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Stockard Channing and Drama League Awards Friday 18th May 2012 The 78th Annual Drama League Awards, held at the Marriott Marquis Times Square Hotel - Arrivals

Stockard Channing and Drama League Awards

Stockard Channing Thursday 3rd November 2011 Opening night after party for the Lincoln Center production of 'Other Desert Cities' held at the Marriott Marquis Hotel. New York City, USA

Stockard Channing
Stockard Channing
Stockard Channing and Rachel Griffiths
Stacy Keach, Jon Robin Baitz, Judith Light, Rachel Griffiths and Stockard Channing
John Benjamin Hickey, Jon Robin Baitz, Judith Light, Rachel Griffiths and Stockard Channing
Stockard Channing

Stockard Channing and Jon Robin Baitz Thursday 13th January 2011 Opening night after party for the Lincoln Center production of 'Other Desert Cities by Jon Robin Baitz' held at Josephina restaurant. New York City, USA

Stockard Channing and Jon Robin Baitz
Stockard Channing and Jon Robin Baitz
Stockard Channing and Jon Robin Baitz
Stockard Channing and Jon Robin Baitz
Stockard Channing, Jon Robin Baitz and Stacy Keach
Stacy Keach, Elizabeth Marvel, Jon Robin Baitz and Stockard Channing

Stockard Channing Thursday 18th November 2010 Opening night after party for the Lincoln Center Theater Broadway production of 'A Free Man of Color' held at Avery Fisher Hall New York City, USA

Stockard Channing
Stockard Channing

Stockard Channing Monday 15th November 2010 at a screening of 'Public Speaking' held at The Museum of Modern Art New York City, USA

Stockard Channing
Stockard Channing

Stockard Channing - Sunday 7th June 2009 at Radio City Music Hall New York City, USA

Stockard Channing

Stockard Channing - Tuesday 2nd June 2009 at Directors Guild Of America New York City, USA

Stockard Channing

Stockard Channing - Friday 15th May 2009 at Drama League Awards New York City, USA

Stockard Channing
Stockard Channing
Stockard Channing
Stockard Channing
Stockard Channing

Stockard Channing Monday 2nd February 2009 Second Stage Theatre's All-Star Bowling Classic Fundraiser held at Lucky Strike Lanes and Lounge New York City, USA

Stockard Channing
Stockard Channing

Martha Plimpton and Stockard Channing - Martha Plimpton, Stockard Channing New York City, USA - Opening Night performance of the Broadway musical 'Pal Joey' at Studio 54 - After Party Thursday 11th December 2008

Martha Plimpton and Stockard Channing
Martha Plimpton
Martha Plimpton and Stockard Channing
Martha Plimpton, Matthew Risch and Stockard Channing
Martha Plimpton

The West Wing: Sixth Season Review


Good
The death of veteran actor John Spencer -- who played Chief of Staff Leo McGarry, the coolest head among the cast of The West Wing -- was sad news, and it was the final death knell for the once-popular NBC series, now finishing its seventh and final season. That's a shame, because in some ways the show is still getting better.

When creator Aaron Sorkin left The West Wing abruptly in 2003, many people wrote the show off. Sorkin imbued the show with his naïve left-liberal bias and scripted much of its glib dialogue, and his leaving seemed to guarantee an identity crisis. In fact, The West Wing was really nothing more than Sorkin's personal wish fulfillment: What if we elected a strongly moral liberal Democrat as president? Or to put it a different way, what if President Clinton (who was still president when the show started, in 1999) had been even more liberal, and not horny all the time? Sorkin's answer was Jed Bartlet, the imaginary president played by Martin Sheen. Bartlet is sort of a Ted Kennedy with gravitas -- a sententious, northeastern liberal Catholic who, because this is TV, is always right. (With John Kerry we actually had a chance to elect someone like Bartlet, minus the intellectual rigor, and not too surprisingly, the electorate didn't go nuts over him. Of course, Kerry was not as telegenic as Martin Sheen.)

Continue reading: The West Wing: Sixth Season Review

Up Close And Personal Review


Good
If nothing else, Up Close And Personal will remind you just how hideous the hairstyles of the 1980s were, especially among media personalities. Fortunately, the film accomplishes a lot more than that, giving us a nice romance that isn't harmed too much by its attempts at melodrama.

