Spencer Breslin

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Dolphin Tale 2 Trailer


'Dolphin Tale' saw Sawyer Nelson and Dr. Clay Haskett save the life of a beached dolphin named Winter who was so badly injured, she needed a special prosthetic fin fitted in order to survive. She was thus housed in the Clearwater Marine Hospital with a motherly dolphin named Panama. However, following Panama's tragic passing, Winter's future could look very lonely indeed unless the staff at the hospital can find her a new friend to share her life with; an action that is stringently required lest she is moved to another aquarium. That's where Hope comes in; an incredibly tiny dolphin who the Clearwater staff have shipped over to join Winter. The question is, is Winter's heartbreak over Panama's death too much to deal with in spite of new company?

Continue: Dolphin Tale 2 Trailer

Stuck In Love Trailer


William Borgens was once a highly regarded novelist, however after a heart-breaking divorce with his wife Erica who left him for a younger, more handsome man, he hasn't been able to write a single word. He just spends his days thinking about the time they had together and spying on them through their windows. His pretty friend-with-benefits, Tricia, who is also divorced, does her best with her sometimes overly honest opinions to force him to get back to dating. Meanwhile, his promiscuous and cynical daughter Samantha is having her first book published while struggling to come to terms with the idea of love and still refusing to speak to her mother after she left her father, and his son Rusty, who is also an aspiring writer, tries to show one troubled and vulnerable girl that he is the guy for her.

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Picture - Spencer Breslin and Abigail Breslin Washington DC, USA, Friday 7th November 2008

Spencer Breslin and Abigail Breslin - Spencer Breslin and Abigail Breslin Washington DC, USA - Jane Goodall Institute's second annual Global Leadership Awards at the Ronald Reagan Building and International Trade Center Friday 7th November 2008

Harold Review


Terrible
Late in the inept comedy Harold, the title character (Spencer Breslin) arrives at a friend's house, and the pal's father comes to the front door. A close-up lingers on the dad as if to say "Check it out, a really fun cameo!" The only problem is we have no idea who this actor is. And that's because he's not an actor -- he's the director's brother. If you think putting an unknown sibling in a movie is funny, stick around.

Despite Harold being remarkably amateurish, the concept is there, as you'd expect from a long-time Saturday Night Live veteran like director/co-writer T. Sean Shannon. A teenage kid named Harold has a bizarre case of early baldness and an attitude to match. He dresses horribly, walks with a hunched, old-man shuffle, and loves Murder, She Wrote. He's a cranky version of 14 Going on 74.

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Picture - Spencer Breslin New York City, USA, Thursday 19th June 2008

Spencer Breslin Thursday 19th June 2008 New York premiere of Picturehouse's 'Kit Kittredge: An American Girl' New York City, USA

Spencer Breslin

Picture - Spencer Breslin , Thursday 19th June 2008

Spencer Breslin at the Ziegfield Theater New York Premiere of Picturehouse`s 'Kit Kittredge: An American Girl' Thursday 19th June 2008

Spencer Breslin

Picture - Spencer Breslin and Nikki Blonsky New York City, USA, Wednesday 30th April 2008

Spencer Breslin and Nikki Blonsky - Spencer Breslin and Nikki Blonsky New York City, USA - Premiere of 'Harold' at 62nd and Broadway Cinema Wednesday 30th April 2008

The Santa Clause 3: The Escape Clause Review


Grim
Of the many things I dislike about the Santa Clause series, the one that bothers me the most, the very very most, is this: Now, whenever any of the critics on this site tries to write the name "Santa Claus" they almost invariably spell it "Santa Clause." That extra "e" is absolutely maddening, and it is everywhere I look, unintentionally.

Against all odds, the e-happy Santa Clause series is back with a third installment, which involves Santa (Tim Allen) facing off against the Napoleon-complexed Jack Frost (Martin Short), who's got his eyes on the prize of being the supremo wintertime icon. His idea is to take advantage of a rare "escape clause" which lets Santa step down willingly if he says a certain phrase, so Frost can sieze the big red suit. Naturally, trickery is involved. Apparently Jack Frost is a very bad boy. You can tell by the fright wig hairdo.

Continue reading: The Santa Clause 3: The Escape Clause Review

Zoom Review


Grim
Upon its release, Zoom was instantly reviled not only as one of the worst movies of 2006, but one of the worst movies ever made. As I write this it's hovering as the 15th worst film ever per the IMDB's (admittedly unscientific) "bottom 100," one run below Troll 2.

