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68th Annual Cannes Film Festival

Sophie Marceau - 68th Annual Cannes Film Festival - Celebrity Sightings at Cannes Film Festival - London, United Kingdom - Sunday 17th May 2015

Sophie Marceau
Sophie Marceau
Sophie Marceau
Sophie Marceau
Sophie Marceau

68th Annual CFF - 'Sea of Trees' - Premiere

Sophie Marceau - A variety of celebrities were photographed as they took to the red carpet at the 68th Annual Cannes Film Festival for the premiere of 'Sea of Trees' in Cannes, France - Saturday 16th May 2015

Sophie Marceau
Sophie Marceau
Sophie Marceau
Sophie Marceau

Mad Max: Fury Road Red Carfpet, 68th Annual Cannes Film Festival, Cannes, France

Sophie Marceau - Celebrities attends the premiere for "Mad Max: Fury Road" for the 68th Annual Cannes Film Festival in Cannes, France. at Cannes Film Festival - London, United Kingdom - Thursday 14th May 2015

68th Annual Cannes Film Festival - 'Mad Max: Fury Road' - Premiere

Sophie Marceau - A host of stars were snapped as they took to the red carpet for the 68th Annual Cannes Film Festival and the premiere of 'Mad Max: Fury Road' in Cannes, France - Thursday 14th May 2015

Sophie Marceau and Guillermo Del Toro
Sophie Marceau
Sophie Marceau

68th Annual Cannes Film Festival

Sophie Marceau - 68th Annual Cannes Film Festival - Jury - Photocall at Cannes Film Festival - London, United Kingdom - Wednesday 13th May 2015

Sophie Marceau
Sophie Marceau
Sophie Marceau
Sophie Marceau
Sophie Marceau

A Midsummer Night's Dream Review


Weak
A Midsummer Night's Dream is hardly Shakespeare's best work. Memorable only for the role of the impish Robin "Puck" Goodfellow (Tucci, here), Midsummer is a rambling and disjointed play that tries to blend plotlines involving unrequited love, fellows putting on a play, and of course, fairies. Does this blend very well? Not really, and Midsummer has always felt totally out of whack to me. Of course, if you want to see Calista Flockhart rolling in the mud and Kevin Kline turned into a donkey, well, whatever floats your boat.

Beyond The Clouds Review


OK
Michelangelo Antonioni obsesses on the naked bodies of a good half-dozen Euro-stars in this wandering tour of western European sexual relations in various combinations. Based on a collection of his own short stories, Antonioni connects four such tales (infidelity, happenstance, old-fashioned horniness, etc.) with the narrative of a film director (John Malkovich) who's looking for a story to base his next movie on. We find we're lucky enough if we can just get one story out of this two-hour ordeal, which wanders aimlessly in art-house hell as often as it enchants.

Continue reading: Beyond The Clouds Review

Braveheart Review


Excellent
Mel Gibson deserves a lot more credit than I've been giving him. A few years ago, no one could have conceived that the action star could pull off the lead role in a dazzling, epic, historical adventure-thriller-romance, let alone direct it. But he does, making Braveheart a vastly entertaining and powerful film.

Gibson plays Scottish hero William Wallace, a Scotsman with simple roots who finds himself thrust into a role as leader of the Scottish revolt against England in the late 13th century. After the despicable King Edward the Longshanks (Edward I) decrees that English nobles will have the right to sexual relations with all newly-wed Scottish women, the revolution is set in motion. Wallace takes up the cause, only to find himself facing incredible odds against a superior English army and fighting Scottish nobles who want to negotiate peace instead of fight. In fact, it's the nobles who turn out to be the bigger obstacle.

Continue reading: Braveheart Review

A Midsummer Night's Dream Review


Weak
A Midsummer Night's Dream is hardly Shakespeare's best work. Memorable only for the role of the impish Robin "Puck" Goodfellow (Tucci, here), Midsummer is a rambling and disjointed play that tries to blend plotlines involving unrequited love, fellows putting on a play, and of course, fairies. Does this blend very well? Not really, and Midsummer has always felt totally out of whack to me. Of course, if you want to see Calista Flockhart rolling in the mud and Kevin Kline turned into a donkey, well, whatever floats your boat.

The World Is Not Enough Review


Grim
I'll preface this review with the disclaimer that I am indeed aware that James Bond thrillers do not bear any semblance to real-life scenarios. I'll also say that since I was a kid I've been a huge Bond fan.

