jonathan Tucker, from Haggis' short-lived TV show The Black Donnellys), currently serving in Iraq, went AWOL not long after coming home on R&R. Having already lost his other son to combat in Afghanistan, and convinced he's getting some sort of runaround from the army, Hank hops in his winded old pickup and heads to Mike's base looking for answers.

Continue reading: In The Valley Of Elah Review

Romance & Cigarettes Review


Weak
John Turturro's dream project Romance & Cigarettes is a gutter-style jukebox musical with chutzpah to spare and which doesn't know when to quit. It's all here: Singing garbagemen! Catfight in a SoHo lingerie store! Hot-to-trot Kate Winslet as a scorchingly foul-mouthed Irish hussy. Toe-tapping Christopher Walken in full strutting peacock mode, driving an old Detroit beater with a license plate reading "BoDiddley." A wife screaming at her husband, recently discovered cheating, "I trim your nose hair!" Family, infidelity, and a basketful of pop tunes for everyone to sing along to -- Ute Lemper to Connie Francis to Bruce Springsteen to James Brown to Tom Jones to....

Somewhere in all Turturro's chaos is a story about Nick Murder (James Gandolfini), a blue-collar schlub with a stolid wife, Kitty (Susan Sarandon), and a trio of slightly cracked daughters -- Constance, Baby, and Rosebud (Mary-Louise Parker, Aida Turturro, and Mandy Moore, respectively) -- who function partially as a junior set of Furies but are mostly there to bash out songs in the backyard as part of the three-piece bubblegum garage band they've formed. In short: Nick's a two-timing bastard who's stepping out on the wife with Tula (the previously mentioned Irish hussy), a fact Kitty doesn't take to overly well, and numerous friends and family get dragged into their scuffle and forcing everyone to occasionally bust out in song.

Continue reading: Romance & Cigarettes Review

Noel Review


Weak
Susan Sarandon starring in your movie ought to guarantee a box office bonanza, no? Well, not always. This terribly ill-advised film (which got only the barest of theatrical releases) is a textbook example of just about everything that guarantees disaster. That includes putting Robin Williams in a non-comedic role, giving Penélope Cruz too much dialogue, having Alan Arkin believe that Paul Walker is his reincarnated wife, and, worst of all, setting your Christmas movie among the horrors of an urban hospital.

The idea here is that our central characters (including all of the above, plus one guy who breaks his own hand so he can relive his Best Christmas Ever as he did as a kid in the E.R.) have problems. You know, New Yorker problems: Walker is a jealous cop (and Cruz is his flirtatious girlfriend), and Sarandon's geriatric mother is an a sort of dazed funk -- just staring at the walls, refusing to eat. Sarandon is the centerpiece of the film: She's a mopey creature who's faced endless disaster in her life (a stillborn baby, even), but she's trying to keep up appearances.

Continue reading: Noel Review

The Hunger Review


Good
Tepid vampire fare is really notable only for being Tony Scott's first major movie and for its steamy love scene between Catherine Deneuve and Susan Sarandon (never mind that awful hairdo). David Bowie would have been a lot more fun if they hadn't offed him in the first 45 minutes.

Tibet: Cry Of The Snow Lion Review


Excellent
What are we going to do about Tibet? It's a heartbreaking question that has no easy answers. Tom Peosay's meticulously prepared Tibet: Cry of the Snow Lion is an excellent introduction to the genocidal horrors that have been committed by the Chinese government against the people of Tibet for 50 years. It's also a powerful primer on the geopolitical realities of the 21st century that make any relief for suffering Tibetans hard to imagine, at least in the short term. Only the superhuman compassion of the Dalai Lama himself shines a ray of light on this very dark situation.

The documentary is not a hysterical human rights diatribe (even though Susan Sarandon and Tim Robbins are present in voiceovers). Peosay points out that Tibetan society was never Shangri-la. It was a highly stratified culture, with armies of peasants serving a fat aristocracy. What everyone shared, however, was a lifestyle built entirely around profound spiritualism. When the Chinese communists invaded to stake their claim to the massive Tibetan plateau in 1950 (Tibet had always considered itself independent of China but didn't have any particular international recognition of that fact), one of their claims was that they had arrived to redistribute land to the peasants, just as they had done in the rest of China. Unfortunately, the landowners were the clergy, and the Tibetan people wouldn't tolerate the abuse of the monks and lamas who served as their spiritual leaders. By 1959, a full crackdown was underway, and during the Cultural Revolution, more than 6,000 monasteries were destroyed. By the time of Mao's death in 1976, one in six Tibetans -- more than a million -- had died of starvation or met a violent end.

