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Steve Martin and Central Park Monday 18th June 2012 50th Anniversary Gala to Honour Al Pacino held at the Delacorte Theater in Central Park, Manhattan - Arrivals

Steve Martin and Central Park
Steve Martin and Central Park

Rascal Flatts and Steve Martin - Rascal Flatts and Steve Martin Sunday 1st April 2012 2012 ACM Awards (Academy of Country Music Awards) at the MGM Grand - Arrivals

Rascal Flatts and Steve Martin

Steve Martin Sunday 1st April 2012 2012 ACM Awards (Academy of Country Music Awards) at the MGM Grand - Outside Arrivals

Steve Martin
Steve Martin

Steve Martin Sunday 26th February 2012 2012 Vanity Fair Oscar Party at Sunset Tower Hotel - Departures

Steve Martin
Steve Martin

Steve Martin Sunday 26th February 2012 2012 Vanity Fair Oscar Party at Sunset Tower Hotel - Arrivals

Steve Martin
Steve Martin
Steve Martin

Steve Martin, Grammy Awards and Grammy Sunday 12th February 2012 54th Annual GRAMMY Awards (The Grammys) - 2012 Arrivals held at the Staples Center

Steve Martin, Grammy Awards and Grammy
Steve Martin, Grammy Awards and Grammy
Steve Martin, Grammy Awards and Grammy
Steve Martin, Grammy Awards and Grammy

Steve Martin

Steve Martin
Steve Martin and Grammy Awards

Steve Martin Monday 6th February 2012 leaves the doctors office

Steve Martin
Steve Martin
Steve Martin

Steve Martin - Steve Martin, New York City, USA - at the Ed Sullivan Theater for the 'Late Show With David Letterman' Monday 7th November 2011

Steve Martin
Steve Martin
Steve Martin
Steve Martin
Steve Martin
Steve Martin

Steve Martin and Dallas Thursday 25th August 2011 Steve Martin signs autographs after his bluegrass music concert in Dallas Dallas, Texas

Steve Martin and Dallas
Steve Martin and Dallas
Steve Martin and Dallas
Steve Martin and Dallas

Steve Martin - Friday 8th July 2011 at Hammersmith Apollo London, England

Steve Martin
Steve Martin
Steve Martin
Steve Martin
Steve Martin
Steve Martin

Steve Martin Monday 16th May 2011 The 56th Annual 'Village Voice' Obie Awards Ceremony held at Webster Hall - Press Room New York City, USA

Steve Martin

Steve Martin Monday 14th March 2011 'The Late Show with David Letterman' at the Ed Sullivan Theater - Arrivals New York City, USA

Steve Martin

Steve Martin and Vanity Fair Sunday 27th February 2011 2011 Vanity Fair Oscar Party at Sunset Tower Hotel - Arrivals West Hollywood, California

Steve Martin and Vanity Fair
Steve Martin and Vanity Fair
Steve Martin and Vanity Fair
Steve Martin and Vanity Fair

Steve Martin, Las Vegas and Texas - Larry Fitzgerald Jr, Adrian Peterson, Phil Hellmuth Jr, Steve Martin Las Vegas, Nevada - Celebrities, Poker Pros and Football Stars Raise Their Hand For Africa Texas Hold'em Charity Tournament held at The Golden Nugget Hotel and Casino Saturday 19th February 2011

Steve Martin, Las Vegas and Texas
Steve Martin, Las Vegas and Texas
Steve Martin, Las Vegas and Texas
Steve Martin, Las Vegas and Texas
Steve Martin
Steve Martin

Steve Martin Thursday 2nd December 2010 Art Basel Miami Beach at the Miami Beach Convention Center Miami, Florida

Steve Martin
Steve Martin
Steve Martin
Steve Martin
Steve Martin
Steve Martin

Steve Martin Thursday 2nd December 2010 Art Basel Miami 2010 at the Miami Beach Convention Center Miami, Florida

