Shirley Henderson Page 2

Shirley Henderson

Shirley Henderson Quick Links

News Pictures Video Film RSS

T2 Trainspotting Review

Excellent

It's been 20 years since we last saw four freewheeling young junkies from Edinburgh spiral through a series of adventures that left their friendship in tatters. And now the entire cast is back, as are director Danny Boyle, writer John Hodge and novelist Irvine Welsh. Since the characters have aged into middle-aged men now, the film has a very different kind of energy to it, mixing the visceral imagery with a knowing sense of nostalgia. And once again, it has a lot to say about the state of the world.

It's been two decades since Renton (Ewan McGregor) betrayed his mates. He's living in Amsterdam when a health scare forces him to think about heading back to Scotland to face the music. Spud (Ewen Bremner) hasn't held a grudge for one very good reason, but he's still a junkie and has been alienated from his wife (Shirley Henderson) and son. Simon (Jonny Lee Miller), aka Sick Boy, is furious but soon gets over it as he realises that maybe Renton can help him and his hooker cohort Veronika (Anjela Nedyalkova) finally open a brothel. On the other hand, the hotheaded Begbie (Robert Carlyle) won't be quite so forgiving. He has just escaped from prison, and his first thought is how to get even with Renton.

Hodge's script digs into the idea that these men have seen their hopes and dreams fade away, even though there's still a glimmer of desire left. And Boyle directs the film with the same spark of energy, spiralling through colourful cutaways, hilarious sight gags, wacky antics and pulsing music. It's an intriguingly grown-up variation on the first movie, and it still engulfs the audience with its sights, sounds and emotions. These are men who believe that their wasted youth has led them into an equally wasted adulthood. And there isn't much time left to make something of themselves.

Continue reading: T2 Trainspotting Review

T2 Trainspotting Trailer


Set 20 years after the original movie, we see our favourite once drug-addled Scotsman reunited. After Renton pledged to make his life better and stop taking heroin, he ran off with the takings of the groups drug-deal and had not been seen by any of the group since.  Troublemaker Begbie is still on the wrong side of the law and finds his temper taking control and constantly getting him into trouble, once he's released from jail, causing mayhem comes as standard for the moustachioed brute.

Spud has changed the least but he's still the most genuine member of the group. Sickboy finds himself running a pub a failing pub which he tries to modernise. In a bid to make money, Sickboy finds himself becoming entwined with various shady characters looking to make money by legal and illegal means. 

While most of the group have found themselves cutting their intake of heroin, that doesn't mean that they're on the straight and narrow. Each one is still battling various demons from their past and make a living example of the old adage 'old habits die hard'. 

Continue: T2 Trainspotting Trailer

Urban Hymn Trailer


Jamie and Leanne are the best of friends and the two girls find themselves constantly being caught up in trouble including the London riots which saw hundreds of police try and stop the chaos happening in the city. Neither have anyone to rely on and their lives have offered them little in the way of love and affection all these things makes their bond of friendship that much stronger.

Both the teenage girls live in a group home called Alpha House which homes some of society's most at risk kids. Jamie finds herself taken on by a new case worker who's called Kate; the in-house worker has a caring heart and reads about how Jamie lost her mother to a heroin overdose. 

One day as Kate's walking the halls, she heard Jamie singing to herself in her bedroom, Kate encourages Jamie by telling her about her good vocal skills but the conversation is soon cut short of Leanne and her continually snappy demeanor.

Continue: Urban Hymn Trailer

Bridget Jones's Baby Review

Excellent

As it's been 12 years since the last Bridget Jones movie, expectations aren't too high for this sequel. So it's a very nice surprise that this film stands on its own as a charming and often very funny romantic comedy while rounding off the trilogy in style. The cast is terrific, and the script bristles with snappy dialogue and witty characters that lead the audience down an unpredictable route to a complicated happy ending.