Continue reading: Tibet: Cry Of The Snow Lion Review

Illuminata Review


Weak
The art of acting is fascinating and mysterious, even for the actors who practice it. Unfortunately, for many artists, acting is too fascinating, and they can't resist the temptation to over-analyze it and to make plays/films about it. Playwright Brandon Cole and actor-director John Turturro, creators of Illuminata, are the latest to succumb.

Turturro plays a dramatist, Tuccio, struggling to make his name in the Manhattan theater scene at the turn of the century. Tuccio uses the unexpected illness of an actor (played by Matthew Sussman) to convince the owners of a Manhattan theater to chance his play, Illuminata. Unfortunately, that is not only the movie's premise, but also most of the plot.

Continue reading: Illuminata Review

James And The Giant Peach Review


Very Good
Lemme tell ya, this was the most unusual screening I've been to in a long time. After all, what better way to spend a Saturday morning than with 200 hyperactive children, all of whom are fawning over a guy dressed up in a giant, fuzzy, grey bat suit, complete with six-foot wingspan? (Note: as far as I can tell, the bat had nothing to do with the film.) And lemme tell ya, none of this was as strange as the film I was about to see....

Now I'm probably the last person in the world who ought to judge what makes for a good children's movie, but if you'd asked me that yesterday, I certainly wouldn't have said James and the Giant Peach. This is a story about a young boy, James (Paul Terry), whose parents are eaten by a spiritual rhinoceros. He is adopted by his cruel aunts (Miriam Margolyes and AbFab's Joanna Lumley), who abuse him cruelly. Then an "old man" (Pete Postlethwaite) gives James some "alligator tongues" which he spills on a peach tree, creating the aforementioned giant peach. Inside this peach, where James hides to get away from his aunties, he finds a bunch of giant bugs: a Brooklyn centipede (Richard Dreyfuss), a cowardly earthworm (which is, by the way, not a bug--David Thewlis), a sultry spider (Susan Sarandon), a matronly ladybug (Jane Leeves), and sundry other insects.

Continue reading: James And The Giant Peach Review

Joe Gould's Secret Review


Very Good
When Mel Brooks played the Louis XVI in The History of the World, Part I, he often commented, "It's good to be the King." Joe Gould, a voluntarily homeless man, thinks that it's good to be the Bum... and it shows.

Joe Gould spends his days in Greenwich Village, making notes on the subject of humanity. He is compiling an oral history of mankind, a series of transcripts of conversations and essays on the nature of man. He does this by writing at every opportunity in composition books and by mooching off of rich Beatniks during the 50s in New York City. Amongst his supporters: painter Alice Neel (Susan Sarandon), E.E. Cummings, gallery owner Vivian Marquie (Patricia Clarkson) and publishing executive Charlie Duell (Steve Martin). These supporters frequently allow Joe Gould to stay at their homes, as well as contribute small sums of money to the Joe Gould fund.

Continue reading: Joe Gould's Secret Review

Bull Durham Review


Excellent
The first thing you notice in watching Bull Durham 14 years later (now that it has reappeared on a Special Edition DVD) is how incredibly young the players are. Costner's hairline is way up front, Sarandon is a little less wrinkled, and little Tim Robbins looks like he could be in high school.

The story, however, still feels ahead of its time, with Sarandon's femme fatale narrating a tale of how she adopts one player at her local Durham Bulls minor league baseball franchise every year -- providing him with countless years of expertise about the game and essentially screwing him silly along the way. This season, it's "Nuke" LaLoosh (Robbins), a wild pitcher who could use same taming. Also on the case is catcher "Crash" Davis (Costner), whose life lessons also help him out on the field.

Continue reading: Bull Durham Review

Igby Goes Down Review


Very Good
2002 is the year of Kieran Culkin. After a rock-star performance in the one great film this year that everyone missed -- The Dangerous Lives of Altar Boys -- Kieran Culkin delivers another knockout performance as a rebel without a clue or a cause in Igby Goes Down.

Igby Goes Down tells the tale of one boy's rebellion against the 'old money' ways in which he was born. Igby Slocumb (Culkin) lives within a quirky family unit complete with a schizophrenic father (Bill Pullman) - whose last episode earned him a one-way ticket to the funny farm years back, a self-absorbed, Mommie Dearest of a mother (Susan Sarandon), and a repugnant Young Republican reptile of a brother (Ryan Phillippe). His constant attempts at searching out a better life away from his family's stifling dysfunction lead to a number of high school expulsions and an abnormal amount of prescription sedatives for his mother.

