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Norman: The Moderate Rise and Tragic Fall of a New York Fixer - Trailer and Clip


Norman Oppenheimer is a New York based hustler determined to climb the social ladder and make connections with all the important people. It's never really clear why he's so desperate to do often dubious favours for people of the elite that he barely knows, but he certainly uses his meetings as ammunition during social occasions, name-dropping where he can and wheedling his way into conversations that might benefit him in the future. He does everything he can to ensure that people meet and remember him, even if that means chasing people down on their morning jog or breaking into their homes. Nobody really knows the truth about his job, his background or even his family, but one thing that's for sure is that his life is about to be turned upside down after a down-and-out young politician he met three years ago becomes the Prime Minister of Israel.

Continue: Norman: The Moderate Rise and Tragic Fall of a New York Fixer - Trailer and Clip

You Can Now Own Awesome Props From HBO's 'Boardwalk Empire'!


HBO Steve Buscemi Jack Huston Michael K. Williams Shea Whigham

Ever wanted to own the iconic mask worn by Jack Huston's Richard Harrow in 'Boardwalk Empire'? What about the suit worn by Steve Buscemi's Nucky Thompson in the series' opening title sequence? Well, due to an auction currently run by Screenbid, you can own these very items as well as hundreds more like them.

'Boardwalk Empire' ran for five seasons between 2010 and 2014.
'Boardwalk Empire' ran for five seasons between 2010 and 2014.

'Boardwalk Empire' concluded its fifth and final series late last year, leaving HBO with a tone of props and costumes knocking around. Lucking, Screenbid was able to come to the rescue, offering to sell off the props and costumes from some of your favourite prohibition gangsters and bootleggers at an auction, running from 20th to 29th January 2015. 

Continue reading: You Can Now Own Awesome Props From HBO's 'Boardwalk Empire'!

Video - Sarah Jessica Parker And AOL CEO Pose Together At The 2014 AOL NewFront - Part 1


'Sex And The City' star Sarah Jessica Parker was spotted posing alongside AOL CEO Tim Armstrong on the red carpet at the 2014 AOL NewFront event held at the Duggal Greenhouse in New York. AOL is a mass media company that invests in brands and websites.

Continue: Video - Sarah Jessica Parker And AOL CEO Pose Together At The 2014 AOL NewFront - Part 1

HBO's 'Boardwalk Empire' To Finish After Season 5


Steve Buscemi Bobby Cannavale

Boardwalk Empire will conclude with its fifth and final season, due to air on premium cable network HBO this fall. The move to bring the show to an end was revealed just this week, with The Hollywood Reporter confirming the news on Thursday, 9 January.

Boardwalk Empire
Boardwalk Empire has been consistently successful throughout its run

"It has been an incredible honor to bring this powerful and groundbreaking series to our subscribers," programming president Michael Lombardo said in a network statement (via THR). "Terry Winter has created one for the ages."

Continue reading: HBO's 'Boardwalk Empire' To Finish After Season 5

May The Glitz And Murder Continue, Boardwalk Empire Season 5 Gets Green Light


Steve Buscemi Stephen Graham Kelly MacDonald

Boardwalk Empire is only three episodes in to season four, but HBO have decided the people want more, and have ordered a fifth season of the stylish prohibition drama. Deadline had the scoop, and the statement to go with it.

Boardwalk EmpireBoardwalk Empire Will Return For Season 5

“Thanks to Terry Winter, Martin Scorsese, Tim Van Patten, Howard Korder and their stellar team, Boardwalk Empire remains in a class by itself,” said Michael Lombardo, president, HBO Programming in a statement Thursday. “I look forward to another electrifying season of this impeccably crafted series.”

Continue reading: May The Glitz And Murder Continue, Boardwalk Empire Season 5 Gets Green Light

The Cast Of 'Boardwalk Empire' Tell Us What's In Store For Season 4


Steve Buscemi Ron Livingston Jeffrey Wright Patricia Arquette Bobby Cannavale Gretchen Mol

This Sunday, 8 September, we'll be heading back to the 1920's when Boardwalk Empire returns for it's fourth season. The Golden Globe-winning crime drama will return to see crime lord Enoch 'Nucky' Thompson (Steve Buscemi) pick up the pieces of last season, and with a trio of new faces - Jeffrey Wright, Ron Livingston and Patricia Arquette - the upcoming season may just be the most exciting one yet.

Steve Buscemi
Steve Buscemi is back as Enoch 'Nucky' Thompson

Set at the height of Prohibition in 1924, this season will see Nucky attempt to reassert his dominance over Atlantic City follow the epic power struggle between himself and Gyp Rosetti (Bobby Cannavale). Buscemi and his new cast-mates spoke to reporters at the premiere screening of the first episode of the fourth season, detailing the moonshine-laden path that the upcoming episodes will have in store for their respective characters.

Continue reading: The Cast Of 'Boardwalk Empire' Tell Us What's In Store For Season 4

Boardwalk Empire Season 4 Date Announced – The Story So Far


Steve Buscemi Stephen Graham Michael K. Williams

That’s right, the prohibition drama featuring the likes of Steve Buscemi and Stephen Graham is coming back on Sunday, September 8th, 2013. That’s a date for the diary if there ever was one.

Problem is - unless you’ve the time to re-watch season 3 before September, or you took notes, which you didn’t – there’ll be things you’ve forgotten. No fear, because here’s a recap of season 3’s highlights, and what we’re looking forward to in season 4. Spoilers, come on.

The main plotline in the show’s third season was the war between Gyp Rosetti (‎Bobby Cannavale) and Nucky Thompson. Luckily, for Nucky, his allies included Al Capone and Chalky White – masterfully portrayed by Stephen Graham and Michael K Williams respectively. This culminated in a tense but ultimately satisfactory season finale for Nucky, who took down Rosetti with a little help from his friends.

Continue reading: Boardwalk Empire Season 4 Date Announced – The Story So Far

Monsters University Trailer


All Mike Wazowski dreams of is graduating from the prestigious Monsters University and becoming one of the world's best scarers. However, college doesn't go as swimmingly as he'd hoped, especially when he crosses paths with the large, hairy and extremely arrogant James P. 'Sulley' Sullivan who is also majoring in scaring and becomes his roommate. They are constantly attempting to get one up on each other and their competitiveness puts them seriously under threat of getting removed from the University's Scare Program. In order to stay on the course and graduate, they must work as a team in the dangerous Scare Games alongside their not so competent friends, the Oozma Kappa. With Mike and Sulley being total opposites of each other, they each possess what the other is missing which makes them, in theory, the perfect dream team.

Continue: Monsters University Trailer

Steve Buscemi Goes Bowling With Vampire Weekend [Video]


Steve Buscemi Vampire Weekend

The second episode in the Steve Buscemi/Vampire Weekend series of comedy clips - in support of their American Express-sponsored collaboration at New York's Roseland Ballroom on April 28 - is now online. It sees Buscemi once again playing a sort of hapless out-of-touch version of himself, trying to promote the show with some, err, guerrilla marketing techniques. Mainly hastily printed posters.

The new video begins with the Boardwalk Empire actor handing out flyers on a subway train, before he and band head to Brooklyn's Melody Lanes bowling alley where they approach patrons about the show. "If you love rap, you'll those these," Buscemi tells one frizzy haired youth. Things get uncomfortable when drummer Chris Tomson makes badly timed Big Lebowski reference, leading Buscemi to ask, "Is he speaking in Polish or something?"

