Stefano Accorsi

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Celebrities Attend The Valentino Show As Part Of The Paris Fashion Week Menswear Spring/Summer 2015

Stefano Accorsi and Bianca Vitali - Celebrities attend the Valentino show as part of the Paris Fashion Week Menswear Spring/Summer 2015 - Paris, France - Wednesday 25th June 2014

Stefano Accorsi and Bianca Vitali
Stefano Accorsi and Bianca Vitali

Saturn In Opposition Review


Good
Italians have the nicest kitchens, and we get to ogle several of them in Saturn in Opposition, a crowded and talky drama centering around the reaction of a large group of friends to the sudden death of the brightest light of the group, the charismatic man who brought them all together in the first place. Come to think of it, what we have here is an upscale and literate Italian Big Chill.

It's 30-year-old Lorenzo (Luca Argentero) and his lover Davide (Pierfrancesco Favino) who attract friends to their dinner parties. Troubled married couple Antonio (Stefano Accorsi) and Angelica (Margherita Buy) are regulars, as are Davide's ex Sergio (Ennio Fantastichini), drug-addled Roberta (Ambra Angiolini), and, most memorably Neval (Serra Yilmaz), a short and fat truth teller who busts through the rest of the group's fibs and vague comments with cutting remarks. She's the one who can be counted on to keep things somewhat lively.

Continue reading: Saturn In Opposition Review

The Last Kiss (2001) Review


Bad
Watching The Last Kiss is one of the most uncomfortable experiences I've had in a movie theater since I worked at a multiplex and a girl I had a severe crush in high school saw me in my nerd uniform of a sleeveless sweater and clip-on tie. [Oh Pete, you rake, you! - Ed.]

At least that encounter lasted no more than a minute. For nearly two hours in The Last Kiss, aimless characters bitch, moan, and argue about how their lives stink. Doors are slammed, tears are shed, and immaturity is flaunted about like a homecoming banner. Almost every character deserves to have their head dunked in a bucket of ice water. The number of self-inflected drama fits and crying jags makes this movie feel more like a non-stop cry for attention, than an attempt at any kind of satisfying entertainment.

Continue reading: The Last Kiss (2001) Review

The Son's Room Review


Very Good
For those who associate Italian cinema with Fellini and "high art," The Son's Room is an inventive, subtle alternative. Written by, directed, and starring Nanni Moretti, it takes us through the slow, complicated path of bereavement.

Slow is the best description for the film at first. It takes its time in establishing the habits of what appears to be a normal, happy family. Father and mother both work but still find the time to support their son and daughter through homework and after school activities. They laugh, spend free time together, and reprimand the kids for innocent wrongs with a sigh and soft pat on the shoulder. You get the feeling there is open communication and unconditional love amongst the foursome.

Continue reading: The Son's Room Review

The Last Kiss Review


Bad
Watching The Last Kiss is one of the most uncomfortable experiences I've had in a movie theater since I worked at a multiplex and a girl I had a severe crush in high school saw me in my nerd uniform of a sleeveless sweater and clip-on tie. [Oh Pete, you rake, you! - Ed.]

At least that encounter lasted no more than a minute. For nearly two hours in The Last Kiss, aimless characters bitch, moan, and argue about how their lives stink. Doors are slammed, tears are shed, and immaturity is flaunted about like a homecoming banner. Almost every character deserves to have their head dunked in a bucket of ice water. The number of self-inflected drama fits and crying jags makes this movie feel more like a non-stop cry for attention, than an attempt at any kind of satisfying entertainment.

Continue reading: The Last Kiss Review

His Secret Life Review


Good

Already tormented by grief over the auto-accident death of her loving husband, an upper-middle class Italian widow receives another psychological blow in "His Secret Life" when going through his personal effects. She discovers he was having an affair. For seven years. With another man.

An emotionally resounding, life-affirming film of surprising connections and affections, the story sees Antonia (Margherita Buy) brought out of her despondency by the determination to face down her husband's lover. But instead she finds herself becoming friends with the sexy, rugged, 30-year-old artist named Michele (Stefano Accorsi), despite receiving a catty cold shoulder at first.

"Now he's gone and I still have to put up with you? No way," Michele protests. "I couldn't even go to his funeral. All I have left is a stack of photographs."

Continue reading: His Secret Life Review

Stefano Accorsi

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Stefano Accorsi Movies

The Last Kiss (2001) Movie Review

The Last Kiss (2001) Movie Review

Watching The Last Kiss is one of the most uncomfortable experiences I've had in a...

The Son's Room Movie Review

The Son's Room Movie Review

For those who associate Italian cinema with Fellini and "high art," The Son's Room is...

The Last Kiss Movie Review

The Last Kiss Movie Review

Watching The Last Kiss is one of the most uncomfortable experiences I've had in a...

His Secret Life Movie Review

His Secret Life Movie Review

Already tormented by grief over the auto-accident death of her loving husband, an upper-middle class...

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