Steve Martin
Steve Martin
Guest and Steve Martin
Steve Martin
Steve Martin
Steve Martin

Steve Martin and John F Kennedy Tuesday 9th November 2010 12th annual Mark Twain Award for American Humor at the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts Washington DC, USA

Steve Martin and John F Kennedy
Steve Martin and John F Kennedy

Steve Martin Monday 1st November 2010 The 2010

Steve Martin
Steve Martin
Steve Martin
Steve Martin
Steve Martin

Steve Martin Monday 1st November 2010 Steve Martin, Library Lions benefit held at NYPL on 42nd Street and Fifth Avenue. New York City, USA

Steve Martin
Steve Martin
Steve Martin
Steve Martin
Steve Martin

Steve Martin Wednesday 9th December 2009 the New York premiere of 'It's Complicated' at The Paris Theatre New York City, USA

Steve Martin
Steve Martin

Steve Martin Wednesday 9th December 2009 The New York premiere of 'It's Complicated' at The Paris Theatre - Outside Arrivals New York City, USA

Steve Martin

Steve Martin and David Letterman Monday 5th October 2009 outside the Ed Sullivan Theater for the 'Late Show With David Letterman' New York City, USA

Steve Martin and David Letterman
Steve Martin and David Letterman
Steve Martin and David Letterman
Steve Martin and David Letterman

Steve Martin Friday 3rd July 2009 Steve Martin outside the Ivy restaurant carrying a copy of his CD 'The Crow: New Songs for the Five-String Banjo' London, England

Steve Martin
Steve Martin

Steve Martin and American Idol Wednesday 20th May 2009 The American Idol Season 8 Finale held at the Nokia Theater - Arrivals Los Angeles, California

Steve Martin and American Idol
Steve Martin and American Idol

The Lonely Guy Review


Excellent
Before Arthur Hiller lost his mind and his talent, he produced this oddball Steve Martin flick, wherein an oblivious cuckold of a boyfriend is dumped by his girlfriend and quickly becomes a "lonely guy," '80s parlance for a loser bachelor. With pal Charles Grodin (wonderful here), he explores the bar scene, pick-up artistry, and the world of the house plant before writing a bestseller about his experiences and making it big. Funny stuff, though Martin's soliloquies to the camera get a little tiresome.

The Pink Panther (2006) Review


Bad
ABC premiered America's Funniest Home Videos in 1989, and the weekly video-clip competition has gone on to become the network's longest-running comedy series. Amazingly, very little has changed since that debut show. Videos rides one predominant joke all the way to the finish line each week - people get hurt on camera, and audiences howl.

The full-contact humor propagated by the program obviously appeals to the masses. The simple formula has worked on Videos for 17 years now. So why, then, am I still surprised when a preview audience sitting through something as moronic as The Pink Panther bursts out laughing when a cyclist crashes into a car door or a senior citizen takes a blunt object to the skull?

Continue reading: The Pink Panther (2006) Review

Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band Review


Good
No, this isn't a Beatles film like A Hard Day's Night, released in conjunction with the eponymous album and telling a vague sort of story. Rather, Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band came out 11 years after the seminal Beatles record. And it doesn't star the Beatles. In fact, it's one of the most bizarre films ever made, with the Bee Gees (who have no dialogue) appearing as the titular band, who acts through a series of vignettes based on songs that appear on the titular record (and some off of Abbey Road, too). Story-wise, there's really not much here -- basically it's about a small band's rise to fame and subsequent fight against the evil, corporate music business. And I mean basically. Really it's excuse to hear Beatles covers from the Brothers Gibb, Peter Frampton, Sandy Farina, Aerosmith (who pioneered their "Come Together" version here), Steve Martin(!), and George Burns(!!), who narrates the proceedings. And the music is really good, too. Never mind the "story."

Fantasia/2000 Review


Very Good
Little known fact: When Walt Disney released Fantasia in 1940, it was intended to be a permanent work in progress. Each time you saw it, you would see something new combined with something old and familiar.