Continue reading: Steve Buscemi Goes Bowling With Vampire Weekend [Video]

A Week In Movies:Carell, Buscemi And Carrey Get Magical, Danny Boyle Back With Ewan McGregor And A First Glimpse Of Bling Ring


Steve Carell Steve Buscemi Jim Carrey James McAvoy Ewan McGregor Steve Coogan Jason Bateman Emma Watson Leslie Mann Gavin Rossdale

Burt Wonderstone

The big global release this week is the comedy pastiche The Incredible Burt Wonderstone, starring Steve Carell, Steve Buscemi, Jim Carrey and Alan Arkin as Las Vegas musicians in a battle between old-school illusions and street-magic stunts. Warm and funny, it's also just as silly as you think it'll be.

In between performances as Macbeth on London's West End stage, James McAvoy has been out promoting his new film Welcome to the Punch, an unusually glossy cop thriller set in East London. The film opens this weekend in the UK. Speaking to Contactmusic, he talks about how making action movies is a breeze, and why he prefers to work in Britain if he has the chance. Until a new X-men movie comes up, that is.

Continue reading: A Week In Movies:Carell, Buscemi And Carrey Get Magical, Danny Boyle Back With Ewan McGregor And A First Glimpse Of Bling Ring

Steve Carell Hails 'Genius' David Copperfield In Burt Wonderstone Interview (Video)


Steve Carell Steve Buscemi Jim Carrey David Copperfield

Steve Carell paid tribute to legendary magician David Copperfield while talking to Contactmusic.com about his latest comedy 'The Incredible Burt Wonderstone,' with Jim Carrey and Steve Buscemi. Copperfield served as a creative consultant on the movie, about superstar magicians Burt Wonderstone and Anton Marvelton, who look to salvage their act by staging their own daring stunt.

On working with Copperfield - the most commercially successful magician in history having grossed over $3 billion - Carell said, "Well he's a legend.to have him.in a movie about his world. He's a historian.he designed a trick for us [and] we had to sign a waiver [secrecy document]." 

Continue reading: Steve Carell Hails 'Genius' David Copperfield In Burt Wonderstone Interview (Video)

Steve Buscemi - Video Interview


Video Interview with Steve Buscemi

Steve Buscemi talks about the characters and the actors at a press junket for his new movie 'The Incredible Burt Wonderstone' in which he plays Anton Marvelton; a character he describes as being happy to carry on in the magic business as he is alongside Burt, despite their dwindling ticket sales for magic shows.

He mentions how he thinks his and Steve Carell's characters' break-up in the movie was 'the best thing to happen to them' and he appears to have nothing but praise for his comedy co-star.

Burt Wonderstone wanted to be a superstar magician ever since he was a young boy watching his idol Rance Holloway perform tricks on TV. Enlisting his best friend Anton Marvelton as his partner, the pair became stars beyond their wildest dreams wowing audiences in Las Vegas for the best part of 30 years. However, after a while being the biggest magic stars in America, ticket sales begin to drop and the pair find themselves drifting apart from each other. It doesn't help that a young, charismatic new street magician called Steve Gray has arrived on the scene becoming a massive hit among young magic fans. After Burt and Anton embark on a new stunt, attempting to stay suspended in a box with each other, they realise that their friendship is long forgotten and Anton moves abroad. Burt must meet with his hero Rance and reconnect with what made him love magic in the first place in order to reunite with his friend once more.

Continue reading: Steve Buscemi - Video Interview

A Week In Movies: Argo Keeps On Coming, Spring Breakers Looks Unhinged And Carell, Buscemi And Carrey Appear In Incredible Burt Wonderstone Trailer


James Franco Ben Affleck Selena Gomez Vanessa Hudgens Ashley Benson Lindsay Lohan Steve Carell Steve Buscemi Jim Carrey Alden Ehrenreich Alice Englert Emma Thompson Jeremy Irons Viola Davis

Argo Still

PGA's And SAG Awards Both Favour Affleck While Selena Gomez, Vanessa Hudgens And Ashley Benson Spring Break And Lindsay Lohan's The Canyons Bombs Out

The Oscar race was thrown into a spin last weekend by two guilds, professional groups that make movies and vote for the Academy Awards. First, the Producers Guild of America (PGA) gave its Best Picture award to Ben Affleck's Argo, a surprise because Affleck isn't even nominated for a directing Oscar. Then the Screen Actors Guild (SAG) named Argo for Best Ensemble, which is considered their Best Picture prize. Films only rarely win the Best Picture Oscar if their director isn't nominated. But Affleck is nominated for a Directors Guild of America (DGA) award on Saturday, which will no doubt further muddy the waters leading to Bafta night February 10th and the Oscars two weeks later.

Meanwhile, Oscar contenders dominate the box office, with Les Miserables, Django Unchained and Zero Dark Thirty in the Top 10 both in America and Britain. In addition, Life of Pi and Lincoln are in the UK chart, while Silver Linings Playbook is holding firm in the US. These are the most money-making Best Picture nominees in years.

Continue reading: A Week In Movies: Argo Keeps On Coming, Spring Breakers Looks Unhinged And Carell, Buscemi And Carrey Appear In Incredible Burt Wonderstone Trailer

Boardwalk Empire Season 3 Finale Recap; Spoilers Everywhere!


Steve Buscemi Bobby Cannavale Gretchen Mol Jack Huston Stephen Graham

The long awaited Boardwalk Empire season 3 finale aired last night, giving us closure on what has been a tense and sometimes tedious season from HBO's prohibition drama. And while it didn't arrest our expectations, 'Margaret Sands' was a finely tuned conclusion to an increasingly teetering plotline: Gyp Rossetti v Nucky Thompson. 

I mean, who really thought Nucky would be overcome, relinquishing control of his beloved Atlantic City? Perhaps the sudden death of Owen Sleater, just before he was set to live his long and happy life with Margaret in the penultimate episode served a welcome shock, but in reality, this finale simply played out a story we all would have guessed. The cunning Nucky wriggled his way out, Rossetti's bullish and impatient style proved his downfall, and Richard Harrow saved the son he never had, Tommy, from a life of drugs, sex and death.

Continue reading: Boardwalk Empire Season 3 Finale Recap; Spoilers Everywhere!

Steve Buscemi and Bryant Park Tuesday 13th November 2012 'Comes a Bright Day' Premiere at The Bryant Park Hotel

Steve Buscemi Friday 28th September 2012 attends Stanley Tucci and Felicity Blunt's pre-wedding drinks gathering at Shoreditch House

Steve Buscemi
Steve Buscemi
Steve Buscemi
Steve Buscemi

Steve Buscemi, Jo Andres and Emmy Awards - Steve Buscemi and Jo Andres Saturday 12th April 2008 HBO's Annual Emmy Awards Post Awards Reception at the Pacific Design Center

Steve Buscemi, Jo Andres and Emmy Awards
Steve Buscemi, Jo Andres and Emmy Awards

Steve Buscemi, Jo Andres and Emmy Awards - Steve Buscemi, Jo Andres Monday 24th September 2012 64th Annual Primetime Emmy Awards, held at Nokia Theatre L.A. Live - Arrivals

Steve Buscemi, Jo Andres and Emmy Awards

New Love Interest For Steve Buscemi's In Boardwalk Empire Season 3


Steve Buscemi

Boardwalk Empire Season 3 kicked off over the weekend and with it came a change of fortunes for leading character Enoch 'Nucky' Thompson, played by Steve Buscemi. The first two seasons of the show have been somewhat of a hard luck story for Nucky in the story of love, according to CBS, but with the opening of the third it seems like that might be about to change as he falls for a Broadway chorine Billie Kent played by the actress Meg Chambers Steedle.