Up Close And Personal tells the loosely-based-on-reality story of Sally (who becomes Tally) Atwater (Michelle Pfeiffer), a vain upstart girl from Reno who wants to make it big in television. Robert Redford costars as Warren Justice, a Miami news director who gives her her big break and takes her under his wing. Under his influence, Tally is transformed from brash loudmouth to The Next Big Thing, and of course, the two fall madly in love along the way.

Continue reading: Up Close And Personal Review

Where The Heart Is Review


Terrible
Long ago, films were constructed of strong dialogue, original characters, memorable plot points, and solid acting. One of the best examples that Hollywood now completely ignore these qualities is found in the new film Where the Heart Is.

This opus about the power of love and the redemption of family follows the tragic, and I mean tragic, life of Novalee Nation (Natalie Portman). Hitting the road with her hick, guitar-playing boyfriend in a rusted-out GM, Novalee dreams of the blue skies of Bakersfield and sipping chocolate milk beneath a plastic umbrella with her unborn baby, due in a month.

Continue reading: Where The Heart Is Review

Isn't She Great Review


Bad
I'll start by saying up front that I really don't admire Bette Midler. I find her loud, hammy, a bit trashy, and generally obnoxious in every way. Oddly, this instantly qualifies her to play novelist Jacqueline Susann, who was loud, hammy, a bit trashy, and generally obnoxious in every way.

If the name Susann doesn't ring a bell, it's because you're too young. "Jackie" was a washed-up actress and radio star when she penned her first novel, The Valley of the Dolls, which went on to become, at its time, the biggest selling novel ever. Why? In the late 60s the tale of drugs and lurid sex against the backdrop of Hollywood was shocking. Now, it's quite tepid, and so is this film, exploring Susann's rise to fame.

Continue reading: Isn't She Great Review

Le Divorce Review


Good
Two American blondes discover the joys of Paris - love, heartache, and wearing scarves in a multitude of ways. The blondes are the Walker sisters of California, Roxy (Naomi Watts) and Isabel (Kate Hudson). As Le Divorce opens, Isabel has just arrived in Paris to stay with Roxy and help her out in the late stages of her pregnancy. As luck would have it, Isabel shows up just as Roxy's husband, Charles-Henri (Melvil Poupaud) is walking out on her and their young daughter. The highly moralistic Roxy refuses to give Charles-Henri a divorce, instigating a battle with his extensive, wealthy family, which is lorded over with queenly arrogance by his mother, Suzanne de Persand (Leslie Caron).

The conflict between the Walker and de Persand clans is meant to be only the backdrop for the film's marquee star, Kate Hudson, to strut her naïve self around Paris and fall in lust with Charles-Henri's uncle, the much-older Edgar (Thierry Lhermitte), a suave TV commentator. But it is this familial battleground that quickly becomes the more engaging storyline, especially after Roxy and Isabel's parents (Sam Waterston and Stockard Channing) fly in from California to help out in the negotiations. Waterston and Channing play their roles with effortless grace, establishing that they've been comfortably married for years by using only the slightest of gestures.

Continue reading: Le Divorce Review

Moll Flanders Review


Weak
Potential taglines for this movie... Moll Flanders: Less than just a bad title. Moll Flanders: Not a shopping center in Belgium. Moll Flanders: Total waste of time.

The last one is the most appropriate for this: a picture which wastes a lot of raw acting talent and pretty photography on a boring, groaning-in-your-seat story which hinges on every cliché in the book.

Continue reading: Moll Flanders Review

The Business Of Strangers Review


Excellent
Never mind the recession, business seems to be booming in the unctuous corporate world of The Business of Strangers. This sharp-minded and crafty estrogen-driven character study about power plays and complex mind games is the feature debut from writer-director Patrick Stettner. The film counters its message of sisterhood with one of the psychological scheming by ambitious women. It's as irresistibly evocative as the stirring misogyny behind Neil LaBute's penetrating In the Company of Men, as Stettner cleverly stages his confrontational chess game in the confining, claustrophobic atmosphere of a hotel lounge where deception is disguised as wit. The Business of Strangers is a fascinating and sardonic look at skirt-wearing corporate creatures, and their ability to be as equally and ridiculously ruthless as their opportunistic male counterparts.

