Steve Cochran

Steve Cochran

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Il Grido Review


OK
One of many duds from Michelangelo Antonioni, this time a two hour affair with a laborer who gets dumped by his married girlfriend after her husband dies, then takes off on an inexplicable road trip to find himself. Which he never does. In typical Neorealist fashion, Steve Cochran's Aldo bumbles from bad to worse, eventually croaking after two full hours of misery. Not much artistry is exhibited along the way; other Italian films from the 1950s have told this story ("Life sucks.") with more aplomb.

The Damned Don't Cry Review


Good
Crawford is absolute fine in The Damned Don't Cry, but the film isn't entirely memorable on the whole. Crawford opens the film implicated in a murder. Flashbacks (courtesy of cliched, over-eager police interrogators) reveal her life story as she claws her way through man after man to get to the top, baby! Naturally she winds up involved with the mob, while we are left to shudder at her poor decision-making ability.

Copacabana Review


OK
Marx and Miranda!?

That's right: The cigar meets the fruit basket headdress in a bizarre slapstick musical, with Groucho starring as an agent who convinces his only client (Miranda) to masquerade as two nightclub singers so she can get double pay.

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White Heat Review


Excellent
Norman Bates had nothing on Cody Jarrett. When it comes to love for his mother, Cody (James Cagney) and Ma (Margaret Wycherly) are as thick as thieves... which they are all well. The Jarrett gang is a merciless group led by the unflinchingly evil Cody. Even when Cody is in jail -- as he is for half the film -- he's still running the gang without missing a beat.

Cagney had been out of the gangster scene for nearly a decade, but he made his triumphant return to the genre here in one of his most memorable roles ever. It's got little to do with the plot, however. Cody's gang plans a big heist, while an undercover cop infiltrates his gang in prison, after saving Cody from an assassination attempt. Finally, once Cody is out and the heist is underway, the "copper" betrayal is revealed, and things go south as the cops close in (very slowly -- during a 15-minute sequence with the cops using directional radios to locate the car they're driving -- it must've been a crazy high-tech idea at the time, but the rotating antennae and map plotting come off as tediously dull today).

Continue reading: White Heat Review

Steve Cochran

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