It didn't quite happen that way. The original Fantasia became a classic, although a static one. 60 years later, that's about to change. With the release of Fantasia/2000 we get eight animations set to music: seven new pieces and one classic. Oh, and this time it's presented on IMAX -- the first ever animated feature for the large format.

Continue reading: Fantasia/2000 Review

The Muppet Movie Review


Excellent
Like most movies of its year, The Muppet Movie looks (and is) really dated. But it's worth it to willingly suspend disbelief at how dated it is --- to appreciate the good-natured humor and comedic flair of Jim Henson. Henson tried to entertain both kids and adults, and though both audiences were probably easier to please in the days before all comedy became irony-soaked, Henson was one of the first to add sly postmodern touches. And while the movie promotes the annoying myth of Hollywood as the dream factory, magic store, etc. it more than makes up for it by borrowing comedians from several generations, from then-new comics like Steve Martin and Elliott Gould to veterans like Bob Hope and Orson Welles(!), for an endless string of cameo appearances.

The plot loosely follows the odyssey of Kermit the Frog from his swamp home to Hollywood in search of celebrity. The desirability of fame and stardom is never questioned. The Hollywood worship becomes pretty maudlin at the end, thanks mainly to songwriter Paul Williams, whose songs are palatable at first ("Rainbow Connection" was a hit) but become too much before the end of the movie.

Continue reading: The Muppet Movie Review

Joe Gould's Secret Review


Very Good
When Mel Brooks played the Louis XVI in The History of the World, Part I, he often commented, "It's good to be the King." Joe Gould, a voluntarily homeless man, thinks that it's good to be the Bum... and it shows.

Joe Gould spends his days in Greenwich Village, making notes on the subject of humanity. He is compiling an oral history of mankind, a series of transcripts of conversations and essays on the nature of man. He does this by writing at every opportunity in composition books and by mooching off of rich Beatniks during the 50s in New York City. Amongst his supporters: painter Alice Neel (Susan Sarandon), E.E. Cummings, gallery owner Vivian Marquie (Patricia Clarkson) and publishing executive Charlie Duell (Steve Martin). These supporters frequently allow Joe Gould to stay at their homes, as well as contribute small sums of money to the Joe Gould fund.

Continue reading: Joe Gould's Secret Review

Bowfinger Review


Good
It's round two for Heather Graham. Will she make it in comedy? Or will she drag the genre down in flames? Unlike her earlier attempt at yucking it up just a few months ago in Austin Powers 2, Graham is actually pretty good here, as are all the principals. Imagine my surprise when, ultimately, Bowfinger just doesn't gel the way a good comedy should, although it certainly has some merit.

The problem isn't the premise: Never-has-been, aging filmmaker Bobby Bowfinger (Martin) is so desperate to make a movie, he decides to film impromptu scenes with major, but paranoid, star Kit Ramsey (Murphy, basically playing himself). Wackiness ensues when the scenes (a sci-fi action film) get crazier and crazier. Sounds like a good plot to me.

Continue reading: Bowfinger Review

Grand Canyon Review


Very Good
Lawrence Kasdan's Grand Canyon is as enigmatic as movies get. On the one hand, it's got a great cast, an ominous soundtrack, and Steve Martin burning through some of the best monologues on film ("All of life's riddles are answered in the movies!"). On the other hand, Kasdan's film is so hopeless and despairing that it's hard to ever properly embrace: In the space of two hours, Kasdan's characters get shot at, murdered, nearly carjacked, nearly seduced into adulterous affairs, shot for real, discover abandoned babies, and generally bemoan the horrors of modern life. Kasdan is intent on getting one point across and one only: America has gone to the dogs, as exemplified by the horrors of Los Angeles.

