Shirley Temple

Shirley Temple

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Biography

Shirley Temple (23.4.1928 - 10.2.2014) Shirley Temple was an American film and television actress, most famous for her work as a child actress during the 1930s.

Net Worth: At the time of her death in 2014, Shirley Temple had a net worth of 30 million USD, according to Celebrity Net Worth.

Childhood: Born in Santa Monica, California, to Gertrude Amelia Temple and George Francis Temple, Shirley Temple was encouraged from a young age to learn singing, dancing and acting. At the age of two, Temple was learning at Meglin's Dance School in Los Angeles. By the age of three, she had already signed an acting contract with Educational Pictures to appear in their show Baby Burlesks. In 1932, Temple appeared in her first feature film The Red-Haired Alibi, and when Educational Pictures went bankrupt the following year, her father bought back her contract for 25 USD.

Career: In 1933, Shirley Temple stared in her first major role in the film Stand Up and Cheer! for Fox Films. As Temple became more and more of a box-office draw, she began to earn a higher and higher paycheque, working for 1000 USD a week in 1934. This year also saw Temple win the first ever Juvenile Oscar for her accomplishments at that time. In 1935, Temple's salary increased to 2,500 USD a week as she began to work on around four films per year, following Fox Films' merge with 20th Century Pictures in the same year.

President Roosevelt commented on how she was bringing such joy to the depression era American people. Between this and her official retirement from films in 1950, Shirley Temple stared in 43 feature films, as well as 14 short films and 25 storybook movies.

Personal life: In 1945 at the age of 17, Shirley Temple married John Agar and they had a daughter three years later. In 1949, the couple separated and Temple met and married Charles Alden Black in 1950. On the 10th of February, 2014, Shirley Temple died of natural causes at the age of 85.



Biography by Contactmusic.com

Conchita Wurst performs at The George

Veda, Conchita Wurst and Shirley Temple Bar - Eurovision 2014 winner Conchita Wurst performs at The George during Dublin Pride - Dublin, Ireland - Saturday 28th June 2014

A Week In News: America's Darling Dies, Samuel L Jackson Feels The Fury, Flappy Bird Meets Its Maker


Shirley Temple Samuel L Jackson Shia LaBeouf Julia Roberts Drake Philip Seymour Hoffman Billy Ray Cyrus Vivienne Westwood

Shirley Temple

RIP Shirley Temple: For younger generations, the death of Shirley Temple may not be as heart-rending as for those who grew up with the adorable, depression-era actress and watched her help pull America out of its slump. Temple died peacefully at home aged 85 on the 10th February after a life of reinventing herself and bringing joy to others through her many talents. You may or may not know that Temple was huge in China, but why? Find out here. Shirley Temple: 1928-2014.

Samuel L Jackson Makes Himself Clear: Samuel L Jackson has been involved in what was arguably the biggest foot-in-mouth moment of the year so far. In an interview with KTLA's so-called "entertainment reporter," Sam Rubin, Jackson was asked about his recent Super Bowl commercial...only, the Robocop actor didn't have a Super Bowl commercial, leading to quizzical stares and the immortal quote "what Super Bowl commercial?" as it dawned on the star that Rubin had him confused with fellow black actor, Laurence Fishburne. Read about the fall-out and watch the toe-curling video here.

Continue reading: A Week In News: America's Darling Dies, Samuel L Jackson Feels The Fury, Flappy Bird Meets Its Maker

Shirley Temple's Innocence Made Her A Mega Star, In Post-Communist China


Shirley Temple

In the wake of Shirley Temple's death at the age of 85, the world has reminded itself of what a prominent and vital star she was. The actress died of natural causes on the 10th February at home in Woodside, California. As the world woke up to the death of a beloved actress, for one country in particular, the grief was particularly poignant.

Shirley Temple
Former Child Star, Shirley Temple Black, Died Earlier This Week, Aged 85.

It's not exactly common knowledge that Temple's popularity enjoyed a revival in a country that was just waking up to the wonders and possibilities of Western movies. By the late eighties, the Depression-era child actress had been retired for 40 years and was even nearing the end of her career as a US diplomat. However, in China, the lovable child star was enjoying fevered fandom and a strastospheric re-ascent to fame.

Continue reading: Shirley Temple's Innocence Made Her A Mega Star, In Post-Communist China

Shirley Temple: 'The Little Princess' Who Helped America Through The Great Depression


Shirley Temple

Shirley Temple, who died today at the age of 85, was a child actress unlike any other, in a career which began when she was just three years old, Temple became the first child actress who can truly be deemed a movie star and America's shining light during the Great Depression.