Nucky's previous marriage with Margaret Schroeder has gone south, as has his fling with Lucy Danziger, so it could be a case of third time lucky for the main protagonist. He's first seen still with Schroeder, hosting a New Year's Eve bash in 1922; however the stockbroker discards his wife and ends up in the bedroom with his new fling, looking for all the world like he might be in love.

"Billie is really a breath of fresh air for him," Terence Winter, the creator of Boardwalk Empire said. "She represents the whole idea of the youth culture that took over the 1920s - half-bohemian, half-adventurer, and out to have a good time."

"How the writers described Billie to me was, 'The second girl from the left,"' Steedle commented. "She's 'the girl onstage who's not the lead, but the one you can't take your eyes off.' She's fun. She loves the limelight. And she's not where she wants to be: She's moving from the left, trying to get to the center." It looks like she's going to be a prominent figure as the season develops.

Boardwalk Empire Season 3: Episode 1 Recap/Review


Steve Buscemi Gretchen Mol

The much anticipated return of Boardwalk Empire took place last night (Sept. 16) with the first episode of the third season, ‘Resolution’. With so many questions left from the dramatic finale of Season 2, how many answers were attempted in this aptly titled season premiere?

After a long, and frankly necessary recap of the events that predefine this episode, we’re treated to a classically brutal character introduction, with Gyp Rosetti suggesting he’ll be easily angered as the third season unfolds. His unceremonious pasting of a seemingly sweet old man not only sets the tone for his behaviour - raising the tension for every scene he’s present in - but also brings home the seriousness of the actions employed in last nights episode. Nucky (Steve Buscemi) means business, this much is exemplified with his own version of Gyp’s deceive then murder routine, and his frank appraisal of Margaret Schroeder’s recent behaviour. Expect sparks there. Manny Horvitz’s fledging working relationship with Nucky is over due to a shotgun to the face from Richard Harrow, who was avenging the death of his friend, and secret love, Angela Darmody. Harrow is angry, and was probably acting in the knowledge that Gillian (Gretchen Mol) now has an immovable stranglehold on the now-orphaned Tommy, who believes her to be his mother. Elsewhere, New Years Eve kicks off with a North African theme at the Thompson residence, but what party is complete without a shady meeting of gangsters in the cellar? This is where Nucky states his intentions to do business with Rothstein and Rothstein only, which of course angers Gyp – our temperamental Sicilian New-Yorker. Phew. Who else is flying off the handle? You guessed it: Al Capone. A few deaf jokes later and he’s in a flower shop ready to tear a rival gangster apart, and all before the New Years resolution deadline, which of course, was to be less violent. Anyway, ex-Agent Van Alden interrupts proceedings, saving Dean O'Banion's skin in the process: an act that he’ll be further rewarded for we’re sure. And that just about covers it. Just.

Resolution was a fantastic episode for the new season of Boardwalk Empire. The catastrophic events of last season took some tying up, and whilst they’re not all neatly dealt with yet, last night’s premiere set a fantastic tone for what is set to be a great season. What’s more, we didn’t get a single glimpse of Chalky White or Eli Thompson, and with those two characters enduring a difficult second season, especially with Nucky, it’ll be fascinating to see where they end up. Mooted by many as the hangover of series 2, ‘Resolution’ now sets our sights on the hangover from the biggest night of 1922.

On The Road Trailer


Sal Paradise is an ambitious young writer trying to find his place in the world. After his father passes away, he decides to seek out new experiences desperate to stay away from the mundaneness of everyday life. In New York, he meets ex-convict Dean Moriarty - an embodiment of the Beat Generation who fascinates him and ends up drawing him into his dangerous world of women, drugs and societal deviance. They hit the road alongside Dean's new, teenage wife Marylou doing anything and everything to ensure that new experiences never end and seek out their own freedom. Along the way they find who they really are, who their friends are and the meaning of being free.

Continue: On The Road Trailer

Steve Buscemi Wednesday 13th June 2012 on the set of 'Boardwalk Empire' in Brooklyn

Steve Buscemi
Steve Buscemi

Steve Buscemi and Macy's - Tina Fay, Steve Buscemi Thursday 10th May 2012 NYWIFT's 13th Annual Designing Women Awards held at Macy's - Arrivals

Steve Buscemi and Macy's
Steve Buscemi and Macy's
Tina Fey, Steve Buscemi and Macy's
Tina Fey, Steve Buscemi and Macy's

Steve Buscemi Wednesday 4th April 2012 The New York Premiere of HBO's new series, 'Girls', at the SVA Theater

Steve Buscemi

Steve Buscemi and Screen Actors Guild Sunday 29th January 2012 18th Annual Screen Actors Guild Awards (SAG Awards) held at The Shrine Auditorium - Press Room

Steve Buscemi and Screen Actors Guild
Steve Buscemi and Screen Actors Guild
Steve Buscemi and Screen Actors Guild
Steve Buscemi and Screen Actors Guild

Steve Buscemi, Golden Globe Awards and Beverly Hilton Hotel - Steve Buscemi and Jo Andres, Sunday 15th January 2012 The 69th Annual Golden Globe Awards (Golden Globes 2012) held at The Beverly Hilton Hotel - Arrivals

Steve Buscemi, Golden Globe Awards and Beverly Hilton Hotel
Steve Buscemi, Golden Globe Awards and Beverly Hilton Hotel

Steve Buscemi Friday 13th January 2012 on the film set of 'Burt Wonderstone' at Freemont Street in Las Vegas

Steve Buscemi
Atmosphere and Steve Buscemi
Steve Buscemi

Video - Steve Carell Looks Unrecognisable With Blond Hair


Actor Steve Carell (The Office; The 40 Year Old Virgin); Steve Buscemi (Monster's Inc; Reservoir Dogs) and Olivia Wilde (In Time; Cowboys & Aliens) film their new movie "Burt Wonderstone" on the Las Vegas Strip in Nevada. Steve is unrecognisable with blond hair as he stands elevated above crew members. Olivia Wilde is also seen with blonde hair; she wears a sparkly looking jacket. The actors look to be filming a tense scene, as they both look harassed.

Burt Wonderstone also stars Jim Carrey. This isn't the first time Jim and Steve have appeared on the big screen together - they were co-stars in the 2003 hit Bruce Almighty

Steve Buscemi - Steve Buscemi and Jo Andres New York City, USA - Lincoln Center presents: An Evening with Ralph Lauren hosted by Oprah Winfrey at Alice Tully Hall Monday 24th October 2011

Steve Buscemi
Steve Buscemi

Steve Buscemi - Steve Buscemi, New York City, USA - 2011 New York City Ballet Fall Gala at the David Koch Theatre at Lincoln Center - Outside Arrivals Thursday 22nd September 2011

Steve Buscemi, Martin Scorsese and Emmy Awards - Steve Buscemi and Martin Scorsese Los Angeles, California - The 63rd Primetime Emmy Awards held at the Nokia Theater - Arrivals Sunday 18th September 2011

Steve Buscemi, Martin Scorsese and Emmy Awards
Steve Buscemi, Martin Scorsese and Emmy Awards
Steve Buscemi and Emmy Awards

Steve Buscemi Wednesday 14th September 2011 Boardwalk Empire season 2 Premiere New York City, USA

Steve Buscemi
Steve Buscemi
Steve Buscemi
Steve Buscemi
Atmosphere and Steve Buscemi
Steve Buscemi

The Messenger Review


Excellent
Another dark, gloomy drama about home life during wartime, this film features some seriously great performances and a theme that will resonate powerfully with thoughtful audiences.