Continue reading: Grand Canyon Review

Little Shop Of Horrors Review


Good
Little Shop of Horrors is a curiously detached musical comedy based on the popular 1980's off-Broadway play about a man-eating plant from outer space. Not exactly a thought provoking subject, although some of the movie works; it's just too bad even more of it does not. I saw the play, and even performed in an amateur version. Throughout the movie, I was singing along with some of the musical numbers, but found myself standing outside of the story. Maybe that's because this is about a man-eating plant from outer space. I hold nothing against movies about man-eating plants from outer space, but this one doesn't know how to handle such.

The movie is a solid adaptation; beyond some alterations at the end after test audiences complained (they should have complained even more), the movie is very similar to the play. Most of the songs remain intact, and the cast is full of energy and zest. The special effects fill an important niche. So why does so much of Little Shop of Horrors feel distant and wearisome?

Continue reading: Little Shop Of Horrors Review

Cheaper By The Dozen Review


Weak
Can someone please pull Steve Martin's career out of the past? Once wild and crazy, Martin's now mild and lazy, a cookie-cutter comedian content to milk mediocre laughs out of reheated remakes of classic flicks. Results vary. Martin's Father of the Bride stayed sweet, while his updated The Out-of-Towners struck a surprisingly unpleasant chord.

Now there's Cheaper by the Dozen, a stale take on Walter Lang's 1950s farce of the same name that is based on the real-life story of Frank and Lillian Gilbreth, the parents of 12 children. Here the original Gilbreth becomes Thomas Baker (Martin). Get it? A Baker's dozen? No, the jokes don't get much better than that one, unless you laugh when an athletic supporter lands in a pot of spaghetti sauce and Martin bellows, "Pasta de la crotch!"

Continue reading: Cheaper By The Dozen Review

Dead Men Don't Wear Plaid Review


Very Good
Steve Martin's homage to the 1940s and 50s is a one-joke movie that wears thin after 45 minutes (in which Martin inserts himself into classic film noirs, often in drag, where he turns the melodrama into comedy). Fortunately, the laughs are plentiful enough throughout to make Dead Men Don't Wear Plaid worthwhile both as an homage to the greats of the past and as a strictly Martinesque comedy. The biggest shock: Rachel Ward steals the show as the straight guy to Martin's goofball, as a wealthy damsel who can suck the bullet out of a wound -- a trick she learned "at camp."

The Out-of-Towners (1999) Review


OK
While this remake of the 1970 Jack Lemmon film of the same name (not a classic, by the way) comes off as something of a perverse cross between Steve Martin's own Planes, Trains, and Automobiles and Adventures in Babysitting, it has enough silly giggles in it to make it better than, say, watching UPN on a Wednesday night. And though Goldie Hawn is seen in what might be the worst role in her entire life, Martin's schtick is somehow timeless and tireless.

Father Of The Bride Review


Good
It's really hard to feel too terribly sorry for the uptight George Banks (Steve Martin) when he bitches and moans about the ever-rising costs of his daughter's wedding in Father of the Bride. After all, he lives in overstuffed opulence in a Pasadena mini-mansion, runs his own company, drives an antique sports car, has a perfect and gainfully employed wife (Diane Keaton), and two perfect kids (Kimberly Williams and Kieran Culkin). Is the wedding cake outrageously expensive? Get over it, George.

In fact, that's what wife Nina (Keaton) spends most of the movie saying. And that's what you'll be saying, too, as George whines about having to buy a tuxedo, mopes about the disruption to the house, disapproves of the perfect young man (George Newbern) who has deflowered his daughter, and gets all frantic about meeting his future in-laws (who are even richer than he is). What's really happening, of course, is that George simply doesn't want his daughter to grow up, and his way of raging against life's forward progression is to get cranky about the upcoming wedding day. How do we know? Because George tells us in his self-pitying narration. This is the kind of movie that has plenty of both show and tell.

Continue reading: Father Of The Bride Review

Planes, Trains & Automobiles Review


Essential
In 1987 John Hughes took a huge risk. The man who had spent three years profiling the lives of teenagers did the unthinkable: He wrote and directed two movies featuring adults: She's Having a Baby and Planes, Trains & Automobiles.