Stockard Channing shines in an Oscar-worthy performance as Julie Styron, a middle-aged corporate executive slated to meet the bigwig of her company at an airport hotel bar. Julie fears the worst because the CEO is flying in to hear her presentation and thoughts of her termination dance in her head constantly. As if she doesn't have enough to worry about in terms of her own uncertain future, Julie fusses over the fact that her desirable and curvy youngish assistant Paula (Julia Stiles, Save the Last Dance, O) is late for the important meeting and is apparently unprepared. Julie abruptly dismisses the twentysomething woman when she finally shows up. Upon Paula's firing, Julie makes arrangements for the terminated young assistant to seek other avenues of employment through a shady corporate headhunter named Nick (Frederick Weller). Meanwhile, it turns out Julie is hit with sudden fortune when it's revealed that she is being made the big cheese of the company, therefore putting to rest her earlier paranoia. Ironically, Julie and Paula bond after a hectic evening of boozing, which culminates in the revelation the Nick is a rapist and all-around creep. The drunken duo then arrange for the lowlife to finally get his comeuppance.

Continue reading: The Business Of Strangers Review

Bright Young Things Review


OK
Bright Young Things arrives at an ideal time. Focusing on a group of twentysomething socialites having a frolicking good time in 1930s London, while the press hungers for every detail, it capitalizes on the current media's fascination with idiot VIPs like the Hilton sisters and Bijou Phillips. For some, Bright Young Things could also serve as a sunnier alternative to the gloomy young things in Garden State, Natalie Portman excluded.

It's OK to have fun in your twenties, and in Bright Young Things, the characters have plenty of it. They attend lavish costume parties that scream of good times and well-funded debauchery, do cocaine like Rick James in 1979 and take trips to the countryside, all the while exchanging quips. At its best, the movie resembles a far more literate, sophisticated version of an episode of the E! True Hollywood Story.

Continue reading: Bright Young Things Review

Bitter Moon Review


Excellent
Certainly a case of deja vu for Hugh Grant, Bitter Moon finds the big Hugh playing hide the little Hugh with a girl he meets on a ship to Istanbul (Emmanuelle Seigner). The only problem is that the wife (Kristin Scott Thomas) doesn't really approve. And then there's the matter of the girl's husband (Peter Coyote), who sends Grant on the chase to start with.

Why is he bound to a wheelchair? How did the innocent couple turn so perverted? Coyote's story talks about bondage, golden showers, and even ends up with Coyote crawling around on the floor, grunting while he wears a pig mask.

Continue reading: Bitter Moon Review

Life Or Something Like It Review


Very Good
Like a gift-wrapped tennis racquet, director Stephen Herek's Life or Something Like It reveals most of its secrets with the packaging. The contrived tagline of "Destiny Is What You Make Of It" screams "Feel Good Movie," and sure enough a brief tour of Herek's resume uncovers dreamers (Mr. Holland's Opus), overachievers (Rock Star) and time-traveling prophets bearing the benevolent message, "Be excellent to each other" (Bill & Ted's Excellent Adventure).

But I like Herek - a sort of populist Cameron Crowe - because he specializes in dreams and dreamers, yet still understands enough about pacing and characterization to prevent his films from drifting off into the stratosphere before they reach their natural conclusion. He may be light, fluffy and conventional, but his films contain an unforeseen element of stability and (as a result) respectability.

Continue reading: Life Or Something Like It Review

Grease Review


Excellent
It's the goo they put in their hair.

It's the goo they slather on their hotrod cars.

Continue reading: Grease Review

Practical Magic Review


Good
Why do titles have to be so ironic? Not to say that Practical Magic is an oxymoron, some of the camera tricks that they have are nice and neat. But the movie itself is neither practical nore magic, which it would so much like us to believe. It's not a witchcraft movie, it's not a female bonding movie, or a family movie. It's not much of a romance, it's not much of a thriller. It's not much of a PG-13 horror, either. What it is is OK. Nothing more, nothing less.

It's one of those movies that I kind of just sat through. I was a passive participant. I didn't even get to make my usual comments picking on it while I watched it (except for one). It's not a waste of your time, if you have time to kill. It's not a bad movie to take some witches to: I can say its religiously accurate. But what use is that?

Continue reading: Practical Magic Review

Must Love Dogs Review


Weak
While watching "Must Love Dogs," a romanticcomedy about moving on from divorc=E9e depression, I was sure this wouldbe a three-star review. The leads -- Diane Lane and John Cusack -- areirresistibly charismatic but accessible, the writing is wonderfully witty,and the story has a good hook: the travails of internet dating for peoplewho are still young, but too mature and serious about love for delvinginto the meat market of bars and nightclubs.