Will (Foster) is just out of military hospital after being injured while serving in Iraq; his relationship with his girlfriend (Malone) is strained, and he's not happy about his new assignment informing families about the deaths of loved ones in the warzone. His mentor for the job is the jaded Tony (Harrelson), who survives by maintaining his distance from the families: "Don't touch the NOK" (next of kin), he tells Will. But Will can't help but reach out to them, and one widow (Morton) makes a particularly strong impression on him.

Continue reading: The Messenger Review

Steve Buscemi - Steve Buscemi and his wife New York City, USA - The New York Premiere of 'Mildred Pierce' - Arrivals Monday 21st March 2011

Steve Buscemi
Steve Buscemi

Aleksa Palladino, Kelly MacDonald, Michael Pitt, Paz de la Huerta and Steve Buscemi - Aleksa Palladino, Michael Pitt, Kelly Macdonald, Steve Buscemi, Paz de la Huerta Sunday 30th January 2011 at Screen Actors Guild Los Angeles, California

Aleksa Palladino, Kelly Macdonald, Michael Pitt, Paz De La Huerta and Steve Buscemi
Paz De La Huerta, Aleksa Palladino and Kelly Macdonald
Paz De La Huerta, Aleksa Palladino, Ariel Winter and Kelly Macdonald
Paz De La Huerta, Aleksa Palladino, Ariel Winter and Kelly Macdonald
Paz De La Huerta, Aleksa Palladino, Ariel Winter and Kelly Macdonald
Aleksa Palladino and Michael Pitt

Steve Buscemi - Steve Buscemi and Jo Andres Saturday 29th January 2011 at Directors Guild Of America Hollywood, California

Steve Buscemi
Steve Buscemi
Steve Buscemi

Steve Buscemi - Steve Buscemi, wife Jo Andres Sunday 16th January 2011 at Golden Globe Awards Los Angeles, California

Steve Buscemi
Steve Buscemi
Steve Buscemi
Steve Buscemi

Steve Buscemi and HBO - Jo Andres and Steve Buscemi Sunday 16th January 2011 at Golden Globe Awards Beverly Hills, California

Steve Buscemi and Hbo
Steve Buscemi and Hbo
Steve Buscemi and Hbo
Steve Buscemi and Hbo

Kelly Mcdonald and Steve Buscemi - Kelly McDonald and Steve Buscemi Sunday 16th January 2011 at Golden Globe Awards Beverly Hills, California

Kelly Mcdonald and Steve Buscemi

Steve Buscemi Wednesday 17th November 2010 celebrities outside Chateau Marmont after attending a GQ party Los Angeles, USA

Steve Buscemi
Steve Buscemi

Grown Ups Review


Weak
Why is it that comedies about middle-aged men regressing to their childhood so rarely, if ever, work? Not much more than an in-joke between the actors, this film is amiable but never funny. And despite some hackneyed moralising, it has nothing to say.

Five school buddies return home 30 years later for their beloved coach's funeral. Lenny (Sandler) is now a high-powered Beverly Hills agent married to a hot fashionista (Hayek). Eric (James) is an average guy with a lively wife (Bello) and unruly kids. Kurt (Rock) is a frazzled househusband married to a high-powered shrew (Rudolph). Marcus (Spade) is still the same lothario. And Rob (Schneider) is an overly emotional goofball with a much-older wife (Van Patten). Altogether, they head to a lake house for a week of wacky antics and shallow soul-searching.

Continue reading: Grown Ups Review

Steve Buscemi Thursday 4th March 2010 Steve Buscemi attending the opening night of the Broadway play 'Lend Me A Tenor' at the Music Box Theatre. New York, USA

Steve Buscemi

Grown Ups Trailer


Watch the trailer for Grown Ups

Continue: Grown Ups Trailer

Youth In Revolt Trailer


Nick Twisp is an average 16 year old boy, obsessed with the opposite sex yet he never has any luck finding a girl of his own. Whilst on holiday with his unpredictable parents Nick finds a new girl who he feels is right for him, Sheeni. Now the only thing standing in his way is the undeniable fact that, nice guys never get the girl.... there's also a another small problem Sheeni already has a boyfriend. 

Continue: Youth In Revolt Trailer

Steve Buscemi and Jo Andres - Steve Buscemi, Jo Andres New York City, USA - The New York premiere of 'The Messenger' held at Clearview's Chelsea Cinema Sunday 8th November 2009

Steve Buscemi and Jo Andres
Steve Buscemi and Jo Andres
Steve Buscemi and Jo Andres

Steve Buscemi - Steve Buscemi with Jo Andres East Hampton, New York - The 17th Annual Hamptons International Film Festival - Chairman's Reception Saturday 10th October 2009

Steve Buscemi
Steve Buscemi
Steve Buscemi

Rage Trailer


Watch the trailer for Rage

Continue: Rage Trailer

G-Force Trailer


Watch the trailer for G-Force

Continue: G-Force Trailer

G-Force Review


Very Good
This rollicking action romp has all of the chase scenes and car crashes you expect from a Jerry Bruckheimer movie, but a lot more (intentional) laughs thanks to a witty script and a cast of engaging rodents.

Ben and Marcie (Galifianakis and Garner) are horrified when a new FBI manager (Arnett) decides to shut down their project: training rodents and insects to be super spies. But these tiny agents refuse to go quietly, especially as they've just launched a mission to stop a kitchen appliance maker (Nighy) from taking over the world. After being shipped off to a pet store, three guinea pigs Darwin, Juarez and Blaster (voiced by Rockwell, Cruz and Morgan) and their tech-expert mole Speckles (Cage) plot their escape with pet guinea pig Hurley (Favreau).

Continue reading: G-Force Review

Steve Buscemi Monday 4th May 2009 Soho Rep Spring Gala 2009 at The Park - Arrivals New York City, USA

Steve Buscemi
Steve Buscemi
Steve Buscemi

Igor Review


Good
Igor is the Rodney Dangerfield of cinematic sidekicks. With rare exceptions (Marty Feldman's turn in Young Frankenstein), the deformed lab assistant gets little horror movie respect. Even the legendary Bela Lugosi balked at the suggestion that he play one alongside a then relatively unknown Boris Karloff. It's always about the monster or the mad scientist, not the hunchbacked scrub doing all the dirty work. In the imaginative new animated feature Igor, director Anthony Leondis and writer Chris McKenna try to change our perception of the often marginalized character. While there's imagination to spare, the storyline is often bogged down by obvious animation conventions.

In the country of Malaria, young Igor (John Cusack) longs to be a mad scientist. Every year, the grim, gloomy nation holds a competition to see who can invent the most horrific item. The winning design is then used by King Malbert (Jay Leno) to blackmail the rest of the world into filling the kingdom's coffers. Typically, Dr. Schadenfreude (Eddie Izzard) steals the best idea -- with the help of his girlfriend Jacyln (Jennifer Coolidge) -- and takes all the glory. But this time, things are a little unusual. The best invention turns out to be Igor's: a gargantuan fiend named Eva (Molly Shannon) who fancies herself an actress. With the help of his self-made companions Brain (Sean Hayes) and Scamper (Steve Buscemi), our hero must convince the creature that she's truly evil, or lose a chance at his dream once and for all.