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Alfie Review


Weak
With his insatiable appetite for the opposite sex, his cockney British chirp and his healthy confidence in his own good looks, Jude Law's modern-day Romeo romping through Alfie is a smoother-talking Austin Powers without the adolescent giggles.

How much is too much when it comes to Law? Before the female readers answer, consider this: The handsome Brit has his well-manicured hands in three current projects and will release three more films between now and year's end. Needless to say, your tolerance for Law's antics will determine how much you'll enjoy Alfie. Director Charles Shyer's mixed bag of tricks includes a continuous conversation through the imaginary fourth wall and a camera lens that's terrified to let Law wander too far out of frame.

Continue reading: Alfie Review

Light Sleeper Review


Very Good
Light Sleeper feels like a serious '80s film, though it was made all the way in 1992. It's a relic of the drug era, filled with a soulful performance from WIllem Dafoe (a conflicted upper-class dealer who wants to get out of the business), a synthesizer score, and virtually no scenes set during the day. Susan Sarandon and Dana Delany also look straight outta 1983, with a bouffant hairdo and a close-cut Jane Wiedlin cut, respectively. As for the film, it's more hit than miss, and Dafoe's earnest portrayal carries the movie through its rockier, less sensical parts. Worth a look.

Little Women (1994) Review


Excellent
Hollywood did put out one decent flick over the 1994 holidays, and that was Little Women, another remake of Louisa May Alcott's famed novel. Winona Ryder steals the show, and most of the supporting cast are perfect. The story of Little Women is given a new breath of life with this film, and it is still as relevant about our place in the world and overcoming its man-made obstacles as it was when it was written. I mean, I'm like, you know, a guy... and I really dug the movie. Alvarado and Mathis shine above an altogether good cast (while Danes disappoints).

Cradle Will Rock Review


Very Good
Arguably, one of the best directors of the motion picture industry, Orson Welles was once quoted as saying, "When I die, they'll be picking over my creative bones. The films will suddenly get financing; the films will get restored. Old scripts that we couldn't get financed, they'll find the financing for some kid to direct."

Strangely enough, Welles couldn't have been more prophetic.

Continue reading: Cradle Will Rock Review

Cats & Dogs Review


OK
I have officially reached my quota for the year of talking animal movies. Dr. Dolittle 2 pushed me to the edge, and the animatronic animal flick Cats & Dogs has pushed right over it, into a giddy oblivion where I now firmly believe purple dinosaurs can communicate with humans through song and dance.

Cats & Dogs is ridiculous and harmless, a Mission: Impossible for the animal world. For years, a secret high-tech espionage war has been waged between the feline and canine races, right under the noses of ignorant humans. The spark of this high-tech war came about as the result of the dog race overthrowing the then-dominating cat race during ancient Egyptian times (they even ruled the human race). Man's best friend re-established the humans as the dominant race and has protected that balance for years. And a breakthrough for dogs is approaching, as one human, Professor Brody (Jeff Goldblum), is on the verge of discovering an allergy vaccine which will enable all humans and dogs to co-exist in peace. The only problem is that the diabolic Mr. Tinkle (voiced by Sean Hayes), a furry white Persian with the attitude of Richard Grant's character from Hudson Hawk, and his small army of pesky felines have "cat-knapped" the family dog Buddy, who has been guarding the Professor and his family from the tuna-breathed fiends. The bodyguard job then falls on the shoulders of a Beagle pup named Lou (voiced by Toby Maguire) -- who is mistaken as a secret agent dog by an Anatolian Shepard named Butch (voiced by Alec Baldwin).

Continue reading: Cats & Dogs Review

Anywhere But Here Review


Terrible
Anywhere But Here? A more apt title you will not find on a motion picture this decade.

After a witty lead like that, at this point in the movie review, I usually launch into a brief plot synopsis. So here goes: A down-to-earth teenage girl hates her crazy mother.

Continue reading: Anywhere But Here Review

Rugrats In Paris: The Movie Review


Very Good
Well, the Rugrats are back, and, as usual, they're way too sophisticated for their audience. The Simpsons of the Nickelodeon Network has meandered its way back onto the big screen, and this time they are hitting the streets of Paris with more Freudian slips than a sexually-charged first date.

