Sterling Hayden

Sterling Hayden

Sterling Hayden Quick Links

Film RSS

Suddenly Review


Very Good
An interesting, almost experimental little film for 1954. Clocking in at 75 brisk minutes, it's also quite prescient: A man (Frank Sinatra) holes up in a suburban home, taking the family living there hostage for an hour or so. Why? He's going to assassinate the president, whose train will be pulling up at 5 o'clock, right across the street. Sinatra shelved the film after his friend JFK was assassinated many years later. It's now resurfaced to be experienced anew. It's not great filmmaking, but the way a major assassination like this is almost shruggingly planned and executed is quite interesting. The same film made today would involve three car chases, helicopters, and the house blowing up. Suddenly portrays a killing as something that you almost don't bother thinking about before it's done. Fascinating.

The Star Review


Good
Poor Margaret Elliot: A broke actress, past her prime, desperately holding on to her former glory. Were it not for Sunset Boulevard's appearance only two years earlier, people might actually have remembered The Star, a role for which Bette Davis earned an Oscar nomination but which now stands as a barely memorable and largely cliched performance.

The Star is a straight-up shot at a washed-up has-been. Her star years behind her, Davis's Elliot tries to fight her way back to the screen, failing to realize she's no longer a sexy vamp (Davis was 44 at the time) and nobody cares about her Oscar (here Davis is seen clutching one of her real statuettes) any more. It ultimately falls to old flame Barry Lester (Sterling Hayden in a remarkably soft and surprisingly quiet performance) to coax her back into reality, though his big idea -- that she should become a salesperson at Saks Fifth Avenue -- comes off as a little bit insulting.

Continue reading: The Star Review

Dr. Strangelove, Or: How I Learned To Stop Worrying And Love The Bomb Review


Essential
Only Stanley Kubrick could make a movie about World War III and make it one of the most hilarious films ever made. No, it doesn't hurt to have Peter Sellers in your film, either. And it doesn't hurt to have him in three roles (originally he was slated to play four, but a broken leg and trouble with Slim Pickens's southern accent kept him out of the B-52 that just might bring about Armageddon).

Ranking as filmcritic.com's #1 movie of all time in our recent Top 100 Films of the Millennium feature, I suppose we have some explaining to do as to why we picked it. Not only is the movie wickedly funny, it's a subversive anti-war film that shows just how easily a conflict could erupt and the end of the world be brought about. The cast is top notch, and Sellers would have stolen the show if George C. Scott, Pickens, and Sterling Hayden didn't keep taking it back. Never for five seconds is this film less than perfect -- from its devilish gags (courtesy of co-writer Terry Southern) to its hilarious improvisations (courtesy, of course, of Sellers) to its simply unpredictable plot. I've seen this movie two dozen times and each with each viewing not only do I get something more from it, but I keep thinking the ending is going to change.

Continue reading: Dr. Strangelove, Or: How I Learned To Stop Worrying And Love The Bomb Review

Winter Kills Review


Excellent
A real cult classic, this reimagining of the Kennedy assassination asks what might have gone down in an alternate and very similar universe. Based on the book by Manchurian Candidate author Richard Condon, the story gives us Nick Kegan (Jeff Bridges), the half-brother of a president assassinated 19 years earlier. Suddenly, evidence reveals there was more than one shooter that day (sound familiar?), sending him into a wild -- and often wildly funny -- hunt for his brother's actual killers. Dryly comedic, William Richert takes his directorial debut into impressive places -- and wow, check out that cast! Too bad it gets a little kooky in the end, but that doesn't detract much from a very fun movie.

The Asphalt Jungle Review


Extraordinary
Sterling Hayden gets the shaft again in The Asphalt Jungle. This guy goes on caper after caper but he just never ends up with the loot. It always slips right through his hands. Every time.

Jungle is one of Hayden's finest hours, earnest and searing as he finds himself wrapped up in the perfect crime -- a jewel heist which is (unfortunately) a rather simple safecracking affair. This time out, Hayden's desperate gambling addict looks about ready to do anything in order to get back to the pastoral farm where he grew up -- and we believe it.

Continue reading: The Asphalt Jungle Review

The Long Goodbye Review


Good
Robert Altman took a Raymond Chandler/Philip Marlowe novel -- God knows why -- and cast Elliot Gould as a private eye investigating a friend's death in the colorful 1970s, a far cry from the noirs of Bogie's Marlowe. It ends up with mixed results -- Marlowe is drawn as a goofy daydreamer (Altman calls him Rip Van Marlowe) and his story only gets interesting when Sterling Hayden, channeling Hemingway, goes bananas.

Nine To Five Review


Very Good
Strangely enough, I just realized after seeing this film again today (1999) that Teaching Mrs. Tingle is a crude rip-off of this movie (three women take boss hostage at his own home to teach him a lesson). Who'd a thunk!?

The Godfather Review


Essential
I remember the first time I viewed The Godfather. It was 25 years to the day after its initial theatre release, and it was being re-realased, as many films were at the time, for their anniversary. So, trotting to the Mercer Mall General Cinemas on Route one (I literally trotted, I was without car and always looking over my shoulder for fear of getting run over by one of those infamous New Jersey drivers (of which I am a member)), I bought my ticket and proceeded to get the seat, front and center, as normal, in one of the smaller screens in the theatre. As I recall, the last movie I had watched in there was Night Falls on Manhattan with Richard Dreyfuss, Ian Holm, and Andy Garcia. I had seen the famous first moments before, knew the parodies of it back and front, but had never seen the film itself.

In Italian: Molto bene.

Continue reading: The Godfather Review

The Killing Review


Excellent
Stellar Kubrick film noir. Underrated crime thriller -- one of his great, early works. Sterling Hayden shines (as he would years later in Dr. Strangelove) as a criminal mastermind who schemes to rob a horse track on race day. Intricately plotted and with nothing left to chance, he almost gets away with it.

Continue reading: The Killing Review

Sterling Hayden

Sterling Hayden Quick Links

Film RSS
Advertisement

Occupation

Actor


The Cast Of 'Will And Grace' Have Reunited, But What Are They Up To?

The Cast Of 'Will And Grace' Have Reunited, But What Are They Up To?

The NBC series ended a decade ago, but Will, Grace, Karen and Jack haven't changed a bit.

Advertisement
Robbie Williams Announces New Album 'Heavy Entertainment Show'

Robbie Williams Announces New Album 'Heavy Entertainment Show'

The album is Williams’ first release since 2013’s ‘Swings Both Ways’.

Dev Patel Is A Lost Boy In Touching True Story Drama 'Lion'

Dev Patel Is A Lost Boy In Touching True Story Drama 'Lion'

There's already an Oscars buzz surrounding this movie.

Advertisement

Sterling Hayden Movies

Dr. Strangelove, Or: How I Learned To Stop Worrying And Love The Bomb Movie Review

Dr. Strangelove, Or: How I Learned To Stop Worrying And Love The Bomb Movie Review

Only Stanley Kubrick could make a movie about World War III and make it one...

Advertisement
Artists
Actors
    Filmmakers
      Artists
      Bands
        Musicians
          Artists
          Celebrities
             
              Artists
              Interviews
                musicians & bands in the news
                  actors & filmmakers in the news
                    celebrities in the news

                      Go Back in Time using our News archive to see what happened on a particular day in the past.