She's Having a Baby is a pleasant comedy, but PTA is an absolute gem and one of the 1980s' most overlooked movies, a mixture of human drama and dizzying goofiness that qualifies it for timeless status. I should know. A co-worker and I continually quote lines from this 17-year-old movie. At this point we could audition for a remake.

Continue reading: Planes, Trains & Automobiles Review

The Jerk Review


Excellent
One of Steve Martin's proto-characters, The Jerk isn't quite what his name suggests, he's really more of an idiot than a jerk. "Born a poor black man," the film follows his misadventures from the sharecrop farm to the big city, the circus, Hollywood, and ultimately fabulous wealth and bankruptcy, oblivious all the way. Ultimately he really does turn from sheer ignorant to wilfully awful, so maybe he's a jerk too... but that's beside the point. Martin's one-liners are pretty funny, very dry, and awfully quotable. Bernadette Peters, as the love of his life, appears in one of her most memorable roles, too.

Bringing Down The House Review


Very Good
More than a decade after Steve Martin lost control of his own home in Housesitter, another of his patented Poor Sap characters is in similar trouble. This time, instead of a spunky, conniving Goldie Hawn acting as unwanted tenant, a sassy, street-smart, badass Queen Latifah is movin' on up. Thankfully, Martin and Latifah make for a good high-concept Hollywood odd couple that keeps all races and ages laughing, in director Adam Shankman's speedy, funky -- and politically incorrect -- comedy.

Martin, in a plain, white guy role that's getting a bit tired, is tax attorney Peter Sanderson. He's got a fairly palatial suburban home, an ex-wife, two kids... and a chat room buddy named "lawyergirl." Peter quickly learns that making friends on the Internet can be a bitch -- his dream girl ends up being an ex-con named Charlene (Latifah), a sly loudmouth who's served time for armed robbery. Through some not-so-gentle blackmail, Charlene enlists Peter's legal aid and moves into his house and life.

Continue reading: Bringing Down The House Review

Novocaine Review


Very Good
Writer-director David Atkins presents what may be one of the slickest and most skillful black comedies of the year in the blistering thriller Novocaine. Atkins cleverly drills in the point that there's more to the decaying of one's existence besides rotten gums, serving up a filling of macabre antics surrounding the world of dentistry. And what better way to convey the sardonic wit and quirkiness of his storyline than to feature manic and sharp-edged comic actor Steve Martin as doomed dentist Frank Sangster? Martin previously played another wacky smock-wearing oral surgeon in the musical comedy Little Shop of Horrors, but as Dr. Sangster, Martin gets to more fully explore the mischievous and seedily outlandish scope of Atkins's crackling imagination.

Dr. Sangster seemingly has things under control in his life. Frank has a thriving dental practice and is even engaged to his efficient hygienist Jean (Laura Dern). Still, with everything going to plan, Frank cannot help but feel receptive to any sort of shake-up to his routine. Just once, he would like to stir things up a bit in an effort to get out of his rut. Frank even wants to engage in some kinky practices in the dental chair, but Jean won't accommodate him. Hence, Frank is left with a hankering naughty urge to satisfy.

Continue reading: Novocaine Review

L.A. Story Review


Excellent
Steve Martin's treatise on Los Angeles vapidity (and how love can be the same way) is lighthearted yet plenty of fun, even though its satire is often ridiculously over the top -- most notably when Steve Martin's TV weatherman records his segments in advance so he can get away for the weekend. (Choreographed gas station attendants aren't much more subtle.) The fun is contagious, and the movie's worth seeing for its innumerable cameos, fun supporting roles, and clever jokes. If nothing else, it will remind you how funny Martin used to be.

Shopgirl Review


Very Good
Based on his movies and comedy, Steve Martin appears to truly hate Los Angeles. And yet he keeps coming back here to make movies about how the city makes people so uncommonly fulfilled. It's love and hate. Passive and aggressive. Come to think of it, that's a lot like his new film Shopgirl.