To start with, Grandpa Lou has gotten remarried (leading into, by the way, an excellent parody of The Godfather in the first scene) and all Chuckie wants is a mommy. Meanwhile, Stu Pickles gets a call from Paris demanding that he come to fix a giant mechanical Reptar (a wonderful running Godzilla/Pokemon spoof gag from the series) which he designed.

Continue reading: Rugrats In Paris: The Movie Review

The Witches Of Eastwick Review


Good
This 1980s sensation turned a lot of heads with its scandalous tale of Jack Nicholson -- playing the devil, or at least a devil -- who woos three shrewish women in the small town of Eastwick (think Salem, Massachusetts), turning them essentially into his whores. Ultimately this is a platform for Nicholson to bust loose with what might be his most gregarious performance ever, an over-the-top phantasmagoria that distracts you from the largely absent plot.

The Front Page Review


Very Good
Billy Wilder's version of the classic play carries a lot of fond memories for former newspapermen like myself, but I don't expect The Front Page to resonate quite so well with the rest of the populace. Lemmon plays it straight as a reporter bent on getting out of the business in order to get married while Matthau's hilariously over-the-top editor does everything in his power to keep him on the payroll during a fantastic jailbreak in 1920s Chicago. It drags in the middle, but a good first act and a stellar finale make the movie completely worthwhile.

Pretty Baby Review


Very Good
Here's the film that introduced the world to Brooke Sheilds' eyebrows.

As a 12-year-old daughter of a prostitute (Susan Sarandon) in 1917 New Orleans (when hooking was legal), Sheilds' Violet immediately becomes one of the most memorable characters in the last 30 years of cinema. But let's be honest, a lot of that is due to the unbridled eroticism of her role. She's not just often naked and carousing, she's pretty blase about it. This is a 12-year-old with about twice the world-weariness of Kramer vs. Kramer's Justin Henry.

Continue reading: Pretty Baby Review

Moonlight Mile Review


OK
Warning: This review is tainted by the author's prejudices against Moonlight Mile director Brad Silberling. In 1998, Mr. Silberling took it upon himself to remake Wim Wenders' metaphysical masterpiece Wings of Desire as the anemic Meg Ryan vehicle City of Angels. The quality of Mr. Silberling's film did not compensate for the audacity of the idea, and this critic forever placed a mark of dishonor on the director. This is worth mentioning in light of the discussion of Moonlight Mile that is to follow.

With that said, Moonlight Mile is only half bad. Sure, it's weepy and sentimental and fails to take full advantage of an emotionally fertile premise. But as a story of loss, self-discovery and rebirth it succeeds as much as it fails. If this were baseball, Moonlight Mile would be batting .500, which is good. But this is the movies, so half bad means two and a half stars.

Continue reading: Moonlight Mile Review

Joe Review


Good
Radical working-class bigot Joe (Peter Boyle) certainly has some ideas ("32 percent of all liberals are queers!"), and in his namesake cult film, he discovers that the wealthy father (Dennis Patrick) of a junkie (Susan Sarandon in her awkward motion picture debut) has murdered her drug dealing boyfriend. He extorts Patrick into a friendship, and together they strike up an unlikely friendship. Unfortunately, after the initial shock wears off, so does Joe wear out his friendship in the film. Little happens for the last hour, leaving us to wonder if writer Norman Wexler couldn't have fashioned a better story for this creep to wander through.

Dead Man Walking Review


Excellent
A progressive nun living in the confines of rural Louisiana, and a racist convicted murderer, waiting on death row. The cast of next year's hottest new sitcom? No! They're the leads of Dead Man Walking, a somber "inspired by true events" docudrama wherein the nun, Sister Helen Prejean (Susan Sarandon), becomes the spiritual guide and confidant of the criminal, Matthew Poncelet (Sean Penn).

Poncelet (a hybridized, fictional character), along with a friend, raped and murdered a teenage girl along with her boyfriend back in 1988. Poncelet was convicted and sentenced to death. His execution rapidly approaching, Poncelet struck out to find anyone who could help him file his appeals and requests for pardon hearings. Enter Helen Prejean and the beginning of Dead Man Walking.

Continue reading: Dead Man Walking Review

The Rocky Horror Picture Show Review


Extraordinary
Well here we are, doing the time warp again.

Celebrating 25 years of making high-schoolers giddy with its debauchery and high camp, The Rocky Horror Picture Show is back with a 25th Anniversary two-disc DVD edition, complete with deleted scenes, outtakes, interviews, and an audience participation track.

