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BroadwayCon Day One

Stark Sands - Day one of BroadwayCon at the New York Hilton Midtown Hotel. at New York Hilton Midtown Hotel, - New York, New York, United States - Friday 22nd January 2016

Stark Sands
Stark Sands

Fox Summer TCA All-Star Party

Stark Sands - Fox Summer TCA All-Star party at SOHO HOUSE - West Hollywood, California, United States - Friday 7th August 2015

Stark Sands
Stark Sands

2015 Television Critics Association Summer Press Tour - FOX All-Star Party

Stark Sands - Celebrities attend 2015 Television Critics Association Summer Press Tour - FOX All-Star Party at Soho House. at Soho House - Los Angeles, California, United States - Friday 7th August 2015

Stark Sands
Stark Sands
Stark Sands
Stark Sands

Inside Llewyn Davis Review


Excellent

The Coen brothers have a wry twinkle in their eyes as they take us on a lyrical journey with a hugely likeable musician for whom success is only barely out of reach. It's also an engaging exploration of both the the early 1960s New York folk music scene that gave us Bob Dylan and the tenacity it takes to make your dreams come true.

It's 1961, and Llewyn Davis (Isaac) isn't sure he wants to fight anymore. His career has stalled, and he's moving from couch to couch trying to pick up gigs. But he doesn't have anything to lose, and when he inadvertently acquires a pet cat he has a bit of purpose for a change. On the other hand, his longtime friendship with husband-and-wife folk duo Jim and Jean (Timberlake and Mulligan) is strained when Jean tells him she's pregnant with a child that might be his. In need of cash, he takes a job in Chicago, taking a long road-trip with two nutcases (Hedlund and Goodman). And he even considers re-enlisting in the Merchant Marines.

Despite Llewyn's quiet desperation, the Coens keep the film's tone light and endearing, with constant comical touches that keep us smiling right to the cleverly elliptical ending. They also pack the movie with folk music that's gorgeously produced by T Bone Burnett, offering emotive counterpoints to Llewyn's sardonic sense of humour. His snappy wit often gets him into trouble, but we can immediately see his depth of character as well, and Isaac is terrific in the role, the kind of guy we would happily spend a lot more time with.

Continue reading: Inside Llewyn Davis Review

Video - Oscar Isaac Joined By Co-Stars At 'Inside Llewyn Davis' NYFF Premiere - Part 1


Oscar Isaac, the main star of music drama 'Inside Llewyn Davis', was snapped on the red carpet at the movie's premiere at the 2013 New York Film Festival. He was joined by his co-stars Jeanine Serralles, Max Casella and Stark Sands with his wife Gemma Clarke. The movie was the winner of the Grand Prize of the Jury at the 2013 Cannes Film Festival.

Continue: Video - Oscar Isaac Joined By Co-Stars At 'Inside Llewyn Davis' NYFF Premiere - Part 1

Frank Wildhorn And Friends Concert At Birdland

Orfeh and Stark Sands - Frank Wildhorn and Friends Concert held at Birdland Jazz Club. - New York, NY, United States - Tuesday 16th July 2013

Orfeh and Stark Sands
Orfeh
Orfeh
Orfeh, Stark Sands, Frank Wildhorn, Adrienne Warren and John Treacy Egan
Orfeh
Orfeh

Frank Wildhorn And Friends Concert At Birdland

Stark Sands - Frank Wildhorn and Friends Concert held at Birdland Jazz Club. - New York, NY, United States - Wednesday 17th July 2013

Stark Sands
Stark Sands and John Treacy Egan
Stark Sands
Adrienne Warren and Stark Sands
Adrienne Warren and Stark Sands
Stark Sands

Inside Llewyn Davis Trailer


Llewyn Davis is a struggling folk musician attempting to find his place in the world by scouring New York's Greenwich Village at the height of folk in 1961. Along the way he meets old friends who are not particularly happy to see him because of his own unresolved mistakes in the past, and while he strives to find a venue to do what he loves doing, hitchhiking across roads in the freezing winter with a beat-up guitar and a homeless cat, he is forced to question not only himself as a person, but also where and what he really wants his future to be.

'Inside Llewyn Davis' is an emotional musical drama written and directed by Oscar winners Ethan Coen and Joel Coen, aka The Coen Brothers ('No Country for Old Men', 'True Grit', 'Fargo'). It has been very loosely based on the posthumous 2005 memoirs 'The Mayor of MacDougal Street' by the late New York folk artist Dave Van Ronk, and has been nominated to compete for the sought after Palme d'Or prize at the 2013 Cannes Film Festival. This passionate story about love, music, finding oneself and learning from one's mistakes will hit screens in the UK on January 24th 2014.

Inside Llewyn Davis Movie Review - Click Here To Read

Die, Mommie, Die Review


Excellent
Charles Busch loves the movies. More specifically, he loves the grand dames of classic American cinema. He loves them so much that he likes to dress up like them and retell their best stories with campy humor. Just try to count the movies from which he has borrowed bits and pieces to build Die, Mommie, Die, and try to count the actresses he channels. You'll notice bits of Bette Davis, Joan Crawford, Jane Wyman, Rosalind Russell, and even Susan Hayward's memorable Helen Lawson from Valley of the Dolls.

