Susan Lynch

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The Scouting Book For Boys Review


Good
Increasingly dark and involving, this British drama tells a gripping story through the eyes of an intriguing teen. Not only is he brilliantly performed by Turgoose, but the filmmakers have important things to say without ever preaching.

David (Turgoose) is the mid-teen son of a Norfolk caravan park performer (Maudsley). To survive the boredom, he bonds perhaps too tightly with Emily (Grainger), daughter of the site's shop clerk (Lynch). As they dash across caravan roofs and hang out with security guard Steve (Spall), their life is pretty happy. But Emily's when mother decides to send her to live with her father (Sidi), David helps her hide in a seaside cave. Tension builds when a police detective (Mackintosh) starts investigating. And it gets worse when a secret is revealed.

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The Unloved Review


Excellent
Actress-turned-filmmaker Morton shows a remarkable confidence as director of this intensely personal drama, which is loosely based on her own experiences.

And even though the story wobbles along the way, it's a vital, involving film.

Lucy (Windsor) is an 11-year-old living with her father (Carlyle) in Nottingham. But when a schoolteacher discovers that she has been violently beaten, she's placed in a care home, sharing a room with 16-year-old tearaway Lauren (Socha). Lauren takes Lucy on several rather illicit outings, constantly landing the pair in trouble. And when Lucy wonders why she can't live with her mother (Lynch), her social worker (Stacey) only says that it's not possible.

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Holy Water Trailer


Watch the trailer for Holy Water

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The Scouting Book For Boys Premiere Held At The Vue Cinema

Susan Lynch Friday 2nd October 2009 The Scouting Book for Boys premiere held at the Vue cinema London, England

Susan Lynch
Susan Lynch

The Last Days Of Judas Iscariot - After Party Held At The Almedia Theatre

Susan Lynch Thursday 3rd April 2008 The Last Days of Judas Iscariot - After Party held at the Almedia theatre London, England

Susan Lynch
Susan Lynch
Susan Lynch

Duane Hopwood Review


Grim
Call it the Leaving Las Vegas effect: Everybody wants to make a movie where they play a disgusting antihero who, even as he self-destructs, manages to find a way to redeem himself in the end, even if he's still a dangerous drunk and his personal growth is just minimal. That's well and good, but I'm not sure that David Schwimmer is the go-to guy for such a role. Obviously trying to break free from a decade of typecasting as a nervous geek, he's uncomfortably out of place here and the performance just doesn't work. Things turn out better for Jeneane Garofalo as our pal Duane's ex-wife, though her underwritten role meant that I barely recognized her before the end. Safe to skip. "Hopwood," incidentally, was the plaintiff in the famous "reverse discrimination" lawsuit that ended affirmative action in many arenas. When it's more entertaining to think about an old legal case than watch a movie it has nothing to do with, well... hmmmm.

Beautiful Creatures Review


Excellent
Not to be confused with Beautiful People or Heavenly Creatures, Beautiful Creatures is a British murder-comedy romp in the tradition of Shallow Grave and Lock, Stock, and Two Smoking Barrels.

This time out, its two women (the beautiful Rachel Weisz (The Mummy series) and the less beautiful Susan Lynch) get caught up in a murder when one of their boyfriends gets abusive and takes a lead pipe to the skull at the hands of the other girl. Soon enough, a ransom plan is hatched (despite the fact that the guy is dead), the cops catch on and demand a cut, the body count starts to rise, and the whole affair proves that these girls make poor criminals indeed.

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Waking Ned Devine Review


Good
With more naked Irishman than any other film this year, Waking Ned Devine is a pleasant and breezy comedy about a tiny Irish village and its one Lotto-winning resident, who dies after the shock of winning. A scheme is cooked up to collect the winnings in his stead. Happy comedy. Light on the finish, though.

Casa De Los Babys Review


OK
In a fit of Altman-envy, auteur filmmaker John Sayles has delivered a picture that has a situation instead of a plot and brought together a bevy of top actresses to act it out within a seemingly loose framework. But the lack of a plot doesn't mean it doesn't have a structure, and the one here is engineered to convey the range of needs and problems connected with first-world women adopting third-world babies.

Six women from the U.S. with different life experiences and unique values are brought together in their quests to adopt a baby in an unstated South American country (though shot in and around Acapulco, Mexico). The problem they all face is the bureaucracy that's in charge of the process -- one that feels uncomfortably arbitrary, subject to more whim than substance.

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Beautiful Creatures Review


Grim

While leaving town to get away from her abusive boyfriend, Dorothy (Susan Lynch) comes upon a scene that's all-too-familiar to her: another young woman getting smacked around in the middle of the street.

High on courage and indignation -- at least for the moment -- Dorothy picks up a pipe and bashes the guy's head in, saving platinum blonde trophy squeeze Petula (Rachel Wiesz). But now these newly-bonded sisters have a dead body on their hands.

Such is the set-up for "Beautiful Creatures," an energetic and sometimes clever, dark comedy crime thriller from Scotland that's full of sharp ideas but undermined by blunt-headed characters and logistical loopholes.

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From Hell Review


Weak

A vivid yet distinctly fictitious recreation of the crime-plagued gutters of 19th Century London, the Jack the Ripper thriller "From Hell" is quite a homage to the dense graphic novel from which it was spawned.

It's nothing if not atmospheric, what with its opulently dingy, blood-red set dressings, its pinched-cheek and cheap-corset prostitutes, and its opium- and absinthe-addicted hero -- an unorthodox Scotland Yard Inspector named Abberline (Johnny Depp in lambchop sideburns) who discovers dangerous secrets in the Ripper's ritualized killings.

The film's talented directors -- brothers Allen and Albert Hughes ("Menace II Society," "Dead Presidents"), definitively demonstrating there's more to them than ghetto fare -- blend quite a transporting concoction with their viscous visuals, menacing moodiness, puzzling plot and heady performances.

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Susan Lynch

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