On her 43rd birthday, Bridget (Renee Zellweger) is finally content with her single life. Although her romantic past continues to torment her, especially when she runs into former flame Mark Darcy (Colin Firth) at a funeral. With a corporate shake-up underway at the TV news programme she produces, presenter Miranda (Sara Solemani) suggests that Bridget needs some sex to liven up her life, whisking her off to a music festival. There she has a cute, hot encounter with the dishy Jack (Patrick Dempsey). And a week later, she rekindles her romance with Mark when she learns that his marriage has ended. So when she discovers that she's pregnant, Bridget hasn't a clue which man is the father.

This premise offers plenty of scope for both thematic meaning and awkward plot turns, and the screenplay merrily dives right into all of it, mixing some silly slapstick with darker emotions as director Sharon Maguire maintains a breezy-comical tone. This kind of balance is difficult to get right, but the film feels effortlessly engaging.

Continue reading: Bridget Jones's Baby Review

Bridget Jones's Baby Trailer


Bridget has always known how to get herself into a muddle - catastrophic muddles at that - even though she's been separated from her last love, Mark, for five years it appears their journey together hasn't come to an end as yet. 

After taking advice from one of her colleagues, Bridget decides that it's time to get back on the dating scene and after deciding that the likes of Tinder aren't for her, Bridget finds herself being set up with Jack Qwant who she sees in the news room studio. 

The pair get on remarkably well and soon find themselves spending the night together. A little fun is just what Bridget needed. When she finds herself at the christening of one of her friends little girls, her and Mark are forced to be amicable towards one another but the pair fall into old habits and Bridget and he also spend the night together. 

Continue: Bridget Jones's Baby Trailer

Tale Of Tales Trailer


Happily ever after wasn't always the way fairy tales turned out. Sometimes Princesses, Kings, Queens and their pretenders need to be careful what they wish for. The Queen of Longtrellis, The King of Highhills and The King of Strongcliff are three such people who would do anything to make their biggest dreams come true.

For the Queen of Longtrellis, all she's ever wanted is a child of her own but the king and queen haven't been able to conceive. Not willing to wait any longer, the queen consults a sorcerer who is able to grant the Queens wish at any price the enchanter wishes.

The King of Highhills was never blessed with a son, his daughter is his only living heir and invites his citizens to take part in a challenge to win the hand of his daughter. When a brute of a ogre wins his challenge, the princess is given away and begins a lonesome life with him in the mountains. However, despite the ogre abusing the slight girl, as each day passes, she becomes stronger and bides her time before the day that she can become the leader her Kingdom needs.

Continue: Tale Of Tales Trailer

Shirley Henderson - The Arqiva British Academy Television Awards 2014 (BAFTA) - Arrivals - London, United Kingdom - Sunday 18th May 2014

Shirley Henderson

Shirley Henderson - The Arqiva British Academy Television Awards - Afterparty held at The Grosvenor House hotel - London, United Kingdom - Sunday 18th May 2014

Shirley Henderson

Shirley Henderson - Moet British Independent Film Awards held at Old Billingsgate Market - Arrivals - London, United Kingdom - Sunday 8th December 2013

Shirley Henderson

Meek's Cutoff Review


Excellent
Reichardt turns her focus on the old West with this evocative drama based on true events. Not only are the characters almost outrageously authentic, but the depiction of the Western frontier is more detailed than we've ever seen.

In the Oregon territory in 1845, three couples are travelling through the unmapped wilderness with their guide Meek (Greenwood), a woolly veteran with an endless stream of colourful stories. Emily (Williams) is more open-minded than her husband (Patton), the group's natural leader. The pregnant Glory (Henderson) is tending to both her husband (Huff) and their pre-teen son (Nelson). And young Thomas (Dano) is trying to assure his wife fearful Millie (Kazan). When they encounter an Indian (Rondeaux), everyone disagrees about whether or not to trust him.

Continue reading: Meek's Cutoff Review

Life During Wartime Review


Excellent
Solondz takes a sideways approach to this sequel to his 1998 hit Happiness.

With an all-new cast, it feels almost like a jazz riff, playing with the characters and themes and sending them in new directions. And it's both hilarious and clever.