Shirley TempleShirley Temple, who died today aged 85

In the early 1930s, when economic strife led America into the Great Depression, the unlikely source of hope and inspiration for many movie-goers was a curly-haired child who sang and danced across the silver screen into the nation's hearts. Shirley Temple began her performing career at just three years old and by six she was a bona-fide star.

Temple's fist breakthrough role came in 1933’s 'Stand up and Cheer', a movie which focused on efforts to boost morale during the Great Depression. What movie makers had not foreseen was that the film’s child star would end up being the era’s biggest box office draw and single handedly kept up morale  throughout the trouble era. She would steal the show for the first time during the film's musical number ‘Baby take a Bow’, her first memorable onscreen song and dance number.

Continue reading: Shirley Temple: 'The Little Princess' Who Helped America Through The Great Depression

After Life Of Reinvention, The Original Child Star Shirley Temple Has Died


Shirley Temple

In more regrettable news this week, former child star and 20th century icon Shirley Temple has died at the age of 85. Her death was announced by her agent. Temple was considered by many to have been the original child star. She began her career in the 1930s and starred in her breakthrough film, 1934’s Stand Up and Cheer at the tender age of six. Before that, she had attended acting, dancing and singing classes and played bit parts in various educational films under her mother’s guidance.

Shirley TempleShirley Temple has Died Aged 85

She went on to star in a total of 43 films in the 1930s and 40s, including Curly Top and Bright Eyes, before she officially retired from acting at age 21. During this time, she married John Agar, an Air Corps sergeant (Shirley was 17 at the time) and the couple had a child together. The marriage soon ran into trouble and the two were divorced by 1950, with Temple retaining custody of the child. The divorce coincided with Temple’s retirement from Hollywood, following a string of unsuccessful films. This was far from the end of Shirley’s time in the spotlight, however.

Continue reading: After Life Of Reinvention, The Original Child Star Shirley Temple Has Died

Picture - Sonia Lennon, Miss Shirley Temple... Dublin, Ireland, Sunday 15th March 2009

Sonia Lennon and Shirley Temple - Sonia Lennon, Miss Shirley Temple Bar Dublin, Ireland - The Alternative Miss Ireland contest held in The Olympia Theatre Sunday 15th March 2009

Fort Apache Review


Extraordinary
Fort Apache is a John Wayne vehicle often mentioned on the short list of best westerns (The Ox-Bow Incident, Shane, The Wild Bunch, The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance, and High Noon lead the posse). Typical of John Ford westerns, but more adventurous than most of them, Fort Apache offers Ford's trademark mix of solid entertainment, soap, occasional shoot-'em-ups, and reverie.

In this one, the Duke is a cavalry officer stationed in Apache territory who is sympathetic to the Indians' plight. He is forced to choose between challenging the Apaches and disobeying his commanding officer, a hapless Northeasterner (Henry Fonda). The straight-arrow role arguably fits Wayne better than the conflicted heroes and bad guys he played in The Searchers, Red River, and other films.

Continue reading: Fort Apache Review

Fort Apache Review


Extraordinary
Fort Apache is a John Wayne vehicle often mentioned on the short list of best westerns (The Ox-Bow Incident, Shane, The Wild Bunch, The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance, and High Noon lead the posse). Typical of John Ford westerns, but more adventurous than most of them, Fort Apache offers Ford's trademark mix of solid entertainment, soap, occasional shoot-'em-ups, and reverie.

In this one, the Duke is a cavalry officer stationed in Apache territory who is sympathetic to the Indians' plight. He is forced to choose between challenging the Apaches and disobeying his commanding officer, a hapless Northeasterner (Henry Fonda). The straight-arrow role arguably fits Wayne better than the conflicted heroes and bad guys he played in The Searchers, Red River, and other films.

Continue reading: Fort Apache Review

Walt: The Man Behind the Myth Review


Weak
Desperate for information about the pioneering legend behind Mickey Mouse and a whole boatload of classic animated characters? Well, Walt: The Man Behind the Myth will give you all the details, presented in an almost clinical style which Walt Disney would likely have abhorred.

Continue reading: Walt: The Man Behind the Myth Review

The Story of Seabiscuit Review


Grim
While the 2003 Seabiscuit has its share of factual license, it can't hold a candle to the utterly contrived The Story of Seabiscuit, a mere Shirley Temple love story set against the backdrop of the (at the time) recent success of Seabiscuit in the thoroughbred horse racing world. The only actual reason to watch this film -- which has Temple and her dad coming over from Ireland in order to train the horse and lead him to victory -- is the black and white footage of Seabiscuit's actual races, incorporated into the film. It's the only genuine part of the movie, and the only part worth watching.
Shirley Temple

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