This was going to be a three-star review because of theway writer-director Gary David Goldberg (adapting Claire Cook's popularnovel) deliberately flirted with and skirted around romantic comedy cliches,making the story familiar yet fresh:

Custom boat builder Cusack and preschool teacher Lane meetearly on (in a park with borrowed dogs they both pretended to own in theirpersonal ads) and have a string of funny -- and perhaps a little too frank-- misfire dates that retain just enough chemistry to keep them both interested.But at the same time Lane, eight months out from being dumped for a youngerwoman and egged on by a family of amusingly well-intentioned busybodies,experiences bad date montages with other men. And Cusack wallows in a littleself-inflicted depression over his own divorce by watching "DoctorZhivago" at least once a day, slumped on his couch like a pile oflaundry.

This was going to be a three-star review right up untilthe movie's final five minutes, which are so much worse than any of thegenre hallmarks "Must Love Dogs" goes out of its way to set upand knock down -- so much more sappy, saccharine, ridiculous and contrived-- that it broke the picture's charming spell.

Continue reading: Must Love Dogs Review

Life Or Something Like It Review


OK

Angelina Jolie shows off the lighter side of her considerable acting talent in "Life or Something Like It," a re-prioritization comedy about an ambitious, showbiz-shallow, platinum blonde fluff reporter for a Seattle TV news station.

She revels in the savvy superficiality the part calls for (God forbid her hunky baseball star fiancé discover she wears contacts!), yet she reveals in layers a hidden depth and intelligence that her character willfully swallowed after learning to get by on her looks and feigned effervescence. The camera loves exploring Jolie's gorgeous visage for cracks in this vivacious facade, which the actress provides in subtle spades. And in her entertaining love-hate relationship with her smarmy-charmy, laid-back, flannel-clad, 5-o'clock-shadow cameraman (Edward Burns, "15 Minutes"), she delivers bitingly flirtatious rejoinders like a whip-smart dame from a Howard Hawkes movie.

"Ever heard the expression 'a picture's worth a thousand words'?" he snipes, frustrated with her interference while he's composing a shot for one of her reports.

Continue reading: Life Or Something Like It Review

Anything Else Review


Weak

Comedy writer Jerry Falk -- the narrating neurotic of Woody Allen's new dysfunctional relationship comedy "Anything Else" -- has a problem asserting himself.

"I can't leave anybody. I'm afraid to sleep alone," says Jerry (Jason Biggs) of his frustratingly sexless infatuation with Amanda (Christina Ricci), his emotionally irrational, tease-and-retreat, live-in girlfriend. He also can't leave his inept agent (a desperate Danny DeVito) or his dry, unresponsive shrink (William Hill). He's even turned down sitcom jobs in L.A. rather than sever these trying ties.

Also, Jerry can't say no. To anybody. He acquiesces to Amanda when she invites her arguably even-more-insane mother (Stockard Channing) -- freshly divorced for the seventh time -- to live in their two-room Upper East Side apartment, where she practices for her latest life-fulfilling fantasy of putting together a lounge act. And he gets pushed around by his friend David Dobel (Allen himself), a compulsively paranoid, rambling fellow comic (and schoolteacher by day) who starts off giving Jerry relationship advice and ends up trying to turn the kid into an armed army-surplus survivalist.

Continue reading: Anything Else Review

Le Divorce Review


Bad

The further away director James Ivory and producer Ishmael Merchant get from their trademarked aristocratic period pieces, like "A Room With a View" and "Howard's End," the worse their movies get. At this point, I fully expect their next film to be a futuristic sci-fi chamber drama, because that's the only way they could sink lower than "Le Divorce."

A pseudo-sophisticated sexual roundelay full of trivial characters so selfish it's a chore to spend two hours with them, this is the story of two American sisters suffering the slings and arrows of French male infidelity -- but even these women served up as the movie's heroines are worthy of very little sympathy.

Naomi Watts plays Roxy, an insecure doormat of a pregnant poetess in present-day Paris, who is in shock at the departure of Charles-Henri (Melvil Poupaud), her philandering husband who has taken up with a married Russian dancer. Just arrived from Santa Monica, her supposedly self-possessed younger sibling Isabel (Kate Hudson) is appalled at Roxy's plight -- although that doesn't stop the little hypocrite from becoming the throwaway mistress of the cheater's Uncle Edgar (Thierry Lhermitte), an arrogant right-wing politician.

