Sigurjon Sighvatsson

Sigurjon Sighvatsson

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Killer Elite Review


OK
Testosterone oozes from every pore of this 1980s-set thriller. It's based on Rannulph Fiennes' book The Feather Men, which claims to recount true events but is frankly very hard to believe. Fortunately, the high-octane cast helps make the false bravado rather entertaining.

Danny (Statham) thinks he's left his black-ops life behind for a quiet farm in the Outback with lusty neighbour Anne (Strahovski), but he's forced back to work when his colleague Hunter (De Niro) is kidnapped. To free him, Danny must kill three ex-SAS agents, which raises the suspicion of a mythical committee of former operatives who protect their own. They send Spike (Owen) to stop Danny and his cohorts (Purcell and Young), but clearly there's an even deeper operation underway, and everyone's heading for trouble.

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Brothers Review


Good
This remake of Susanne Bier's 2004 drama is an equally powerful story of family tensions and how violence affects more than just the victim. But the original Danish film's strained melodrama translates here as well.

Sam Cahill (Maguire) is a loyal Marine getting ready to head back to Afghanistan with his men. His wife Grace (Portman) is trying to be strong for their young daughters (Madison and Geare), but his stern father (Shepard) couldn't be prouder. Just before he ships out, Sam's black-sheep brother Tommy (Gyllenhaal) gets out of prison and, when Sam is reported killed in action, he rises to the challenge to help care for Grace and the girls. But several months later Sam is found, and what he experienced has left him dangerously paranoid.

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Red Rock West Review


Excellent
With J.T. Walsh, Dennis Hopper, and Lara Flynn Boyle in your desert thriller, it's hard to go wrong, and in his riveting sophomore feature, John Dahl rarely gets tripped up. Why, even Nicolas Cage is in fine form, filling this small movie with wit and a surprising toughness that is refreshing in a world of pulled punches and pointless violence. Tragically, Dahl's output has slowly meandered into irrelevant Hollywood fluff, but you can remember some of his great, early work with this film. It gets a little self-consciously twisty in the last act, but it's all good. This trip through the Wyoming desert (though none of it was shot there) is one you won't soon forget.

Wild At Heart Review


OK
Was there any film so anxiously awaited in the late 1980s and early 1990s as Wild at Heart? The picture was released to a cult that had just been born: that of its director, David Lynch, whose Blue Velvet, in 1986, had reaped an enthusiastic following among the mainstream hipsters who had missed Eraserhead in 1977, and whose budding appetite for Lynch's singular brand of the macabre had been whetted by the prime-time ghoulishness of 1990's Twin Peaks. Wild at Heart's Palme d'Or win at Cannes just before its 1990 release only tantalized more; and after what seemed for Lynch's starving fans a nearly eternal wait, the film opened at last to high expectations, but decidedly mixed reviews.

Wild at Heart was puzzling, because it was screwed up and it was hard to figure out why. Time - and, 14 years later, the DVD release - helps to clear up that central enigma. Based very loosely on Barry Gifford's novel, this manic, Southern Gothic road movie now seems too deliberately weird. And in retrospect the cause seems to be that its creator, a strange man if the available evidence of his films is to be believed, and one who then was only recently revered as a certain type of genius, was trying so hard just to be himself.

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The Weight Of Water Review


Weak
Like Possession, The Weight of Water tries to tie together a period romance and a modern-day one, held together by ancient letters calling out from the past. Like Possession, this fails to work well, as the link between now and then is relatively meaningless.

In the present day, our heroine (the dour Catherine McCormack) asks her brother (Josh Lucas) to sail her to an island off the coast of New Hampshire in order to take pictures of the site of an ancient murder for some photography assignment. Already dubious (I've seen few magazine spreads that feature only grass and rocks), the story gets iffier when her "famous poet" husband (Sean Penn) and bro's girlfriend (Elizabeth Hurley) tag along on the trip.

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Kill Me Again Review


Good
A capable first film noir from John Dahl (Red Rock West, The Last Seduction) relies far too much on coincidence and no-one-would-really-do-that moments to work. Kilmer and his then-wife Whalley make a good pair as a bad excuse for a private investigator and the woman who hires him to fake her death. When the cops and the various criminals in pursuit of her (including Madsen in his most over-the-top role ever) catch up, it's a madhouse of slaughter! Nice try, but Dahl's later work is better (okay, not including Unforgettable).

A Thousand Acres Review


Bad
This adaptation (read: poor imitation) of Shakespeare's King Lear sports Michelle Pfeiffer, Jessica Lange, and Jennifer Jason Leigh as the three twisted sisters of ailing king Jason Robards -- only this time the kind is a farmer with a whopping 1000 acres. Parcelling the property becomes a headache thanks to Leigh's ungrateful bitch of a daughter, and soon enough a legal battle ensues... not to mention accusations of abuse, alcoholism, and every other hot-button sin you could name. No one is good in this movie. Everyone plays a variation on the annoying sad sack -- Pfeiffer probably being the worst of all. I don't know anything to redeem the movie except for an understated performance from Leigh -- unless you're into masochism. Avoid.

Kalifornia Review


Excellent
Never mind the typo in the title. It was seven long years between Dominic Sena's first movie, Kalifornia, and the claptrap he started pumping out after that (beginning with Gone in 60 Seconds). I guess you can forget a lot in that kind of time, because Kalifornia shows the kind of promise that undoubtedly got him work later in life. A road trip story with a twist, David Duchovny and Michelle Forbes play hipster artistes stuck in Kentucky, looking to move to California and write a book on infamous serial killers along the way. Along for the ride are Brad Pitt and Juliette Lewis as people who should probably stay in Kentucky... and never mind if Pitt's Early Grayce doesn't have a few bodies buried in his past. A very well-written and suspenseful film, Kalifornia is an underrated and underseen gem. The ending bogs down a bit, but it's definitely worthwhile.

Basquiat Review


Weak
Basquiat -- or "Sasquiatch," as I am becoming increasingly fond of calling this film -- may teach you a thing or two. Now you may not want to know any of the stuff you learn during its two long hours of running time, but like it or not, you will learn something.

That something is a base level of information about Jean Michel Basquiat, a Haitian artisté in the early '80s who became Andy Warhol's favorite son. (What is it with Warhol movies this year?) Basquiat rose from living in a cardboard box and decorating the streets of New York with cryptic graffiti to a high-profile yet short-lived career in the highest of art circles. All before his not-too-untimely death at the age of 27 from a (take a guess) heroin overdose.

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Sigurjon Sighvatsson

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Kit Harington And Maisie Williams Tease 'Game Of Thrones' Season 7

Kit Harington And Maisie Williams Tease 'Game Of Thrones' Season 7

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Johnny Depp Sends First Divorce Payment Straight To Charities

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Sigurjon Sighvatsson Movies

Killer Elite Movie Review

Killer Elite Movie Review

Testosterone oozes from every pore of this 1980s-set thriller. It's based on Rannulph Fiennes' book...

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Basquiat Movie Review

Basquiat Movie Review

Basquiat -- or "Sasquiatch," as I am becoming increasingly fond of calling this film --...

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