Stephen Tobolowsky

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Mr. Peabody & Sherman - Teaser Trailer


Mr. Peabody is doubtlessly the most intelligent and most accomplished dog on the planet, and undeniably outshines the human race too. However, despite his achievements, he is determined to maintain a normal life for his adopted human son Sherman by inviting round Penny a classmate of his with whom he wants Sherman to be friends. She has other ideas, however, and only shows interest when Sherman agrees to show her Mr. Peabody's WABAC - a time machine in which they travel into the past despite being expressly forbidden. When Peabody finds out, he realises that their actions have ripped a hole in the space-time continuum and they are forced to return to the past to re-write history and save the universe. Along the way they meet some of the biggest legends of history, including Leonardo Da Vinci and Sigmund Freud, who help them on their quest.

'Mr. Peabody & Sherman' is a brilliantly funny animated movie based on the characters from the 'The Rocky and Bullwinkle Show' in the sixties in the 'Peabody's Improbable History' segments. It has been directed by Rob Minkoff ('The Lion King', 'Stuart Little', 'The Haunted Mansion') and written by Ted Key ('Hazel', 'The Million Dollar Duck', 'Gus') and Craig Wright ('Dirty Sexy Money', 'Underemployed'). 'Mr. Peabody & Sherman' is set for release in the UK on February 7th 2014.

Click Here To Read - Mr. Peabody & Sherman Movie Review

The Texas Film Hall Of Fame Awards

Stephen Tobolowsky - The Texas Film Hall Of Fame Awards held at Austin Studios - Austin, Texas, United States - Thursday 7th March 2013

Stephen Tobolowsky
Stephen Tobolowsky
Stephen Tobolowsky
Stephen Tobolowsky

FOX Fall Eco-Casino Party At The Bookbindery

Guests and Stephen Tobolowsky Monday 10th September 2012 FOX Fall Eco-Casino Party at The Bookbindery

Guests and Stephen Tobolowsky
Stephen Tobolowsky
Stephen Tobolowsky
Stephen Tobolowsky

Fox All-Star Party Held At Soho House - Arrivals

Stephen Tobolowsky Monday 23rd July 2012 Fox All-Star party held at Soho House - Arrivals

Stephen Tobolowsky
Stephen Tobolowsky
Stephen Tobolowsky

20th Anniversary Screening Of 'Thelma & Louise' At The Academy Of Motion Picture Arts And Sciences Samuel Goldwyn Theater

Stephen Tobolowsky Thursday 25th August 2011 20th anniversary screening of 'Thelma & Louise' at the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences Samuel Goldwyn Theater Beverly Hills, California

Stephen Tobolowsky
Stephen Tobolowsky
Stephen Tobolowsky

Buried Review


OK
A high-concept premise with a fiendishly claustrophobic setting, this film at least has the courage of its own convictions. And Reynolds delivers a relentlessly effective performance. So it's a shame that it's not more involving than it is.

After being ambushed while working as a driver in Iraq, private contractor Paul (Reynolds) wakes up in the dark, and his lighter shows him that he's inside a coffin-shaped wooden box. There's also a mobile phone in there, and soon Paul is communicating with the kidnapper (Perez), who demands that he make a video plea for ransom. Paul also contacts both his company's emergency manager (Tobolowsky) and a government agent (Paterson) who promises to help. But time is running out as Paul uses up both the breathable air and his phone battery.