Continue reading: Igor Review

Delirious Review


Very Good
I have seen Steve Buscemi in person, and he is not particularly ratlike -- he's actually a bit dapper, almost handsome. But on screen, Buscemi persists in embodying the most rodentlike of characters -- twitchy, scraggly, often lurking in the shadows. His voicing of Templeton the (actual) rat in the live-action Charlotte's Web seemed less perfect casting than foregone conclusion.

Buscemi's character in Tom DiCillo's Delirious is Les Galantine, a "licensed professional" photographer who is undistinguished even by paparazzi standards and ratlike even by Buscemi standards. An irritable loner, Les roams alleys and back entrances with a pack of similar-minded (but slightly less desperate) shutterbugs, grasping for shots of stars like pop sensation D'Harma (Alison Lohman). It's at one of these melees that he bumps into the genially homeless Toby (Michael Pitt); soon Toby has a reluctant, unstable ally and a place to stay. Les, in turn, has someone to listen to his rants and delusions, and to accompany him on sad visits to his elderly parents -- unimpressed, of course, with his published pictures.

Continue reading: Delirious Review

Joe Strummer: The Future Is Unwritten Review


Excellent
The flames from the bonfires around which the participants in Julien Temple's loving filmic portrait Joe Strummer: The Future is Unwritten helps bring something more to their faces and words than the cold glare of a documentarian's prying camera. Warmth, heat, honesty... whatever it is, that factor is a large part of what makes this documentary such a rollicking, damn near inspirational film, since these people for the most part don't appear to be simply spitting words at an interviewer in the standard manner of a documentary, but rather conversing. They're not being interviewed, it seems, but just talking, telling stories around a fire to whomever happens to be listening (as one does), helping the crackling flames keep back the circle of night by remembering one of the century's most astounding and inexplicable talents.

A child of British diplomats who was always keenly embarrassed of his public school education and refers to himself as "a mouthy little git," Strummer was squatting in London with gypsies in the mid-1970s, busking for food money, playing in a pub band called the 101ers, and generally charming the pants off of everyone he met. It was a hand-to-mouth existence, but seemed like the kind of thing Strummer could do for years, living his beloved lowlife. Then he was being introduced to a trio of short-haired punks, The Clash was formed, and Strummer was on his way to rock stardom. He wasn't a singer, he was a yelper (as some fantastic footage of him laying down the vocal track for "White Riot" shows particularly well), a snaggletoothed smoker with a penchant for nonsensical lyrics and overblown statements. But in Strummer's work, with The Clash and afterwards, there always rang true a tone of absolute and unmistakable sincerity, sung and played with complete conviction each and every time. This was a man without irony, leading a band that set the model for all the conscious groups which would follow (tellingly, Bono is one of the interviewees here, talking about The Clash being his first concert, and in short the reason he got into music).

Continue reading: Joe Strummer: The Future Is Unwritten Review

Romance & Cigarettes Review


Weak
John Turturro's dream project Romance & Cigarettes is a gutter-style jukebox musical with chutzpah to spare and which doesn't know when to quit. It's all here: Singing garbagemen! Catfight in a SoHo lingerie store! Hot-to-trot Kate Winslet as a scorchingly foul-mouthed Irish hussy. Toe-tapping Christopher Walken in full strutting peacock mode, driving an old Detroit beater with a license plate reading "BoDiddley." A wife screaming at her husband, recently discovered cheating, "I trim your nose hair!" Family, infidelity, and a basketful of pop tunes for everyone to sing along to -- Ute Lemper to Connie Francis to Bruce Springsteen to James Brown to Tom Jones to....

Somewhere in all Turturro's chaos is a story about Nick Murder (James Gandolfini), a blue-collar schlub with a stolid wife, Kitty (Susan Sarandon), and a trio of slightly cracked daughters -- Constance, Baby, and Rosebud (Mary-Louise Parker, Aida Turturro, and Mandy Moore, respectively) -- who function partially as a junior set of Furies but are mostly there to bash out songs in the backyard as part of the three-piece bubblegum garage band they've formed. In short: Nick's a two-timing bastard who's stepping out on the wife with Tula (the previously mentioned Irish hussy), a fact Kitty doesn't take to overly well, and numerous friends and family get dragged into their scuffle and forcing everyone to occasionally bust out in song.

Continue reading: Romance & Cigarettes Review

Interview Review


Excellent
On November 2, 2004, Dutch filmmaker Theo van Gogh was murdered on a bustling street in Amsterdam as he rode his bike to work. Van Gogh's murderer, a radical Islamist, shot him eight times, slashed open his throat, and left a five-page letter pinned to his chest with a knife. The attack was a savage response to van Gogh's 2004 short film, Submission, a ten-minute lamentation on the problem of violence toward women in certain Islamic societies. Thus was born the legend of Theo van Gogh -- suffering artist, free-speech martyr, persecuted prophet.

Before his death, van Gogh resolved to remake three of his previous films, this time in English and set in New York City. Now, with the help of three notable actor-directors -- Steve Buscemi, Stanley Tucci, and John Turturro -- van Gogh's vision is being realized in the form of the Triple Theo Project. Interview, Buscemi's contribution, is the first film in the series.

Continue reading: Interview Review

Paris, Je T'aime Review


Good
One would like to think that there at least a few other cities in the world besides Paris that could have inspired a film as varied in the types of cinematic pleasure so ably delivered by the anthology piece Paris Je T'Aime -- but it seems unlikely. This isn't due to an unavailability of good stories or locations in many other great metropolises, but more because being able to dangle the possibility of shooting in Paris in front of the world's greatest directors is going to be so much more enticing. Also, there are few other cities besides Paris that come with such a powerful and multifarious wealth of preassociated images and emotions for both filmmaker and audience to both draw upon and react against. So what could have been a collection of short films with a few highs, several lows, and a lot of muddled in-betweens is in fact a remarkably and consistently imaginative body of work, practically giddy with energy, that only rarely touches the ground.

Project overseers Emmanuel Benbihy and Tristan Carné wanted to create a cinematic map of Paris, with each short film representing one of the city's 20 arrondissements (neighborhoods). They ended up with 18 films, none of them more than a few minutes long and directed by a glittering, international roster of filmmakers. While none of the films here are anything approaching masterpieces, hardly a one is in any way a chore to sit through, which has to be some sort of an accomplishment.

Continue reading: Paris, Je T'aime Review

I Think I Love My Wife Review


Terrible
Let's admit up front that Chris Rock can be very funny.

The guy is vicious onstage, marching back and forth as he stares down his crowd. Rock usually grips the microphone like he's afraid someone's going to take it away before he's finished spitting hard truths about relationships, money, and celebrities. Even his television work is solid, from a memorable run on Saturday Night Live to the ongoing sitcom Everybody Hates Chris, which brings nostalgic sentiment to a textbook underdog story.

Continue reading: I Think I Love My Wife Review

Reservoir Dogs Review


Extraordinary
Now here's a stellar directorial debut from some guy named Quentin Tarantino.

Before he became a household name, Tarantino stunned us all with this low-budget tale analyzing the before-and-after (and remarkably very little of the "during") of a diamond heist. Set largely within the confines of one warehouse, the movie is so chock full of witty and quotable dialogue ("Mr. Brown? That sounds too much like Mr. Shit. ") and eye-popping scenes (when, say, the suspected cop is doused in gasoline and has his ear cut off) that it has become an instant classic. Not incidentally, it also remade both the heist movie and the gangster flick, spawning countless imitations, just like later Tarantino works would do.