Continue reading: Le Divorce Review

The Business Of Strangers Review


OK

Stockard Channing submerges herself in layers of psychological debris as an aging, pinched corporate crocodile in "The Business of Strangers," a unsettling, canny film of Machiavellian manipulation, mind games and sexual conjecture.

Going stir crazy in an posh hotel at the end of an important business trip that went awry, her fatigued and barren, Valium-fueled life of raw ambition has been flashing before her eyes when she goes to the lobby bar and comes face-to-face with an insolent young assistant (Julia Stiles) she'd fired in a snit that afternoon.

A retrospective apology lead to several rounds of drinks and a mutual recognition of their similar brash chutzpah and cold calculation of life -- and that leads to trust, which is a very dangerous emotion between people who are cold and calculating.

Continue reading: The Business Of Strangers Review

Where The Heart Is Review


Weak

Cast anyone but actress savant Natalie Portman as the pregnant, white trash teenager axis of "Where the Heart Is," and this warm-fuzzy soap opera of stock crises and Hallmark card moments would be pretty close to insufferable.

Propelled to the big screen only on the momentum of the novel's Oprah Winfrey book club endorsement, even with Portman -- who by carrying this movie proves absolutely her astounding talent -- in the lead, this low-impact unwed motherhood epic never gets any deeper than a pebble skipping across a pond.

That pebble is Novalee Nation (Portman), a near-illiterate 17-year-old abandon in the parking lot of a Sequoyah, Oklahoma, WalMart by her rat bastard boyfriend when they were supposed to be moving to California together in his $80 car.

Continue reading: Where The Heart Is Review

Bright Young Things Review


Very Good

"Bright Young Things" is a terribly witty romp through 1930s pre-war London with a pack of idle young swells who live scrumptious but superficial lives of joyous gossip-page decadence and complacent scandal that has the potential to ruin them.

Very cleverly adapted (from Evelyn Waugh's novel "Vile Bodies") and directed by the gifted comedic actor Stephen Fry ("Wilde," "Peter's Friends"), our surrogate in this world is Adam Symes (newcomer Stephen Campbell Moore), a well-connected but flat broke novelist and fringe member of this society who is railroaded into writing an anonymous gossip column about his pals -- although he's soon inventing entirely fictional members of the circle just to keep his readers amused.

An ironic failure at schemes to get rich quick so he can ask the "frantically bored" and beautiful but secretly vulnerable and melancholy Nina (subtly heartbreaking and simply wonderful Emily Mortimer) to marry him, Adam's fortunes -- which practically fluctuate with the tides -- are just one source of endless humor. But director Fry furtively hints at shades of compunction and misfortune under the film's carefree surface that bubble up as world events encroach on these lives of leisure, eventually taking the film to an unexpected level of empathy, nuance and humanity.

Continue reading: Bright Young Things Review

Stockard Channing

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Stockard Channing Movies

Sparkle Trailer

Sparkle Trailer

Sam (Shaun Evans) lives in Liverpool with his mum Jill (Lesley Manville), an aspiring singer....

3 Needles Movie Review

3 Needles Movie Review

It's exceedingly strange that 3 Needles, a lavish and dramatic film shot on three continents...

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Grease Movie Review

Grease Movie Review

It's the goo they put in their hair.It's the goo they slather on their hotrod...

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Where the Heart Is Movie Review

Where the Heart Is Movie Review

Long ago, films were constructed of strong dialogue, original characters, memorable plot points, and solid...

Isn't She Great Movie Review

Isn't She Great Movie Review

I'll start by saying up front that I really don't admire Bette Midler. I...

Le Divorce Movie Review

Le Divorce Movie Review

Two American blondes discover the joys of Paris - love, heartache, and wearing scarves in...

Moll Flanders Movie Review

Moll Flanders Movie Review

Potential taglines for this movie... Moll Flanders: Less than just a bad title....

The First Wives Club Movie Review

The First Wives Club Movie Review

The biggest crowd-pleaser of the year is upon us -- the powerhouse trio of Goldie...

The Business of Strangers Movie Review

The Business of Strangers Movie Review

Never mind the recession, business seems to be booming in the unctuous corporate world of...

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