Sir Paul McCartney enjoys the "freedom" of his post-Beatles career.

The singer chose a more experimental vein for his first solo albums after the Beatles split in 1970, but as he gravitated back toward pop music with his next band, Wings, he worked hard to establish a new sound which was different to the Beatles.

He explained: "I certainly was enjoying the freedom of just doing something different. I've always been like that, and I still am. And then, the other element was that I knew I couldn't just try and make a carbon copy of The Beatles - I knew that was impossible; without John, George and Ringo there was no way I could do that.

"So I knew I had to try and make something new. So each of the albums was to try and establish an identity for Wings that would then be recognised in time as Wings music - the Wings sound."

The 68-year-old singer admitted The Departure of lead guitarist Henry McCullough and drummer Denny Seiwell the night before they jetted to Nigeria to record the album 'Band On The Run' -inspired him to go on and produce the "best album" he ever made.

He added to ClashMusic: "That was like a bombshell. You can imagine me getting off that phone call: it was like, 'Ah. Okay. Try and hold your nerve; try and keep it together.'

"What do we do now? S*d it, we're going'. And at that moment it was one of those, 'I'll show you. I will make the best album I've ever made now. I will put so much effort into it because I wanna just prove that we didn't need you guys'."