Continue reading: Reservoir Dogs Review

Mr. Deeds Review


Weak
Adam Sandler really wants you to like him. Oh, and he's also very sorry for Little Nicky, an experiment that resembled your typical Sandler flick but had the drawing power of my socks after a full-court basketball game. This time out, Sandler plays it extremely safe in an effort to please his slighted fan base and cover his once-dominated bases. Too bad repeated trips under the microscope of comedy ultimately have produced a lukewarm version of material the comedian relied upon years ago.

Sandler fills the title role in Mr. Deeds (a remake of the ancient Gary Cooper film), playing an unassuming New Hampshire resident and aspiring greeting card writer who learns he's the heir to a $40 billion media conglomerate. Since happiness isn't tied to financial gains in the Granite state, the newfound fortune doesn't faze Deeds, though he does agree to accompany two shareholders (Peter Gallagher and Erick Avari) back to Manhattan to sign what he's told is required paperwork. Once in N.Y., the "big city vs. big country" gags march down Park Avenue with mixed results.

Continue reading: Mr. Deeds Review

Lonesome Jim Review


Very Good
If you were to saddle Garden State with a far less likeable lead and set it in Indiana, you might end up with this small gem, the latest from actor-cum-director Steve Buscemi. The Lonesome Jim in question (Casey Affleck) returns home ostensibly to find himself, but really he's just there to mooch off his folks until he can plan his next move. The fact that he finds himself in spite of himself saves this film from being a mere installment of "Profiles in Schmuck-itude," even if it ups the cheese factor as a result.

The movie begins with Jim's surprise arrival at his parents' house. His brother, Tim (Kevin Corrigan), still lives there but is less than pleased to see him. His mother, Sally (Mary Kay Place), is overjoyed but clueless as to Jim's unhappiness, even as he breaks down within minutes of walking through the door. And his father, Don (Seymour Cassel), in response to Jim's claim that his breakdown is due to "dehydration," simply suggests a cup of water.

Continue reading: Lonesome Jim Review

Charlotte's Web (2006) Review


Good
That's sooooooooooooooooome Dakota Fanning!

It's only a mild heresy to turn a beloved children's book and animated film into a star vehicle for the wee Miss Fanning, the go-to child actress who has become Hollywood's only A-list star under the age of 13. The only real surprise is that she doesn't have her own production company yet.

Continue reading: Charlotte's Web (2006) Review

Art School Confidential Review


Excellent
Few things are more mystifying to outsiders than the world of modern art. Which of course makes it the perfect backdrop for a Terry Zwigoff film. Where else is eccentricity, flamboyance, and pretension considered normal? And who's more alienated and misunderstood than an art student rejected by his art school classmates, who are, quite naturally, alienated and misunderstood themselves? Art School Confidential, Zwigoff's latest, mines this territory for humor and poignancy, raising questions about the nature of art and alienation.As in Zwigoff's previous films, which include Crumb, Ghost World, and Bad Santa, Art School's hero is far from heroic. Played by Max Minghella, with his dark eyes and brooding bushy brows, Jerome Platz is a young art student whose primary aspiration is to be the greatest artist of the 21st century, the next Picasso. His secondary concern -- to find an emotional, intellectual, erotic connection with a woman -- proves even more ambitious since he feels only one girl, luminous art model Audrey (Sophia Myles), is worthy of his attention.The trouble is, after an initial connection with Jerome, Audrey shifts her attention to another freshman painter, the hunky Jonah, whose simple, innocent paintings have turned him into something of a campus hero. In order to win Audrey back, Jerome asks for the help of Jimmy (Jim Broadbent), a bitter, reclusive, alcoholic painter. Broadbent's performance is the film's strongest, which is saying something in a film packed with celebrated actors. His Jimmy is sensitive and fearsome, wise, and terrible -- all at once. At several points in the film, during fits of artistic pique, Jimmy's eyes flash with anger and fix on Jerome -- and the misery of a rotten, wasted life paralyzes both Jerome and the audience. The jolting power of these moments, of Broadbent's poisonous eyes, makes his turn a thing to behold.Jerome's classmates and instructors at the Strathmore Institute figure prominently in the film's wry exploration of what makes good art good, and what makes the truest art timeless. Professor Sandiford (John Malkovich) is a failed painter who is unable to see Jerome's talent and potential but wouldn't mind sleeping with him. Jerome's roommate Vince (Ethan Suplee, of TV's My Name Is Earl) is a fast-talking, sexually obsessed film student. And Jerome's friend Bardo is a talentless, wayward womanizer who doesn't belong in art school. Several heavyweight actors play the bit parts that round out the cast, including Angelica Huston as a sage art history professor, Steve Buscemi as a freewheeling gallery owner, and Michael Lerner as a greedy art dealer.Art School marks Zwigoff's second collaboration with Daniel Clowes, who wrote both the screenplay and the graphic novel on which it was based. Their first collaboration, the 2001 film Ghost World, earned them an avalanche of critical praise and an Academy Award nomination for Best Adapted Screenplay. However, Art School isn't as good as Ghost World, despite their abundant similarities. The connection between the central characters in Ghost World, Thora Birch's Enid and Buscemi's Seymour, was fascinating, odd, and easily understood. Jerome and Audrey's relationship, meanwhile, never takes shape, partly because Audrey's character is completely lifeless. Zwigoff and Clowes never get around to showing us who she is or what she wants. It's never clear why she would turn her back on Jerome to pursue Jonah when she knows better than anyone that Jerome is the real talent.Such problems keep Art School from the heights of achievement of Ghost World and Crumb, but don't keep it from being a provocative, entertaining movie. Art School will go down as a minor work from the maker of off-kilter gems.Between you and me...

Kiss Daddy Goodnight Review


Weak
This low-rent thriller is Uma Thurman's first performance (in fact, it's said it was her first audition, even). Grainy and cheap, the 1988 film has Thurman as a party girl who makes her living by letting people pick her up at clubs, then drugging them when they're back at his place. She ammasses cash and countless treasures this way, until eventually a murder changes the score.

Continue reading: Kiss Daddy Goodnight Review

Animal Factory Review


Very Good
Dear Ma,

After seeing Steve Buscemi's sophomore directorial effort, Animal Factory (following 1996's Trees Lounge), I nearly reconsidered choosing film criticism as a career path. For the first hour of this film, it seemed the way to go was to become a convict. (By the way, ma, they don't call 'em inmates in the pen, they call 'em convicts.)

Continue reading: Animal Factory Review

The Big Lebowski Review


Very Good
It bears repeating: Just because you happen to make an amazing, perfectly-crafted, wildly funny movie (Fargo), doesn't mean you can do whatever the hell you want in your follow-up and pass it off as art.

The Big Lebowski is the definitive answer to skeptics like me who wondered if Fargo was the fluke, and sort-of-okay flicks like The Hudsucker Proxy were more the norm for the Coen brothers. They undoubtedly are. In The Big Lebowski, the Coens had the world to play with as a palette. What they delivered is a wreck.

Continue reading: The Big Lebowski Review

The Grey Zone Review


Essential
One of the most poignant moments in the grave Holocaust drama The Grey Zone comes as a group of Hungarian Jews known as the Sonderkommando try to save the life of a young girl who has come out of the death chamber alive. These Sonderkommando assisted the Nazis in the killing of fellow Jews in exchange for a four-month reprieve from their own death sentence. They received better food and more comfortable living quarters, but they knew all along that their time would eventually reach a similar, tragic end. "It makes no difference, we're dead anyway," one of the men coils. But for this one fleeting moment, their thoughts of death elude them as they rescue this seemingly inconsequential girl.

