Stephanie Leonidas

Stephanie Leonidas

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Stephanie Leonidas - 23rd Raindance Film Festival - 'Meet Pursuit Delange: The Movie' premiere - Arrivals at Vue Cinema Regent Street - London, United Kingdom - Thursday 1st October 2015

Stephanie Leonidas

Stephanie Leonidas - A host of British television stars were photographed on the red carpet at The National Television Awards 2015 which were held at the O2 arena in London, United Kingdom - Wednesday 21st January 2015

Stephanie Leonidas

Stephanie Leonidas - Cast members from 'Defiance' make an appearance in the press room at San Diego Comic Con 2014 - San Diego, California, United States - Saturday 26th July 2014

Stephanie Leonidas
Stephanie Leonidas
Stephanie Leonidas

Stephanie Leonidas - The Jameson Empire Awards 2014 held at Grosvenor House - Arrivals - London, United Kingdom - Sunday 30th March 2014

Stephanie Leonidas
Stephanie Leonidas

Uwantme2killhim? Review


Excellent

British director Andrew Douglas (2005's Amityville Horror remake) takes a clever look at youthful naivete in this strikingly inventive thriller, which is based on a true story. Its focussed perspective lets us see the events unfold as the main character might, and watching him misinterpret everything is seriously unsettling.

That character is the cool North London teen Mark (Blackley), who avoids his annoying parents (Womack and Delamere) by hiding in his room while chatting online to local teen Rachel (Winstone). She has gone into witness protection because of her brutish boyfriend (Johnston), and she asks Mark to look out for her nerdy little brother John (Regbo), who's being bullied in school. As they hang out together, Mark and John strike up a friendship. But when Rachel disappears, Mark begins chatting online to an MI5 agent (White) who convinces him that he needs to take violent action to save lives at school.

Right from the start, we suspect that something is up with the people Mark meets in internet chatrooms. But we also understand why he doesn't question anything: the setting is 2003, rife with still-gurgling paranoia after 9/11 and Columbine. Also, the film intercuts Mark's story with the aftermath of his actions, as he's interviewed by a tenacious detective (Downton Abbey's Froggatt). So we know that we are seeing the people he's chatting to through his mind's eye, which is why director Douglas makes the eerie decision to show them talking to their computers rather than just typing. We question whether they're real, but Mark never does.

Continue reading: Uwantme2killhim? Review

Stephanie Leonidas - Fan Expo Canada 2013 at the Toronto Metro Convention Centre - Day 3 - Toronto, Canada - Saturday 24th August 2013

Stephanie Leonidas
Stephanie Leonidas
Dewshane Williams, Stephanie Leonidas, Jaime Murray, Julie Benz, Grant Bowler and Graham Greene

How To Stop Being A Loser Review


Weak
This British rom-com has enough energy to keep us watching even though it's not particularly funny or romantic. Fortunately there are enough bright sparks in the cast to distract us from the simplistic script and over-egged direction.

James (Phillips) is a geeky misfit who has a sign above his head saying "loser". Literally. After his friend Ian (Grant) commits suicide, he receives a message from him that challenges him to learn how to talk to women. His friends (Leonidas and Grezo) encourage him to try, starting with an awkward chat at Ian's funeral with his school crush Hannah (Atkinson). He then starts a mentorship with cocky motivational speaker Ampersand (Conway), a disciple of womanising writer guru Zeus (Kemp). But this will require changing almost everything about himself.

Continue reading: How To Stop Being A Loser Review

MirrorMask Review


Good
If the 1980s Bowie/puppet fantasy campfest Labyrinth had been redone by British Dali fetishists with a deep love of The Wizard of Oz, the result might have been something like the ambitious but flawed MirrorMask. A joining of forces between the dark imaginations of graphic novel auteurs Neil Gaiman and Dave McKean (screenwriter and director, respectively) and the technological prowess of the Jim Henson Workshop, it attempts to create a more substantive cinematic fantasy world than today's SpongeBob and Playstation-besotted kids may be used to. As such, this admittedly stupendous-looking film deserves quite a lot of credit for trying, even if the end result never quite makes it.

A central problem with MirrorMask is that the story (as will be obvious even to those not familiar with Gaiman and McKean's work on such landmark graphic novels as Sandman and Books of Magic) is something the two of them could have dashed off in one coffee-fueled afternoon. Helena (Stephanie Leonidas) is an angry teenager whose parents (Gina McKee, Rob Brydon), to her eternal dismay, run a tatty circus that takes up all their time. As a family crisis comes to a boil - Mum goes into hospital while Dad tries to keep everything from falling apart and the circus employees wonder how they're going to get paid - Helen, who'd much rather have normal parents than eccentric showpeople, falls into a dream world where she's on a quest to find the MirrorMask, a magical object that will allow her to escape the Dark Lands and return to her family. Maybe. She just has to figure out what the MirrorMask is. And what it looks like.