Based on a 130-page story by Martin that is commonly termed a novella, Shopgirl is about a Saks 5th Avenue glove counter clerk named Mirabelle (Claire Danes). There's not much call for gloves in Los Angeles, so Mirabelle spends most of her days expressionlessly leaning against the glass, waiting for life to start. By night, she occasionally sketches a nude picture of herself: She's also an artist, again waiting to be discovered.

Continue reading: Shopgirl Review

The Spanish Prisoner Review


Extraordinary
"What I learned while watching The Spanish Prisoner," by Christopher Null.

1. Don't trust nobody.

Continue reading: The Spanish Prisoner Review

Bringing Down The House Review


Weak

Toothlessly trite and inundated with a relentlessly chirpy elevator-music score, "Bringing Down the House" is a ghetto-woman-in-the-ritzy-white-suburbs culture-clash comedy sanitized to oblige the same middle-aged white folks that are the butts of most of its jokes.

It's about an uptight, overworked, miserably divorced tax attorney (a hammy yet vanilla Steve Martin) whose life is turned upside down when a woman he'd flirted with in a legal-forum online chatroom turns up on his doorstep for a date not looking anything like the sophisticated, young white lawyer she'd pretended to be. She is, in fact, a feisty, girthy, street-smart spitfire straight outta Compton (and played with relish by Queen Latifah) who has just escaped from prison and wants Martin's help proving her innocence on an erroneous armed robbery charge.

The movie would have little plot if these two didn't spend the next five reels trying to hoodwink Martin's neighbors and law partners into thinking the loud-and-proud Latifah is a nanny or a maid -- telling lie on top of outrageous lie when a simple variation on the truth ("She's an acquaintance that I'm helping with a case") would have sufficed.

Continue reading: Bringing Down The House Review

Novocaine Review


Bad

I apologize in advance for the hokey dental metaphors, but I can't help myself: The incisive plot of the black comedy "Novocaine" is more decayed than a candy-addicted 10-year-old's teeth.

Driven by a conspiracy of preposterous complexity, it is mock-noirish downward-spiral drivel about a dull DDS (Steve Martin) whose too-perfect life is upended when he flips for a junkie femme fatale patient (Helena Bonham Carter). Dumbstruck by out-of-character desire that goes unexplored and unexplained, the dentist gives the burned-out babe a generous prescription of Demerol. The next day there's been a break-in at his office -- all the narcotics are gone and there's a sweater-vested DEA wonk in the waiting room.

Martin lies to protect this girl, who came to his office only once and seduced him with a toothache. Then his life starts to unravel -- starting with his engagement to his blithe but insanely obsessive-compulsive hygienist (Laura Dern). Soon he's confronting a collusion involving Bonham Carter's violent cokehead brother (Scott Caan) and his own willful slacker sibling (Elias Koteas), who has recently invited himself to crash on Martin's Italian leather sofa and pilfer from the dentist's pill box as well. But that's only the beginning of the Machiavellian machination making its way into Martin's life.

Continue reading: Novocaine Review

The Out-Of-Towners Review


Bad

How someone can take a screenplay by Neil Simon and turn it into a movieas bad as this Steve Martin-Goldie Hawn remake of "The Out-of-Towners"is beyond my cognitive capacities.

I wouldn't qualify Simon as a literary genius, but he isfunny. The original "Out-of-Towners," a passable country mousein the big city comedy which he wrote, starred Jack Lemmon and Sandy Dennisas a pair of Ohio rubes having a Murphy's Law vacation in the Big Applewhile Lemmon sweats a big-time job interview. It was good for a jaded,yet wholesome, laugh.

Continue reading: The Out-Of-Towners Review

Cheaper By The Dozen Review


Weak

Is anybody else getting tired of doofus dad comedies? I don't know about you, but I'm pretty sure I've seen every emasculating joke there could be about stereotypically incompetent men being left alone with their kids and bungling everything while their wives are away. But here comes "Cheaper by the Dozen" anyway.