Many scenes, like the above, though thoroughly bleak and depressing, exemplify why The Grey Zone is such a beautiful film. Based on true events as told in the book Auschwitz: a Doctor's Eyewitness Account, the film chronicles the struggles faced by these Sonderkommando as they plan and eventually execute a fatal uprising that destroys two crematoriums inside the Auschwitz II-Birkenau death camp.

Continue reading: The Grey Zone Review

Rising Sun Review


OK
Wildly improbable (read: typical Crichton) tale about a murder in a Japanese office building. It's action heroes Connery and Snipes on the case, so look out! Plenty of Japanese subculture to be examined and often mocked, which led to charges of racism against the book and the movie.

Home On The Range Review


Very Good
Disney's recent, highly-publicized split with Pixar Animation Studios probably caused stockholders, executives, and outsiders eyeballing the Mouse House to quake in their boots. After all, Walt's prized studio hasn't produced a worthy animated feature-length film in years - progress peaked with 1999's Tarzan and has steadily declined from Atlantis and Lilo & Stitch to last year's bland Brother Bear.

The toppling trend bucks slightly this week with the release of the unexpectedly pleasant Home on the Range, a smart and lively adventure set on the fringes of America's frontier that temporarily places Disney's 2-D animation station back in the saddle.

Continue reading: Home On The Range Review

Mystery Train Review


OK
Another oddity odyssey courtesy of Jim Jarmusch, Mystery Train is actually his first color film and hardly his best work. Following a triptych of stories in a sleepy, run-down Memphis hotel (the train itself is considerably less important to the story), while the movie has a number of gigglish moments, on the whole it's a disappointment of squandered story ideas that plod on without much happening. Pretty typical of Jarmusch's characters' on-screen chattiness.

Fargo Review


Essential
The Coen brothers are back and in a big way. Bigger, as a matter of fact, than ever before, because with Fargo, the Coens have produced a masterpiece of a film that outclasses anything they've done yet--from Raising Arizona to Barton Fink to even Blood Simple, the movie that put them on the map. Fargo is perhaps the best movie to come down the pike since Pulp Fiction--so good that it earns my seldom-awarded five-star rating.

Fargo is one of those rare pictures about which I have nothing negative to say. Based on an allegedly true story (since debunked as fiction) that took place in North Dakota/Minnesota in 1987, Fargo is the instantly enthralling tale of the financially-troubled Jerry Lundergaard (William H. Macy), a plan to kidnap his wife (Kristin Rudrud), her wealthy father (Harve Presnell), the halfway-competent criminals who screw everything up (Steve Buscemi and Peter Stormare), and the pregnant cop who's on the case (Frances McDormand).

Continue reading: Fargo Review

The Wedding Singer Review


Excellent
Nine years out of the '80s and we already have our first nostalgic look back in Adam Sandler's The Wedding Singer, an entertaining romantic comedy which recalls the days of big hair, Thriller, and Miami Vice with a sense of fondness.

Essentially, The Wedding Singer follows Adam Sandler as Robbie Hart, the titular character, who is fixated upon the idea of participating in his own wedding. Devastatingly, though, when the big day comes, his bride to be is a no-show. She has realized that she could not spend the rest of her life with a lowly wedding singer. Consequently, the break-up has traumatized Robbie so much that he must avoid the painful experience of weddings altogether. Thus, his new line as a Bar mitzvah singer. Shortly thereafter, Drew Barrymore as Julia begins to open his eyes to love again, at which point Robbie must contend with her creep fiancee Glen for her affections.

Continue reading: The Wedding Singer Review

Double Whammy Review


Weak
Has any film director fallen quite as far as Tom DiCillo? After a masterful debut with his tongue-in-cheek look at filmmaking, Living in Oblivion, DiCillo has turned in a series of progressively more-ignored features, including Box of Moon Light and The Real Blonde. His latest, Double Whammy, is going straight to video, despite a cast that includes Denis Leary and Elizabeth Hurley -- and not in bit parts, either!

The silly, one-joke story is reason enough to find Whammy (not a movie about Press Your Luck!) so inspiring. Leary plays a cop who, only through some fault of his own, is never able to bust a perp. It starts out in a fast food joint, when a gunman drives through the wall and starts shooting. Leary slips and hits his head, and a little bespectacled kid uses his gun to save the day. Later, his apartment supervisor is killed while he's oblivious in the building. Various quirky characters (like Hurley's masseuse) try to distract you into thinking this movie is actually about something, but the deception never works too well.

Continue reading: Double Whammy Review

Kansas City Review


Weak
Every time Robert Altman makes a movie, it becomes the thing to do for the Hollywood acting community. It happened with The Player. It happened with Short Cuts. It happened with Ready to Wear. And it happened with Kansas City.

The only problem is that The Player was the last of his films that was really all that great. While Kansas City marks a slight improvement over Ready to Wear, that ain't saying much because, after all, so does Showgirls.

Continue reading: Kansas City Review

Love In The Time Of Money Review


Weak
Filmmaker's dilemma: You want to make a movie with a lot of sex scenes and no plot whatsoever, but you have to make something respectable. Hell, Robert Redford is an executive producer! He isn't going to tolerate any Cinemax soft-core porn.

Answer: String together a bunch of unrelated vignettes revolving around sex. Start with a hooker and her client, then send that client to work to have sex with someone there, then send that woman's husband to an art gallery to have sex with an artist, and send him on his way as well.

Continue reading: Love In The Time Of Money Review

The Impostors Review


Very Good
A charming and funny farce, obviously the brainchild of Tucci on peyote (or something akin), The Impostors lacks the magic of a film like Big Night, but still makes you smile plenty. A host of indie regulars round out the cast, which features Platt and Tucci as hapless actors stranded on a cruise liner.

28 Days Review


Weak
Everyone knows that writers are drunks. I mean, I'm drunk right now. I'm surprised I can type, you know, since my hands are shaking so bad and my vision is so blurry.

If you're ready to buy in to the writer-as-alcoholic cliché, you should just love 28 Days, which pulls out every stereotype in the book. Sandra Bullock stars as Gwen, the aforementioned drunk writer (living, naturally, in New York City), who ruins her sister's wedding by insulting her during the toast, falling on the cake, and wrecking the "just married" car by crashing it into a house! Off to rehab for her, where she meets a cast of characters drawn so broadly they could populate a sitcom on UPN.

Continue reading: 28 Days Review

Spy Kids 3-D: Game Over Review


Very Good
Companies have created a number of brain-numbing devices to milk the susceptible wallets of adolescents in recent years. From Playstation to GameCube to Xbox, it seems as if the companies are always releasing new video game systems, only pausing to develop new and improved systems. It's a wonder they haven't come up with a device that allows the gamers to enter the video game itself.

Now they have -- except the gamers will have to drop their controllers for a few hours to catch Spy Kids 3-D in order to experience it. This is the movie video gamers have been waiting for, designed specifically for short-attention spans -- it's loaded with stimulating effects, nonstop action sequences, and, best yet, a journey inside a very cool video game in 3-D! It goes without saying that Spy Kids 3-D might be the only movie this summer with enough charisma to get your kids to leave their consoles -- so take advantage of it.

Continue reading: Spy Kids 3-D: Game Over Review

Ghost World Review


Excellent
It's been seven years since director Terry Zwigoff impressed moviegoers with his documentary Crumb, an uncomfortable look at pop comic artist R. Crumb and his disturbing, grotesque, dysfunctional family. Zwigoff's ability to make viewers squirm and laugh at the same time is again in full bloom, with the fictional Ghost World, a funny, sympathetic look at a whole new group of awkward, unhappy people.