Is Zoom worse than #17 Phat Girlz? Worse than Glitter (#23)? Worse than Alone in the Dark (#38)? Zoom is hardly a masterpiece, but, really now, it isn't that bad.

Continue reading: Zoom Review

The Santa Clause 2 Review


OK
Eight years ago, Scott Calvin (Tim Allen) inadvertently caused the death of Santa Claus. Ever since, he's been wearing the bright red suit himself, delivering countless toys to millions of children all over the world on one special night a year. This Christmas, however, things aren't going as smoothly for Santa, because he hasn't yet fulfilled an important part of his contract...the part about a Mrs. Claus. Calvin must find a wife before Christmas Eve, because if he doesn't, his duties as the head Claus will vanish forever!

Apart from the North Pole, much has changed since the original Santa Clause. Calvin's son, Charlie (Eric Lloyd), has become an embittered teenager who rebels against society by spraying graffiti on the walls of his school. Charlie's mother and stepfather (Wendy Crewson and Judge Reinhold), blame his misbehavior on Calvin's absence, but Principal Newman (Elizabeth Mitchell) doesn't care about the reasons behind the misbehavior, she just wants it to stop.

Continue reading: The Santa Clause 2 Review

The Shaggy Dog Review


Grim
In the summer of 2003, Disney scored with its update of Freaky Friday, employing the talents of gifted writer Leslie Dixon (Mrs. Doubtfire), Jamie Lee Curtis, and a pre C-cup Lindsay Lohan. The movie not only was a surprise box office hit, but very funny. Lohan deservedly became a star, a fact people are starting to forget, and we re-discovered Curtis's crack comic timing.

Now, with Pixar and DreamWorks making family films kids and parents cherish for different reasons -- The Incredibles being a prime example -- Disney would have been smart to stick to the formula that earned Freaky Friday over $110 million at the box office and critical kudos. It doesn't seem that difficult.

Continue reading: The Shaggy Dog Review

The Kid (2000) Review


Excellent
Remorse is a dangerous thing in the mind of a man. It can hold a person down, quell his dreams, suffocate innocence, and convert people into intolerable beasts. People often think that if they could go back in time and reverse the wrongs done to them, a great weight would be somehow lifted from their shoulders. Beat up that bully that destroyed your self-esteem, kiss the girl you were in love with, stand up to the father that used you for a whipping post. These memories haunt the minds of individuals all around us like the ghosts of the Winchester Mansion.

What if you really had the chance to change all of that? What if you could talk to yourself when you were only eight years old and explain how to take a stand for yourself, give the younger you understanding of why dad is so angry at the world, and give yourself hope for retaining individuality in a sea of conformity. In the new Disney film The Kid Russ Duritz gets that once in a lifetime chance.

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Raising Helen Review


Grim
The poster for Raising Helen features Kate Hudson, in a pose suited for a bearskin rug, sporting shorts shorter than the Hulk's temper and fuzzy boots last seen at the hottest strip joint in Anchorage. It's an attempt at marketing a warm and fuzzy movie for guys 25 to 34, but the poster is really a harbinger for how misguided Garry Marshall's latest effort is.

Raising Helen is all about Hudson, who stars in the title role, when it should focus on other topics -- the ties of family, coping with tragedy, and starting your life from scratch. The movie harps on how Helen's glamorous life is turned upside down when she is bequeathed her sister's three kids. The story should be on how hard it is for the kids, rather than Helen's bemoaning how fat her ass has gotten.

Continue reading: Raising Helen Review

The Santa Clause 2 Review


OK
Eight years ago, Scott Calvin (Tim Allen) inadvertently caused the death of Santa Claus. Ever since, he's been wearing the bright red suit himself, delivering countless toys to millions of children all over the world on one special night a year. This Christmas, however, things aren't going as smoothly for Santa, because he hasn't yet fulfilled an important part of his contract...the part about a Mrs. Claus. Calvin must find a wife before Christmas Eve, because if he doesn't, his duties as the head Claus will vanish forever!

Apart from the North Pole, much has changed since the original Santa Clause. Calvin's son, Charlie (Eric Lloyd), has become an embittered teenager who rebels against society by spraying graffiti on the walls of his school. Charlie's mother and stepfather (Wendy Crewson and Judge Reinhold), blame his misbehavior on Calvin's absence, but Principal Newman (Elizabeth Mitchell) doesn't care about the reasons behind the misbehavior, she just wants it to stop.

Continue reading: The Santa Clause 2 Review

Spencer Breslin

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