Continue reading: Buried Review

The Time Traveler's Wife Review


Excellent
Adapting Audrey Niffenegger's wonderfully complex novel to the screen can't have been easy, but Rubin (Ghost) has written a thoroughly engaging film. The heavy emotional tone makes it feel a bit girly, but it's still a terrific story.Henry (Bana) has time-travelled since the night his mother (Nolden) died in a car crash. He can't control his "trips", although he seems to go to places with an emotional resonance. When he first meets Clare (McAdams), she's in her 30s and has known him since she was 6 (Proulx). As a result of this paradox, their relationship develops very differently for each of them. Eventually they find friends (Livingston and McLean) who are in on Henry's condition. And a doctor (Tobolowsky) who may be able to help.Director Schwentke invests the film with a lush visual style that circles around the characters as they try to make sense of their life together. Subtle effects and clever editing work extremely well, even if Mychael Danna's music is a little too insistently weepy. And while the premise presents Henry's condition as something like epilepsy, the film can hardly help but start feeling like a terminal illness drama, as signs of impending tragedy start to appear.Bana is good in what's essentially a thankless role. The script doesn't offer him much personality beyond earnestness, so Bana plays him as a nice guy just trying to muddle through. Opposite him, McAdams is a wonderful breath of fresh air, really capturing Clare's steely resolve and quiet pain. Livingston and Tobolowsky are also extremely good in far too few scenes.There's definitely the sense that this film is edited down from a richer, more detailed novel. One problem is that Henry's ageing is far too subtle, so we're never quite sure which time he's travelling from (see Christopher Nolan's Memento or, better yet, Following, for how to do this well). And although we notice loose threads and missing scenes, the editors have done a remarkable job of making such a fragmented tale hold together both emotionally and logically.

And in the end, the film compellingly explores the nature of relationships while quietly moving us to all kinds of tears.

Thelma & Louise Review


Essential
Thelma & Louise is a landmark film, one that defines the cinematic terrain for female empowerment and one that effortlessly blends powerful ideas about gender with an endlessly engaging story. The film weaves a story about women in distress, who come from depressed backgrounds and seedy locales, which is not entirely different from any prototypical Lifetime Movie of the Week. The genius of Ridley Scott's direction and Callie Khouri's groundbreaking screenplay is that they allow the film to flirt with standard archetypal conventions, all the while upending conventional notions of women -- particularly women in the sort of situation Thelma and Louise find themselves in.

The movie jumps headfirst into the action without any necessary build-up or labored background. We meet Louise, a headstrong waitress, and her younger, flighty friend Thelma (Geena Davis) as they finalize plans for their road trip. Nothing more or less complicated than that. Where they are going is fairly vague; why they are going is more telling: their explicit purpose in taking a trip is to escape from the men in their lives. Jimmy (Michael Madsen), Louise's longtime casual partner, is a gruff mechanic who loves Louise, but doesn't know how to show it. Darryl (Christopher McDonald), Thelma's husband, is a plain loser, a carpet salesman with a cheesy mustache, bouffant-fro, and a lack of respect for his wife.

Continue reading: Thelma & Louise Review

Wearing A Neck Brace As He Leaves A Medical Building With His Wife Insisting To The Photographers That He Is Fine

Stephen Tobolowsky - Actor Stephen Tobolowsky Los Angeles, California - wearing a neck brace as he leaves a medical building with his wife insisting to the photographers that he is fine Tuesday 5th August 2008

Stephen Tobolowsky
Stephen Tobolowsky
Stephen Tobolowsky
Stephen Tobolowsky
Stephen Tobolowsky

Garfield: The Movie Review


Bad
At the very least, Garfield: The Movie explains why Bill Murray wore such a long face after Sean Penn picked up the Best Actor Oscar at this year's Academy Awards ceremony. Apparently Murray had already seen a finished cut of the film and knew that the minute this cinematic litter box liner hit theaters, his chance of ever winning a golden boy would grow as slim as Calista Flockhart on the Atkins diet.

Blame the source material. The repetitive and one-dimensional Garfield is loosely based on Jim Davis' repetitive and one-dimensional comic strip. For those unfamiliar with the 'toon, Garfield's a tubby tabby with a taste for lasagna. He barely tolerates his wimpy owner, Jon Arbuckle (Breckin Meyer), and engages in a love-hate relationship with Odie, a dopey but earnest pooch.

Continue reading: Garfield: The Movie Review

Sneakers Review


Extraordinary
A delirious guilty pleasure, Sneakers is about as probable as me parting the Red Sea -- and just as fun. I mean, can you imagine: Redford, Poitier, Strathairn, Aykroyd, Phoenix, McDonnell, Kingsley -- all in one film? You'd expect at least six Oscars just on names alone. No such luck here, but this latter-day WarGames is an all-out riot.