The movies? Sunset Boulevard; Hush, Hush, Sweet Charlotte; Whatever Happened to Baby Jane?; Bette Davis's spooky/nutty 1964 thriller Dead Ringer; and every picture directed by Douglas Sirk are just a few of Busch's touchstones.

Continue reading: Die, Mommie, Die Review

11:14 Review


OK
Car crashes seem to be ripe material for screenwriters looking for a hook to hang their movies on. From Intersection to Crash to Crash (the other one), this seems to be a well-travelled genre. 11:14 adds another notch in that post, a Rashomon-like story of a half-dozen characters who all intersect on one quiet road at 11:14 PM, which results in the loss of at least one life, one male member, a lot of cash, and endless property damage. The immediate before and after of the event contain even more chaos, including a gunshot wound for Hilary Swank.. The film tells each story in sequence, each time adding a little more context to this bizarre series of events, and each time causing us to care a little bit less about what exactly happened. It's not terrible filmmaking, but the plot's "cleverness" will hardly knock your boots off.

Catch That Kid Review


OK
There's an important lesson every male should learn, even at a young age: Women always get their way. You listening, fellas? Pack it up, party's over, that's the way of the world. The likable but unambitious Catch That Kid delivers this bubble-bursting curveball to ten-year-old boys everywhere, delivering a preteen heroine that knows the only way to make things happen. Be a playa.

She's a cute tomboy named Maddy (Kristen Stewart, Panic Room), a determined mountain climber-in-training who idolizes her dad (Sam Robards) and helps her overworked mom (Jennifer Beals). She's got two pint-sized buddies: Gus (Max Thieriot), a mini-Mr. Fix-It who loves go-karts and really digs Maddy, and Austin (Corbin Bleu), a crack technology whiz who also really digs Maddy.

Continue reading: Catch That Kid Review

Pretty Persuasion Review


Excellent
In a time when the collected works of Hilary Duff and Lindsay Lohan have looked like they could suck out whatever feeble life is left in the high school film, along comes a black-hearted piece of nastiness like Pretty Persuasion to remind us that, yes, nothing can simultaneously shock and entertain quite so well as a teenager let loose.

It must be said that things don't begin well, however, with its focus the film's star bitch, 15-year-old Kimberly Joyce (Evan Rachel Wood), who looks to be the queen of her snotty private high school in Beverly Hills. Appearing at first to be the result of some hideous experiment whereby Reese Witherspoon's Election spunk and drive was spliced with the power-lusting evil of at least a couple of the Heathers, Kimberly soon shows herself to be an entirely different sort of villain. In the process of escorting a quiet new Arab student, Randa Azzouni (Adi Schnall), around campus and explaining to her the facts of life and a clinical cost/benefit analysis of the two of them being friends (Randa gets to hang out with one of the school's stars, while Kimberly thinks she looks prettier standing next to Randa), Kimberly drops in this little nugget, "I have respect for all races. But I'm really happy to have been born white." She then proceeds to list, in descending order, the races she would prefer to be, and then patiently explains to Randa - in her flat, rational, almost toneless voice - exactly why Arab would be her last choice ("No offence.").

Continue reading: Pretty Persuasion Review

Die, Mommie, Die Review


Excellent
Charles Busch loves the movies. More specifically, he loves the grand dames of classic American cinema. He loves them so much that he likes to dress up like them and retell their best stories with campy humor. Just try to count the movies from which he has borrowed bits and pieces to build Die, Mommie, Die, and try to count the actresses he channels. You'll notice bits of Bette Davis, Joan Crawford, Jane Wyman, Rosalind Russell, and even Susan Hayward's memorable Helen Lawson from Valley of the Dolls.

The movies? Sunset Boulevard; Hush, Hush, Sweet Charlotte; Whatever Happened to Baby Jane?; Bette Davis's spooky/nutty 1964 thriller Dead Ringer; and every picture directed by Douglas Sirk are just a few of Busch's touchstones.

Continue reading: Die, Mommie, Die Review

Pretty Persuasion Review


Unbearable

Like some sketch-comedy Frankenstein monster made from the cutting-room entrails of "Clueless," "The Opposite of Sex," "To Die For," "Election" and "Heathers," the puerile social satire "Pretty Persuasion" is stinging only insomuch as its unsophisticated wit and overwhelming smugness are painful to sit through.

Writer Skander Halim and director Marcos Siega clearly watched all these movies before cranking out this disingenuous dark comedy about a manipulative, 15-year-old private-school tart (Evan Rachel Wood) who accuses a teacher (Ron Livingston) of sexual harassment just to get famous. But they didn't learn a thing from those droll, original pictures about sardonic nuance or creating a feeling of camaraderie towards an unsympathetic anti-heroine.

Wood ("Thirteen"), in a rudimentary role far beneath her proven talent, never shies away from the dangerously sharp edges of Beverly Hills brat Kimberly Joyce, who takes down her two best friends (and fellow accusers), an ambitious TV reporter (Jane Krakowski) and her father's business in her pursuit of her 15 minutes. But there's no wicked delight to be had in her machinations, which are so transparently premeditated that all the other characters in the movie (detectives, judges and lawyers included) have to be certifiable morons in order to advance the plot.

Continue reading: Pretty Persuasion Review

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