When she realises that her husband (Williams) hasn't overcome his urge to make obscene phone calls, Joy (Henderson) heads to Florida to see her sister Trish (Janney), who has told everyone that her husband Bill (Hinds) has died. But he's actually in prison for abusing a young boy. Trish is now seeing a nice Jewish man (Lerner) and being a bit too honest with her son Timmy (Snyder).

Continue reading: Life During Wartime Review

Miss Pettigrew Lives For A Day Review


Good
Some film types die out because audiences no longer support them. Others disappear because no one has the talent or skill to successfully resurrect them. The witty, wacky screwball comedies of the '30s and '40s were really nothing more than cultural clashes, the weird and eccentric meshing with the calm and conservative for some humor based class/gender warfare. The new film Miss Pettigrew Lives for a Day harkens back to those days of ditzy heiresses, silly playboys, and suave leading men. And for the most part, it succeeds.

For Miss Pettigrew (Frances McDormand), London before the war is a cruel and heartless place. Fired from her most recent governess job, she's homeless and penniless. Without a single prospect in sight, her life looks fairly bleak indeed. An overheard referral at an employment agency has her rushing off to the apartment of American actress Delysia Lafosse (Amy Adams). When Miss Pettigrew inadvertently helps the bubble headed girl balance the three men in her life -- nightclub owner Nick (Mark Strong), novice producer Phil (Tom Payne), and sensitive pianist Michael (Lee Pace) -- she's hired as a social secretary. Desperate for a part in a West End musical, Delysia will stop at nothing to get her way. During her adventures, Miss Pettigrew meets noted designer Edythe Dubarry (Shirley Henderson). A shared secret between the two will have our heroine trying to patch things up with the fashion maven's boyfriend (Ciaran Hinds) before the day is over.

Continue reading: Miss Pettigrew Lives For A Day Review

Marie Antoinette Review


Very Good
The word "soft" summarizes the world of Sofia Coppola, perfectly. Each film she has made has the tenderness, vagueness and, ultimately, the sensibility of a fluffy, white cloud in the middle of a blue sky. With two near-perfect films on her resume, 1999's The Virgin Suicides and 2003's majestic Lost in Translation, Sofia Coppola's third film should have been an easy play. Instead, we are given the beguiling Marie Antoinette.

There's the famous Marie-Antoinette (Kirsten Dunst): the one who so insipidly said "Let them eat cake" when learning of the famine and starvation of the French people and the one who had her head cut off and displayed, with ample delight, to the same people she told to eat said cake. Then there's the private Marie Antoinette: the one who was forced into a French marriage (she was Austrian originally) by her brutish mother and who would eventually lose a newborn baby right as her kingdom was crashing down. Coppola seems very confused as to whom she wants to show in Marie Antoinette.

Continue reading: Marie Antoinette Review

Marie Antoinette Review


Very Good
The word "soft" summarizes the world of Sofia Coppola, perfectly. Each film she has made has the tenderness, vagueness and, ultimately, the sensibility of a fluffy, white cloud in the middle of a blue sky. With two near-perfect films on her resume, 1999's The Virgin Suicides and 2003's majestic Lost in Translation, Sofia Coppola's third film should have been an easy play. Instead, we are given the beguiling Marie Antoinette.

There's the famous Marie-Antoinette (Kirsten Dunst): the one who so insipidly said "Let them eat cake" when learning of the famine and starvation of the French people and the one who had her head cut off and displayed, with ample delight, to the same people she told to eat said cake. Then there's the private Marie Antoinette: the one who was forced into a French marriage (she was Austrian originally) by her brutish mother and who would eventually lose a newborn baby right as her kingdom was crashing down. Coppola seems very confused as to whom she wants to show in Marie Antoinette.

Continue reading: Marie Antoinette Review

Wilbur Review


Very Good
Wilbur is about suicide, but at the same time, it's nothing about suicide. Sure, the title character (newcomer Jamie Sives) hangs himself, slits his wrists and, in the movie's first scene, floods his apartment with gas and waits to die. The movie focuses on the power of family bonds and finding oneself. Suicide is treated as a starting point to a movie with a quiet emotional power and depth that lasts long after the plot problems pass and inconsistencies fade.