And I'll also say that The World Is Not Enough is one of the worst Bond films to come along in years.

Continue reading: The World Is Not Enough Review

Alex And Emma Review


Grim
We've seen enough romantic comedies to know how the formula works -- guy gets girl, guy loses girl, guy gets girl back. Because these films are so ridiculously predictable by nature, a successful romantic comedy will have to masquerade its obvious intentions behind a story that leads us to the obligatory ending in an unconventional way. And for two thirds of director Rob Reiner's Alex and Emma, the story cleverly disguises what we perceive, and gives us every indication we're witnessing something fresh. Unfortunately, the final third reverts back to the conventional, and the film falls dramatically short of its potential.

Alex Sheldon (Luke Wilson) is a budding novelist suffering from a severe case of writer's block that is holding him back from starting his book and getting the paycheck he desperately needs. Alex's debt collectors have given him only 30 days to complete his novel, collect the money, and pay of his gambling debt. Otherwise, Alex's life story will come to an end. Almost out of options, Alex convinces stenographer Emma Dinsmore (Kate Hudson) to quickly translate his thoughts to the written word. The story Alex tells pertains to a 1920s romantic triangle between grade school tutor Adam Shipley (also played by Wilson), the beautiful French matriarch (Sophie Marceau) of Shipley's charges, and the family au pair Anna (Hudson).

Continue reading: Alex And Emma Review

Lost & Found Review


Grim
At last the public's thirst for a David Spade-Sophie Marceau comedy is quenched with this story of a hapless restaurant owner who kidnaps his neighbor's dog in order to get cozy with her. Harmless, yet painfully stupid. The first down a black hole sucking that Sophie Marceau's career has taken since Braveheart. (See also The World is Not Enough.)

The World Is Not Enough Review


Grim

The honeymoon is over for Pierce Brosnan's incarnation of James Bond.

Just as Brosnan has begun to clearly distinguish his own bent on the character -- less loquacious than his predecessors, with an artful but well-bred smirk, quick to resort to lethal measures, yet an acute vulnerability when it comes to his bed mates -- most everything else that made the 1990s 007 renaissance such a smartly balanced mix of classic Bond and modern action has already been turned into a tired, caricature-like shadow of itself in "The World Is Not Enough."

The new, sassy and independent Miss Moneypenny (Samatha Bond) has been relegated back to desk duty and her banter reduced to a routine of spiritless double-entendres. Coming off her "Shakespeare In Love" Oscar win, Judi Dench's delightfully dour M has been laboriously humanized, given a conscience that doesn't suit her.

Continue reading: The World Is Not Enough Review

A Midsummer Night's Dream Review


Weak

I've always seen "A Midsummer Night's Dream" as one of Shakespeare's daffier comedies -- what with the fairies and all -- so this film version, adapted by director Michael Hoffman ("One Fine Day," "Restoration"), came as something of a surprise because it takes itself so seriously.

Hoffman seems to hold the Bard's less jestful observations on amour ("The course of true love never did run smooth") in higher regard than his saucy slapstick of miscommunication.

The laughs are definitely present, but they're subdued as two pairs of young sweethearts steal away into the forest (of 19th Century Tuscany in this adaptation) trying to escape the consequences of an arranged marriage, and rush headlong and unknowingly into the domain of impishly interfering immortals.

Continue reading: A Midsummer Night's Dream Review

Alex & Emma Review


Zero

After wishing I could claw my eyes out through "How to Lose a Guy in 10 Days" and now "Alex and Emma" -- the two worst romantic comedies of the year to say the very least -- if I never see another Kate Hudson movie it will be too soon.

The bland but likable young actress has made nothing but stinkers since showing early promise as a slapstick comedienne in "200 Cigarettes" and playing a hesitant bride-to-be in "Dr. T and the Women" before peaking in 2000's "Almost Famous," starring as a rock-band groupie with a heart of gold. But in 2003, she's played two insufferable, irritating-passing-as-cute romantic leads in a row, in two insufferably dopey, counter-programming chick flicks.

February's "Lose a Guy" (up against male-targeted blockbusters "Shanghai Knights" and "Daredevil") featured Hudson as a superficial magazine relationship columnist who deliberately sets out to snare a boyfriend then drive him away -- and in the process has the same effect on any viewer without a fortified tolerance for women who act nauseatingly clingy, cutesy-poo and insecure.

Continue reading: Alex & Emma Review

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