The Operator Review


Very Good
Exhibit A in why you shouldn't be rude to telemarketers, no matter your mood.

Indie flick The Operator is a hybrid black comedy/Hitchcock thriller about a real cad named Gary (Michael Laurence) -- a lawyer, quite naturally -- who "reaps what he sows" after telling off a vengeful telephone operator. Gary cheats on his wife (and his mistress), gambles, spends the savings on a fancy car, and represents dirtbags at the office. When the stress of his life gets too much to bear, he lets a poor Ma Ball employee we known only as Shiva (Jacqueline Kim) take the brunt of his wrath, which she turns back upon him in spades.

Continue reading: The Operator Review

Little Black Book Review


Weak
Fall is approaching, and with it comes the next wave of lighthearted romantic comedies that are all that stands between the lonely, desperate women of America and a long, cold winter of depression and self-loathing. First out of the gate is Little Black Book, a cutesy comedy that offers about as much insight into the perils and wonder of human relationships as just about any daytime drama, but with a few laughs thrown in.

As the opening credits roll, we meet Stacy (Brittany Murphy), a young college grad heading out into the exciting world of low-budget television production. She dreams of one day working with her childhood idol, Diane Sawyer. And her mother loves Carly Simon. I don't know why the part about Carly Simon is important, but it's a recurring theme throughout the film. If her mother ever actually got any screen time, perhaps the Carly Simon thing would become at least marginally relevant to the story. But no dice. Even so, we're treated to several inexplicable Carly Simon moments that have nothing to do with anything, really, and don't add anything of substance to the film.

Continue reading: Little Black Book Review

National Security Review


Terrible

Director Dennis Dugan, who cut his teeth on Adam Sandler's insincere feel-good flick "Big Daddy" before cranking out the most rank movie of 2001 ("Saving Silverman"), apparently spent last year attending an Action-Comedy 101 classes. But if he graduated, it was by the skin of his teeth.

His new film is "National Security," a bungled mess of a buddy picture starring screwball talent Steve Zahn ("Joy Ride") as an ex-cop security guard teamed with one-schtick Martin Lawrence, who plays a police academy reject that got Zahn kicked off the force and thrown in jail with false accusations of police brutality.

Such race-based humor (if you can call it that) is Dugan's crutch -- the movie consists mostly of Lawrence employing his hyperactive, increasingly embarrassing ghetto clown routine to drive Zahn to vein-popping frustration.

Continue reading: National Security Review

Freaky Friday Review


Very Good

Hitting the nail on the head of mother-daughter relationships -- and doing so with amusing savvy and imaginative good humor -- Disney's "Freaky Friday" remake is such a sublimely fun-for-all matinee delight that it cleansed my palate of the sour taste of every bad movie I've seen this summer.

Yes, it's a live-action Disney family movie -- which has traditionally been enough to send shudders down the spine of anyone over the age of 11. But director Mark S. Waters ("Head Over Heels") eschews the studio's history of pandering triteness in favor of sharp writing, credibly clever characters and terrific performances.

Magnetic Linsday Lohan (whose charm also carried the studio's 1998 "Parent Trap" remake) and a revitalized Jamie Lee Curtis couldn't be more ideally cast as exasperated teenager Annabell Colman and her harried, head-shrinker mom Tess, both of whom are given new insights into their contentious relationship when their bodies are swapped through a fortune-cookie hex.

Continue reading: Freaky Friday Review

Stephen Tobolowsky

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Stephen Tobolowsky Movies

Mr. Peabody & Sherman - Teaser Trailer Trailer

Mr. Peabody & Sherman - Teaser Trailer Trailer

Mr. Peabody is doubtlessly the most intelligent and most accomplished dog on the planet, and...

Buried Movie Review

Buried Movie Review

A high-concept premise with a fiendishly claustrophobic setting, this film at least has the courage...

Garfield: The Movie Movie Review

Garfield: The Movie Movie Review

At the very least, Garfield: The Movie explains why Bill Murray wore such a long...

Freaky Friday (2003) Movie Review

Freaky Friday (2003) Movie Review

On the surface, Freaky Friday has all the signs of being awful -- horrible trailer,...

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