To prevent further incidents, Wilbur's kindly older brother, Harper (Adrian Rawlins), takes Wilbur in. Harper runs (and lives) in his late father's old Glasgow bookstore. Business is not good. There appear to be just two steady customers: An old man hungry for anything by Kipling, and a pale, whisper-quiet woman named Alice (a very good Shirley Henderson) who trades the books she finds at her depressing hospital job for quick cash.

Continue reading: Wilbur Review

Close Your Eyes Review


OK
Michael Strother's more than just a hypnotherapist, he's also a psychic! And when you hypnotize a police detective who's trying to quit smoking and start seeing her cases in your mind, well, it's big trouble for our hero!

Goran Visnjic's Michael is a troubled soul, having moved from Europe to America and back again in hopes of escaping whatever demons come along with his strange powers. Too bad he keeps flapping his gums about children floating in bodies of water and so on -- obviously the curiosity of those who he prophesying for get a little curious. And so it comes that a detective (Shirley Henderson, not really cut out for this part) blackmails Michael into helping her out on a kidnapping case -- the young girl escaped her tormentors but she hasn't spoken since. Enter the mind reader to get to the bottom of things.

Continue reading: Close Your Eyes Review

Bridget Jones: The Edge Of Reason Review


OK
In the last three years, Renée Zellweger has lost all 25 pounds of her Bridget Jones weight, vamped her way through Chicago, chunked up again for Cold Mountain, waifed away for Down with Love, and -- finally -- put all that weight back on for her long-awaited return to the role of an insecure Brit -- one which she swore she'd never perform again.

Well, throw enough money at something and it's bound to change people's minds. In fact, that seems to be the operating assumption for the entirety of this sequel, Bridget Jones: The Edge of Reason, a lackluster follow-up to the mildly enchanting original.

Continue reading: Bridget Jones: The Edge Of Reason Review

Wonderland (2000) Review


OK
The city of London has a million stories, and Wonderland tells just one of them -- well, okay, three. No, five -- five! Six -- eight -- all right, eleven subplots competing for screen time.

At the center are three sisters lookin' for a little love and compassion. Perky Soho waitress Nadia (Gina McKee, Croupier), her hair punked out in cute rabbit ears, indulges in the lonely hearts club of personal ads for Mr. Right, or at least a decent lay. Abrasive, no-nonsense hairdresser Debbie (Shirley Henderson, Topsy-Turvy) settles into a tract of not taking shit from anyone, especially her irresponsible ex, Dan (Ian Hart, Spring Forward). He can barely be counted on for weekend visits to their teenage son (Peter Marfleet). Molly (Molly Parker, Waking the Dead) is very pregnant and needs a little support from her friends, especially when her husband (John Simm) goes through a mid-life career meltdown.

Continue reading: Wonderland (2000) Review

Harry Potter And The Chamber Of Secrets Review


Good

Welcome back, Potter.

The beloved Harry Potter returns to screens, a scant year after his most debut, with the film version of book two in the unfathomably popular Harry Potter series, Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets. Unfortunately, while the Potter-obsessed will likely find few faults with the film, this sequel captures much less of the original's magic. (And while I've not read the books, I understand the same can be said for the second novel as well.)

Secrets finds Harry (Daniel Radcliffe) back at home with his Muggle family on summer vacation, locked in his room (though no longer under the stairs). Before long, Harry is set to return to Hogwarts -- despite the insistence from his uncle that he is no longer allowed to study magic. But a daring prison break, courtesy of the Weasley family -- including Harry's best bud Ron (Rupert Grint), gets Harry back to school, despite the meddling of a Yoda-like "house elf" named Dobby (very obvious CG). The masochistic Dobby tries to convince Harry that his life is in danger if he returns to Hogwarts -- though in reality his life appears more in danger due to Dobby's "helpful" meddling.