Continue reading: The Rocky Horror Picture Show Review

The Banger Sisters Review


Weak
Without paying close attention, one could wander into The Banger Sisters expecting a warm and fuzzy friendship yarn delivered by an Oscar-caliber trio of Goldie Hawn, Susan Sarandon, and Geoffrey Rush. You'd be half right. The cast shows up, but the film substitutes "warm and fuzzy" with vulgar dialogue and gratuitously sexual escapades.

This is a shame, because Sisters introduces unusual characters that deserve to be explored, starting with Suzette (Hawn), a former groupie and by-product of the "free love" era who refuses to admit times have changed. Fired from her bartending job at the famed Whisky A Go-Go, Suzette hits the road to Phoenix to rekindle her fizzled relationship with her former cohort, Lavinia "Vinnie" Kingsley (Sarandon), the other half of the infamous Banger Sisters. Along the way, Suzette picks up a neurotic screenwriter named Harry (Rush), who's on his way back to Arizona to murder his father.

Continue reading: The Banger Sisters Review

Stepmom Review


Bad
One of the worst atrocities of American cinema in recent memory, here we get a one-two punch from two women (Susan Sarandon and Julia Roberts) who really should have known better. The setup: Ed Harris is leaving his dried-up wife for a younger dish (see if you can guess who plays who), but mom won't leave well enough alone after she discovers stepmom is incompetent. A cancer diagnosis ensues, but there'll be lots of singing and cleansing tears before the funeral. Shiver. Just thinking about this story makes us throw up in our mouths a little bit. Chris Columbus's most notorious work.

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Safe Passage Review


Very Good
Despite having a well-known and talented cast, including Susan Sarandon, Robert Sean Leonard, and Sam Shepard, this film was all but passed over when it came out in 1994. This can partly be attributed to its basic themes lacking in unique qualities. A bunch of kids from the same household that have their extreme quirks to distinguish them as an actual character come together in a time of crisis to forgive familial faults. Some of the interactions may also be a little too realistic when it comes to family connections so as not to be construed as "entertainment". However the performances in this simple family movie make up for the lack of creativity in its writing. It is a sentimental, easy-to-swallow emotional journey, and that it doesn't flare into heavy dramatics is worth some respect.

Susan Sarandon and Sam Shepard are the quirky and dysfunctional parents of eight brothers (played by Robert Sean Leonard, Sean Astin, etc). Sarandon is always packing and repacking and threatening to move out of the house with humorous melodrama while Shepard has constant headaches and moments of psychosomatic blindness that are caused by stress. One of the brothers is in the military and the film takes place during the time of the Gulf War. All of the family converges from various parts of the globe in order to be together, in wait for news of their brother/son, who is missing.

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Igby Goes Down Review


Excellent

Snarky, 17-year-old, silver-spoon-raised Igby Slocumb has been booted out of every prestigious (and not-so-prestigious) prep school on the East Coast -- and one military academy too. A bored, intelligent, resourceful and willful screw-up, he's almost proud of this record, even though he'd be the first to admit it's a cry for attention.

With a blue-blooded, pill-popping, self-absorbed mother (the hilariously dry Susan Sarandon) dying of breast cancer at home; a materialistically hollow, young Republican brother (a perfectly cast Ryan Phillippe) shining at Columbia University; and an asylum-committed, schizophrenic father (Bill Pullman) who haunts all his childhood memories, Igby (Kieran Culkin) seems to be the only Slocumb sagacious enough to emerge a better person from his sad yet comically dysfunctional family.

So despite the title of this tart black comedy -- "Igby Goes Down" -- its young hero is determined to stay on his feet. He's grown a sardonic, wry sense of humor (if not a tough skin) and become an expert at running away from home. Now, having escaped the limousine taking him to yet another upscale boarding school, he's on the loose in Manhattan, having resolved to get by on his own (or at least with the help of his mother's American Express card), even if he's not entirely sure what that entails.

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Moonlight Mile Review


Good

Finding warmth, humor and uneasy comfort in the face of senseless tragedy, "Moonlight Mile" is a poignant movie about pain and loss that doesn't succumb to melodrama and cry-you-a-river, give-me-an-Oscar performances.

Described as "emotionally autobiographical" by writer-director Brad Silberling ("City of Angels") -- whose actress girlfriend was killed by a stalker in 1989 -- the film is about the apprehensive bond that forms between a young man and the parents of his fiancée, who is murdered in a diner just a few weeks before their wedding.