Continue reading: MirrorMask Review

Yes Review


Bad
Rambling monologues featuring rhyming dialogue. Lead characters named "He" and "She." Camerawork aching to be lauded in Film Comment. A maid serving as a philosophical voice of reason. It's all there in Yes, Sally Potter's endless, numbing cinematic essay on... on... something.

"She" (Joan Allen) is a London-based scientist (born in Belfast, raised in America) whose open marriage to her stoic, stuffy husband (Sam Neill) is dying a slow, painful death. "He" (Simon Abkarian) is a cook from Beirut, who meets her at a party, beginning a torrid affair that puts both on a physical and emotional trek taking them to Beirut, Belfast, New York, and a groovy Cuba.

Continue reading: Yes Review

MirrorMask Review


Good
If the 1980s Bowie/puppet fantasy campfest Labyrinth had been redone by British Dali fetishists with a deep love of The Wizard of Oz, the result might have been something like the ambitious but flawed MirrorMask. A joining of forces between the dark imaginations of graphic novel auteurs Neil Gaiman and Dave McKean (screenwriter and director, respectively) and the technological prowess of the Jim Henson Workshop, it attempts to create a more substantive cinematic fantasy world than today's SpongeBob and Playstation-besotted kids may be used to. As such, this admittedly stupendous-looking film deserves quite a lot of credit for trying, even if the end result never quite makes it.

A central problem with MirrorMask is that the story (as will be obvious even to those not familiar with Gaiman and McKean's work on such landmark graphic novels as Sandman and Books of Magic) is something the two of them could have dashed off in one coffee-fueled afternoon. Helena (Stephanie Leonidas) is an angry teenager whose parents (Gina McKee, Rob Brydon), to her eternal dismay, run a tatty circus that takes up all their time. As a family crisis comes to a boil - Mum goes into hospital while Dad tries to keep everything from falling apart and the circus employees wonder how they're going to get paid - Helen, who'd much rather have normal parents than eccentric showpeople, falls into a dream world where she's on a quest to find the MirrorMask, a magical object that will allow her to escape the Dark Lands and return to her family. Maybe. She just has to figure out what the MirrorMask is. And what it looks like.

Continue reading: MirrorMask Review

Yes Review


Weak
I usually give Sally Potter a lot of slack; I've enjoyedall three of her feature films so far ("Orlando," "The TangoLesson" and "TheMan Who Cried"), even if I've been alonein doing so. She's an intelligent and sensitive filmmaker who usually establishesbreathing room for her deeply felt characters.

However her latest film, "Yes," is a failed experiment.Joan Allen plays an Irish-born woman stuck in a loveless, childless marriageto a philandering husband (Sam Neill). She meets a Lebanese cook (SimonAbkarian) who was once a surgeon in Beirut, and begins a love affair. Writtenentirely in verse, "Yes" requires the actors to suffer throughlong passages of blathering talk, and the scenes routinely dry out longbefore they end.

Potter attempts to add layers to the film by hinting atpolitical paranoia and showing scenes through surveillance cameras, butthe verse angle nullifies these attempts. The superb Allen is capable ofextremes: from icy control to dropping her emotional guard, yet she cannotmake this film's rhythms work.

Shirley Henderson, playing a maid who observes the actionand breaks the fourth wall by speaking directly to the camera, shows justhow the film might have played. With her silky, slithering delivery, sheplays with the words like a snake might toy with a mouse.

Stephanie Leonidas

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Stephanie Leonidas Movies

Uwantme2killhim? Movie Review

Uwantme2killhim? Movie Review

British director Andrew Douglas (2005's Amityville Horror remake) takes a clever look at youthful naivete...

How to Stop Being a Loser Movie Review

How to Stop Being a Loser Movie Review

This British rom-com has enough energy to keep us watching even though it's not particularly...

MirrorMask Movie Review

MirrorMask Movie Review

If the 1980s Bowie/puppet fantasy campfest Labyrinth had been redone by British Dali fetishists with...

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Yes Movie Review

Yes Movie Review

Rambling monologues featuring rhyming dialogue. Lead characters named "He" and "She." Camerawork aching to be...

MirrorMask Movie Review

MirrorMask Movie Review

If the 1980s Bowie/puppet fantasy campfest Labyrinth had been redone by British Dali fetishists with...

Yes Movie Review

Yes Movie Review

I usually give Sally Potter a lot of slack; I've enjoyedall three of her feature...

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