A loose remake of a 1950 laffer about a huge turn-of-the-century family headed by a stern efficiency expert, this version spends its opening voice-over explaining how Tom and Kate Baker (Steve Martin and Bonnie Hunt) ended up with 12 kids in this age of easy contraception before it launches into a multiple helping of the same old themes of clueless parents and kiddie chaos.

Escaped pet frogs and butt-biting dogs abound even before the plot kicks in, seeing the family move from their rural Illinois homestead to the hustle and bustle of Chicago when Dad, now a college football coach (in an abandonment of the original's most essential ingredient), is offered his dream job heading the team at his Division One alma mater.

Continue reading: Cheaper By The Dozen Review

Bowfinger Review


OK

Steve Martin's second sacchariney satire of life in L.A., "Bowfinger" is a junk food comedy, packed with instant gratification laughs that fade away almost immediately after the credits roll.

An often hilarious mockery of the film industry written by its star, the movie gets its giggles by lampooning tantrum-prone A-list actors, Scientology, cell phone culture and the fine line between $90-million action movies and the unmitigated stupidity of B-grade monster flicks, among other things.

Martin plays Bobby Bowfinger, a desperate, middle-aged slouch of a movie maker with a dead-end career who has grafted an ionic column facade onto his run down, freeway-adjacent stucco bungalow home/office in an attempt to give it the grandiose air of a studio entrance.

Continue reading: Bowfinger Review

Looney Tunes: Back In Action Review


Good

There's nothing more satisfying as a movie critic than going into a screening with low expectations and coming out tickled pink and grinning ear to ear, which is exactly what happened to me when I saw "Looney Tunes: Back in Action."

Fully anticipating another gimmick-driven shoulder-shrug of a live-action/cartoon hybrid like 1996's "Space Jam," I hadn't put enough faith in director Joe Dante ("Gremlins," "Small Soldiers"), who has been a rabid aficionado of Warner Bros. cartoons his whole life, and who poured every ounce of that enthusiasm into this screwball flick.

Although it gets off to a weak start with a studio board meeting where the humans are worse actors than the cartoons (and interact with them unconvincingly), after it sluffs off its clumsy plot establishing -- in which Daffy Duck is fired by the suits -- it becomes as truly looney-tooney as a fan of classic Warner shorts could ever dream of.

Continue reading: Looney Tunes: Back In Action Review

Steve Martin

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Steve Martin

Date of birth

14th August, 1945

Occupation

Actor

Sex

Male

Height

1.83






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Steve Martin Movies

Love the Coopers (aka Christmas With the Coopers) Movie Review

Love the Coopers (aka Christmas With the Coopers) Movie Review

This may look like it's going to be a zany Christmas romp, but it's really...

Home Movie Review

Home Movie Review

A sharp script and especially colourful imagery make this animated romp a lot more fun...

Home Trailer

Home Trailer

The overly-confident alien race, the Boov, have faced some difficulties in their time, but they've...

Home Trailer

Home Trailer

Captain Smek is the leader of a group of aliens called Boov who are stranded...

The Big Year Movie Review

The Big Year Movie Review

Even though it's rather corny and sentimental, this colourful comedy-drama holds our interest mainly because...

The Big Year Trailer

The Big Year Trailer

Brad Harris is having what he calls a 'no-life crisis'. He is stuck in a...

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It's Complicated Trailer

It's Complicated Trailer

Watch the trailer for It's Complicated Jane is a successful middle aged divorcee who owns...

The Pink Panther 2 Movie Review

The Pink Panther 2 Movie Review

Back in the fun, free-basing '70s, Steve Martin was a stand-up comic god. Me Decade...

Pink Panther 2 Trailer

Pink Panther 2 Trailer

Watch the trailer for Pink Panther 2 The Pink Panther 2 is a sequel to...

The Pink Panther (2006) Movie Review

The Pink Panther (2006) Movie Review

ABC premiered America's Funniest Home Videos in 1989, and the weekly video-clip competition has gone...

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