The story, which takes place in 1970s New England (gratuitous soundtrack warning), opens the morning of the funeral as fresh-from-college Joe Nast (Jake Gyllenhaal) wakes up in the childhood bedroom of his late bride-to-be and begins packing his suitcase. He's planned to leave that night, although he's not sure where he's going. But after the service, he spends the evening with her downhearted, acquiescent and ironic parents (Dustin Hoffman and Susan Sarandon), who have resolved simply to go on with life as planned -- just as soon as Sarandon, fed up with a day of public grieving, tosses into the fireplace all the silly self-help books ("These Things Happen," "Grieving for Grown-Ups") given to them by concerned friends trying awkwardly to help.

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Shall We Dance Review


Weak

A warmhearted semi-romance of self-discovery, "Shall We Dance" opens so promisingly that it's a big disappointment when the picture suffers crucial missteps that throw off its entire rhythm.

Richard Gere stars as a melancholy Chicago probate lawyer whose prosaic life (established in an uncommonly affecting voice-over and a perfectly pitched montage of daily routine) gets a secret, seductive pick-me-up when he discovers a passion for ballroom dancing. Riding home on the elevated train day after day, he becomes drawn to a possible kindred spirit, a beautiful stranger (Jennifer Lopez) who seems to be forever staring sadly out a dance-studio window. One day his intuition gets the better of him. He signs up for a dance class to be near her.

As Gere's ennui is only tenuously related to his marriage (to Susan Sarandon), the film does not go the obvious direction with this attraction. But director Peter Chelsom ("Serendipity") and screenwriter Audrey Wells ("Under the Tuscan Sun") find other ways to turn this remake of a mediocre 1997 Japanese film about cultural repression into a wholly Hollywood affair.

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Anywhere But Here Review


Good

With any lesser actresses than Susan Sarandon and Natalie Portman in the lead roles, the turbulent mother-daughter relationship at the center of "Anywhere But Here" might be little more than fodder for another Lifetime Channel movie -- especially with such a pathetic title.

In fact, I can't imagine what drew director Wayne Wang ("Smoke," "The Joy Luck Club") to what on paper must have looked like a rather prosaic project about a middle-aged woman, desperate for a fresh start, dragging her inimical teenager from Wisconsin to Los Angeles in the hopes of creating a fulfilling and glamorous new life.

But Wang's ability to extract vitality and depth from even the most obvious female roles (a hooker in his "Chinese Box" became a symbol of Hong Kong at the end of English rule) begets such effortlessly extraordinary performances from his stars that this seemingly pedestrian story will ring true for anyone who is now or has ever been a teenage girl embarrassed and imposed upon by her mother. (Frankly, there isn't much here for guys, I'm afraid.)

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The Banger Sisters Review


OK

Old groupies don't die, they just become SUV-driving, Donna Karan-wearing, what-would-the-neighbors-think soccer moms in Phoenix -- which is a fate worse than death if you ask the aging rock'n'roll sexpot played by Goldie Hawn in "The Banger Sisters."

Still a cute and curvy hardy partier decades after her backstage banging days were over, saucy, effervescence Suzette may be a free spirit, but she's also flat broke. Freshly fired from a perfect-fit bartending gig at the Whisky-a-Go-Go in L.A. (for no given reason except to set the plot in motion), she's decides on a whim to hunt down her best groupie-days girlfriend -- who she's heard is now a rich lawyer's wife -- hoping to relive old times and maybe borrow some money.

But it's been 20 years since Suzette has seen Vinnie (Susan Sarandon) -- who now prefers her given name, Lavinia, and has become a micromanaging Martha Stewart type with teenage daughters (Erica Christensen and Sarandon offspring Eva Amurri) that think she's the most uptight square on Earth.

Continue reading: The Banger Sisters Review

Cats & Dogs Review


OK

Why do so many boy-and-his-dog type kiddie movies have a scene at the end in which it looks as if hero hound has died, only to have the critter spring back to life after half the kids in the audience have started crying?

Do moviemakers get some kind of twisted kick out of messing with the wee ones' heads?

No doubt it doesn't do any permanent damage, but this complaint occurred to me during just such a scene at the end of "Cats and Dogs," a fairly formulaic CGI-enhanced live-action adventure of slowly diminishing fun about a secret, millennia-long feline-canine war to take over the world.

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Susan Sarandon

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Susan Sarandon

Date of birth

4th October, 1946

Occupation

Actor

Sex

Female

Height

1.70




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Susan Sarandon Movies

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