Sidney Lumet

Sidney Lumet

Sidney Lumet Quick Links

News Pictures Film Quotes RSS

Stella Adler School of Acting Benefit at Cipriani

Sidney Lumet and Sheila Nevins - Sidney Lumet & Sheila Nevins New York City, USA - Stella Adler School of Acting Benefit at Cipriani Monday 17th March 2008

New York Film Festival 2007 - Premiere of 'Before The Devil Knows You're Dead'

Sidney Lumet, Amy Ryan and Ethan Hawke - Sidney Lumet, Amy Ryan, Ethan Hawke New York City, USA - New York Film Festival 2007 - Premiere of 'Before The Devil Knows You're Dead' Friday 12th October 2007

New York Film Festival 2007 - Premiere of 'Before The Devil Knows You're Dead'

Sidney Lumet Friday 12th October 2007 New York Film Festival 2007 - Premiere of 'Before The Devil Knows You're Dead' New York City, USA

Sidney Lumet
Sidney Lumet
Sidney Lumet
Sidney Lumet
Sidney Lumet

Prince of the City Review


OK
Before there was The Departed, before there was Donnie Brasco, there was this tale of cop corruption and undercover work, directed by a down-the-rabbit-hole Sidney Lumet. Based on a true story, Prince features a rather bland Treat Williams as Danny Ciello, who goes undercover to expose corruption in (where else) the NYPD. Naturally, he soon learns that just about everyone is on the take, including his own partners. Eventually, Ciello himself becomes suspect for his prior drug use. The film starts off strong as Ciello starts delving into the underworld of corrupt cops, but eventually starts to repeat itself and bog down as it hits its third hour. Fortunately, numerous supporting stars keep it largely worth watching.

Continue reading: Prince of the City Review

Find Me Guilty Review


Unbearable

There's a serious losing streak as far as "true stories" in cinema are going. It's an open invitation to drizzle overdone sentimentality and turn crass tear-jerking into box office gold (see Glory Road or North Country?). That being said, that kind of stuff is spun gold in the face of the haphazard bile that is being thrown at the audience in Sidney Lumet's latest film, Find Me Guilty.

The film opens with Tony Campagna (Raul Esparza) making a panicked phone call to an unnamed person. He immediately goes from there to the home of his cousin, "Fat Jack" DiNorscio, a lone shark and cocaine dealer, and shoots him five times. For reasons unknown, DiNorscio survives, but refuses to rat on Tony. To him, ratting on family and friends is worse than death, and he tells his daughter that as she sits next to his hospital bed. Soon enough, Jack is in jail and part of a massive trial with most of the New Jersey crime family. In court, Jack befriends a lawyer (Peter Dinklage) but refuses his council, deciding to represent himself instead, against the wishes of mob boss Nick Calabrese (Alex Rocco). DiNorscio makes terrible jokes, but like all naïve if not honest men, he's endearing in a certain way, especially to Judge Finestein (Ron Silver). His charming and quirky attitude in court is hard to stand but seems to work on the jury, as they go in the room to deliberate on what would become the longest court case in U.S. history.

Continue reading: Find Me Guilty Review

Q & A Review


OK
Sidney Lumet's sprawling cop/DA drama shows promise but ends up muddled and confused, the victim of a few too many subplots and side characters -- all of whom get killed. Nolte is hilariously bad and good at the same time as a corrupt cop, while Hutton is the earnest DA trying to bust him. Remarkably mediocre.

Continue reading: Q & A Review

Night Falls on Manhattan Review


OK
With Night Falls on Manhattan, Sidney Lumet has created one of the most dedicated issue movies in a long time. As a high-profile, yet righteous, defense attorney (a first in modern film), Richard Dreyfuss's character admits that he took an unwinnable case because he wanted to expose corruption in the NYPD. Lumet seems to have created an unwinnable film for similar reasons.

Lumet has taken a very bare-bones approach with the plot of Night Falls on Manhattan. One minute Andy Garcia's Sean Casey is an assistant DA trainee, the next minute he is the District Attorney of New York. Likewise, the first twenty minutes of the film set up a courtroom drama which Lumet flies through in a series of quick scenes. Unconventional editing techniques, including periodic jump cuts and abrupt truncations of scenes that barely seem to have begun, help push the narrative forward, all of which serves to confuse the audience as to the film's true focus.

Continue reading: Night Falls on Manhattan Review

Sidney Lumet

Sidney Lumet Quick Links

News Pictures Film Quotes RSS