Steve Bing

Steve Bing

Steve Bing Quick Links

News Pictures Film Comments RSS

attend The Kills concert at the Mayan Theater

Steve Bing - Tasya van Ree and Steve Bing Monday 13th August 2012 attend The Kills concert at the Mayan Theater

Steve Bing

Marley Review


Excellent
This comprehensive documentary about iconic reggae artist Bob Marley traces his life with a first-hand attention to detail. Through interviews with family, friends and colleagues, it provides an entertaining, telling look at both the man and his beliefs.

As a teen Bob moved from the countryside to the slums of Trenchtown, outside Kingston, where he was confronted by his mixed-race roots (his father was a British Marine). In the 1960s, his ska band The Wailers found success in Jamaica. Then in 1972, Island Records founder Blackwell started promoting The Wailers as a rebellious rock act, leading to global celebrity. Over the next decade, Marley's life included world tours, a re-formed band line-up and a series of huge hits. In 1981, he died after a brief battle with long-existing cancer.

Continue reading: Marley Review

out and about in Beverly Hills

Steve Bing Thursday 15th September 2011 out and about in Beverly Hills Los Angeles, California

Steve Bing
Steve Bing

Steve Bing has dinner with a female friend at Nobu Malibu

Steve Bing Saturday 15th August 2009 Steve Bing has dinner with a female friend at Nobu Malibu California, USA

Steve Bing
Steve Bing
Steve Bing
Steve Bing

Shine a Light Review


Grim
Gimme Shelter this is not. The disillusions and stabbings of the 1969 concert have been replaced by the Clinton Foundation's benefit for the Natural Resource Defense Council and snapping camera phones. But Shine a Light is helmed by Martin Scorsese -- the man behind Goodfellas and Raging Bull -- shouldn't it push the boundaries set by Charlotte Zwerin and the Maysles brothers nearly 40 years ago? It should, but Scorsese has always had a cinematic hard-on for the Rolling Stones, and the result is a personal, biased love letter to the Stones signed with love by Marty.

When the Stones take the stage at New York City's Beacon Theater, it's frightening -- their age truly shows on film. As giants on the silver screen, we have a front row seat for an exhibition of frail bodies moving in ways that only young men should move. As Mick Jagger belts out songs of youthful rebellion and sexual frustration, he still does the same androgynous dances of yesteryear. Yet, this off-putting display of aged youth is clearly a place of sentiment for Scorsese, whose camera lingers with love.

Continue reading: Shine a Light Review

Beowulf Review


Weak
From the advent of sound with 1927's The Jazz Singer to the computer-generated effects breakthrough of 1989's The Abyss -- advancements in technology have had a major impact on cinematic storytelling, for better and worse. New technologies open up more cinematic experiences and new avenues for directors and actors to explore their craft. But it's easy to get caught up in the razzmatazz of the latest spectacle, instead of focusing on age-old, tried and true thematic substance. And that's exactly Beowulf's tragic flaw.

The Beowulf legend originates from a 700 A.D. oral tradition that was adapted in epic poem form by the English and into film form by director Robert Zemeckis -- using motion-captured live-action performances that are turned into a computer-generated light show. Much like the IMAX 3D screenings of Zemeckis' previous effort, The Polar Express, Beowulf's tale of a hero who comes to rid a Scandinavian village of its monster, while screaming his name every chance he gets, is more a showcase for RealD technology than an engaging film.

Continue reading: Beowulf Review

Kangaroo Jack Review


Grim
An Australian tall tale dating back to 1903 (according to the Internet, and the Internet would never lie) relates the escapades of the "Gucci Kangaroo" a mischievous marsupial that robs foreigners of hats, sunglasses, or jackets. The story tells of hapless travelers, inexperienced in the wild ways of the outback, unwittingly running down a kangaroo while driving in the land Down Under. Believing that the carcass of a dead animal is the perfect addition to any travel photo, these tourists dress up the pouchy beast with an assortment of gear. But the animal has only been stunned and, bursting to life, it makes off with the items.

Somehow inspired by this bit of Australian folklore, Jerry Bruckheimer and a posse of conspirators (notably director David McNally, famous for the boobs and booze epic Coyote Ugly) decided to turn this story into a by-the-book chase movie. While Kangaroo Jack does deliver the fart jokes, bumps on the head, and anthropomorphized CGI animals necessary to keep kids interested, it never really delivers quality laughs or whimsy. It borrows watered-down versions of car chases, airplane chases, jeep chases, and gunplay from other Bruckheimer fare such as Con Air and Gone in 60 Seconds, that seem more played out than exciting.

Continue reading: Kangaroo Jack Review

Night at the Golden Eagle Review


Good
Old town Los Angeles, just south of the high-rise financial district, is a seedy, run-down visage of what once was a thriving metropolis. Filled with drugs, prostitution, and vagrants, it represents a dark underbelly of the glamour of Hollywood. In the heart of all this mess is the Golden Eagle hotel, setting for Night at the Golden Eagle, by director Adam Rifkin.

The film presents a snapshot of the hotel and its inhabitants, looking into a night filled with murder and gluttony in the doldrums of a desolate world. Tommy (Donnie Montemarano) and Mick (Vinnie Argiro) are two life-long friends from Brooklyn, in their early sixties, who have made their way as crooks. Tommy has just been released from prison, and Mick has brought him back to the hotel, where he surprises his buddy with a story of how he has gone clean. No more crime, booze, or floozies for Mick, who has saved up enough dough for the both of them to get on a bus at 7 a.m. the next morning to head for a new start in Vegas. But a mischievous Tommy, anxious after seven years in the pen, gets into some trouble after being propositioned by the seductive Amber (Natasha Lyonne). Amber is a "whooore," as Tommy refers to her with his thick Brooklyn accent, and part of a small prostitution ring run by Rodan (Vinnie Jones) from within the building. After the encounter, Tommy finds that he has compromised Mick's plans for Vegas and must somehow avoid the twisted Rodan in order to make his escape.

Continue reading: Night at the Golden Eagle Review

The Big Bounce (2004) Review


Unbearable
Near the end of The Big Bounce, Owen Wilson's character tells the woman who has just conned him, "I have to be sober to tell this story." In my opinion, only a drunk would be able explain (or BS) his way through this mess of a movie, a remake of an equally bad film of the same name from 1969. Both films are based on the novel from acclaimed author Elmore Leonard, and though Leonard may be able to pen a worth-reading novel, it's plain to see that transposing his words into a worth-viewing film is often an impossible task.

In this Bounce, Wilson plays vagabond Jack Ryan, a man who's bad luck and bad choices have landed him on the North Shore of Oahu where he takes a job in construction working for shady hotel developer Ray Ritchie (Gary Sinise) and his assistant Bob Jr. (Charlie Sheen). It's not long before Jack gets fired and finds new employment as a handyman at a complex of vacation bungalows owned by Judge Walter Crewes (Morgan Freeman). While working for Crewes, Jack becomes enamored with Nancy Hayes (Sara Foster, the poor man's Bridget Fonda), Ritchie's sexpot girlfriend and house-sitter while he escorts his wife (Bebe Neuwirth) on shopping trips in Honolulu. Nancy has a plan to milk Ritchie out of $200,000, and she needs Jack's help to pull it off.

Continue reading: The Big Bounce (2004) Review

Steve Bing

Steve Bing Quick Links

News Pictures Film Comments RSS