Based on a comic/graphic novel by Daniel Clowes (who co-wrote the screenplay adaptation with Zwigoff), Ghost World provides the point-of-view of young Enid, just out of high school, and aimless in both direction and identity. In the able hands of Thora Birch, who's already suffered the ennui of suburbia in American Beauty, Enid is a caustic, sarcastic, yet charming, sweetie. Birch is in practically every scene of the film, and anchors it with perfect tone.

Continue reading: Ghost World Review

Lonesome Jim Review


Very Good
If you were to saddle Garden State with a far less likeable lead and set it in Indiana, you might end up with this small gem, the latest from actor-cum-director Steve Buscemi. The Lonesome Jim in question (Casey Affleck) returns home ostensibly to find himself, but really he's just there to mooch off his folks until he can plan his next move. The fact that he finds himself in spite of himself saves this film from being a mere installment of "Profiles in Schmuck-itude," even if it ups the cheese factor as a result.

The movie begins with Jim's surprise arrival at his parents' house. His brother, Tim (Kevin Corrigan), still lives there but is less than pleased to see him. His mother, Sally (Mary Kay Place), is overjoyed but clueless as to Jim's unhappiness, even as he breaks down within minutes of walking through the door. And his father, Don (Seymour Cassel), in response to Jim's claim that his breakdown is due to "dehydration," simply suggests a cup of water.

Continue reading: Lonesome Jim Review

The Last Outlaw Review


Bad
Whoa, Steve Buscemi in a western? With Mickey Rourke, too!? Sadly, crazy casting is just about the only thing of note in The Last Outlaw, a sad, sad excuse for a western. After a botched bank robbery, the film quickly degenerates into one long bloodbath, with the bad guys being killed by each other and/or the law. In the end, only one will survive? Which one? Who cares.

Monsters, Inc. Review


Excellent
The Pixar boys are at again with Monsters, Inc. taking their computer-animation talents from toys and insects to the magical world of monsters.

Magical indeed -- the way it works is that all those monsters that hide in the closet and scare little kids only do so because they have to -- they use the screams as energy to power Monstropolis, which exists just on the other side of every kid's bedroom closet door in the world.

Continue reading: Monsters, Inc. Review

The Grey Zone Review


Good

A harrowing, soul-searching account of the Holocaust is presented from a very unique perspective in "The Grey Zone," which is based in part on diaries found buried at Auschwitz and the memoirs of Miklos Nyiszli, a Jew who served as the camp's doctor and aided the abominable Josef Mengele in his experiments on prisoners.

The story tells of a 1944 revolt by the "Sonderkommando," a squad of Jewish internees who chose to serve as wardens of the concentration camp's gas chambers and crematoriums in exchange for a few more months of comparatively privileged life. In exchange for their detestable duties, they got larger quarters, fresh bed linens, good food, cigarettes, and the right to loot the belongings of new arrivals.

The selfishness and cowardice of this choice tortures most of the characters in this film, none more so than Hoffman (David Arquette in a rare dramatic and anguished performance), whom we see early on herding naked throngs into the "showers," promising "The sooner you shower, the sooner you'll be reunited with your families." As the doors are closed, the camera slowly creeps in on Arquette, hearing the gas pipes rattle to life and the screams that come moments later.

Continue reading: The Grey Zone Review

Spy Kids 3d: Game Over Review


Weak

Since the vast majority of the audience for "Spy Kid 3D: Game Over" has probably never seen a 3D movie with cheap, old-fashioned blue-and-red-lensed cardboard glasses, here's a three-point primer for proper enjoyment of any flick in this format:

1) Sit toward the middle of the theater. Because of the twin-image nature of 3D projection, the more off-center you are from the screen, the more you'll see eye-straining "ghosting" of images through your glasses instead of proper depth of field.

2) The left lens (red) always seems uncomfortably darker than the right (blue). Get used to it.

Continue reading: Spy Kids 3d: Game Over Review

Final Fantasy Review


OK

Fifty percent groundbreaking, breathtaking computer-generated visuals, 30 percent New Age spiritual hokum, 15 percent generic post-apocalyptic science fiction and five percent lame action flick clichés, "Final Fantasy: The Spirits Within" is such a eccentric amalgam of methods and moods that it's unlikely to leave anyone terribly impressed in the end. But absolutely everyone will be agog at the first 10 minutes.

Far and away the most mind-blowingly photo-realistic computer-animated movie to date, "Final Fantasy" wastes no time showing off what its huge staff of renderers can do, opening the picture with a fantastical dream sequence that includes a truly transporting alien landscape unequaled in the history of sci-fi cinema.

Its billowy red sky, gigantic looming moon, crystalline rock formations and sweeping vistas feel as real as another world could on screen. This was most definitely not shot through fancy filters in a quarry somewhere.

Continue reading: Final Fantasy Review

28 Days Review


Good

Director Betty Thomas' name in the opening credits of "28 Days" came as a big relief leading in to what looked like a soft-pedaled, politically corrected comedy about a happy-go-unlucky drunk -- played by button-cute Sandra Bullock -- wise-cracking her way through rehab.

It was reassuring to see that the woman holding the reins was a filmmaker who certainly knows how to turn a sow's ear into a silk purse. I mean, if she could make Howard Stern not only presentable but borderline sentimental (and without a hint of saccharine whitewash) in "Private Parts," surely a touchy subject like alcoholism is safe in her hands.

And so it is. Striking a sure-footed balance between its addiction woe and impudent humor, Thomas isn't afraid to scoff at twelve-steppers and include jests of questionable taste while still pulling off a story of a woman's difficult personal journey toward sobriety.

Continue reading: 28 Days Review

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The Death of Stalin Movie Review

The Death of Stalin Movie Review

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The Death Of Stalin Trailer

The Death Of Stalin Trailer

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The Boss Baby Movie Review

The Boss Baby Movie Review

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Norman: The Moderate Rise and Tragic Fall of a New York Fixer - Trailer and Clip Trailer

Norman: The Moderate Rise and Tragic Fall of a New York Fixer - Trailer and Clip Trailer

Norman Oppenheimer is a New York based hustler determined to climb the social ladder and...

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The Boss Baby Trailer

What happens when a baby takes the top position? Seven-year-old Tim Templeton was doing just...

Time Out Of Mind Trailer

Time Out Of Mind Trailer

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Hotel Transylvania 2 Trailer

Hotel Transylvania 2 Trailer

Count Dracula seems to have really changed his ways, embracing humans and allowing them to...

Hotel Transylvania 2 - Teaser Trailer

Hotel Transylvania 2 - Teaser Trailer

Following on from the adventures in the Hotel Transylvania, in which Count Dracula (Adam Sandler)...

The Cobbler Trailer

The Cobbler Trailer

Some people are far more important than you might think. For one lowly cobbler, things...

Khumba Movie Review

Khumba Movie Review

When this South African animated adventure embraces its unique setting and characters, it's visually stunning...

Khumba Trailer

Khumba Trailer

Khumba is a young zebra who was born missing half of his stripes. Following his...

Grown Ups 2 Movie Review

Grown Ups 2 Movie Review

There was nothing remotely notable about 2010's Grown Ups, and now we have a sequel...

Monsters University Movie Review

Monsters University Movie Review

Pixar revisits the characters from 2001's Monsters, Inc. for a frat-house prequel. Which is kind...

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