Harry of course does return to Hogwarts, where all his familiar experiences await him. Hermione (Emma Watson) is still the class brain. Hagrid (Robbie Coltrane) is still the school clown. Snape (Alan Rickman) is still Snape. The new additions to the cast include a new Dark Arts professor, Gilderoy Lockhart (Kenneth Branagh), a narcissistic wizard with questionable ability, as well as the father of Harry's platinum blonde archrival Malfoy, Lucius (Jason Isaacs).

While the cast is still in fine form (the exception being a shockingly haggard Richard Harris as headmaster Dumbledore; Harris died a few weeks before the film's release), it's the story that is decidedly lacking in this episode. The titular Chamber of Secrets is a legendary room inside Hogwarts fabled to hold a menacing creature. It can only be opened, we're told, by an heir to the Slytherin family. When a mysterious message appears on the Hogwarts walls in blood, Harry begins hearing hissing voices, and students begin to turn up paralyzed. It appears the Chamber of Secrets has been opened -- and suspicions fall on Draco Malfoy (Tom Felton) as the heir. Or is it Harry?

What follows is another nearly-three hours of exposition as Harry, Ron, and Hermione attempt to crack this riddle, Nancy Drew-style, while the body count at Hogwarts keeps rising. Mercilessly padded, the movie drags us through ages of all-too-familiar territory: a Quidditch match ends predictably; spells go awry; the trio works on a potion together; one-note characters appear only to say their line and soon exit the story. Finally, invariably first-on-the-scene Harry coincidentally discovers a blank diary -- it's amazing how much coincidence drives the plot -- that leads him on a circuitous path to discover the Chamber, just in time for a final showdown with what looks astonishingly like a miniature-golf hazard.

Jeez, I'm bored just writing about it. So much of Secrets is so unnecessary that my audience was way ahead of the circuitous yet ultimately very simplistic story. Kids spent the three hours running up and down the aisles -- only their parents had the fortitude to stay with the plot. That said, this installment is much funnier than the original, and it has a bit more of a grown-up sentiment to it. Still, it's going to take more than an ominous voice in the walls and a flying car to keep even the most patient adults interested in a three-hour movie.

Chamber of Secrets is enjoyable for many of its stretches, and it's unfortunate that director Chris Columbus (giving up the reins for episode 3) didn't take more chances with the source material, excising the many irrelevant parts and adding in a bit of his own vision. As such, we have a movie that plays out in fits and starts of fun alternating with boredom. Sad to say, the kids will probably want to leave midway through this one and ask you to replay the original on DVD when you get home. Poor Harry, when we see you again (in two years' time), I hope you'll have regained a bit of your magic.

As with Potter #1, the film comes to DVD in an exhaustive and impressive two-disc package, headlined by one of the most aggressive 6.1 channel audio tracks I've ever had the privilege to hear on DVD. This film thankfully makes it much easier to find the deleted/extended scenes, all of which are well worth checking out and add a bit of depth and flavor to an otherwise so-so movie. There are also tons of games for the kids and a few interviews for the adults, including one with J.K. Rowling.

Try putting right down the middle of the course.

Intermission Review


Very Good
Intermission, a gritty ensemble comedy about a bunch of gritty Irish folk, bears some resemblance to late-nineties indie crimedies like Trainspotting, Go, and Lock, Stock & Two Smoking Barrels, and fans of those movies should certainly check this one out--it's practically made for those "if you liked [that], check out [this]" shelves at the video store.

What Intermission resembles just as handily, though, is an Irish Love Actually, which is to say it's like Love Actually with a lot more drinking and violence. This is unlikely to placate anyone who truly hated Love Actually and, as such, would require something on the order of a soccer riot to feel fully cleansed. But if you (like me) merely thought a few of those charmingly stammering Englishmen could use a good deck, Intermission is the punch-throwing, rock-chucking romantic comedy for you.

Continue reading: Intermission Review

Topsy-Turvy Review


Good
One of my earliest childhood remembrances was watching a performance of H.M.S. Pinafore. I thought it was really neat. The costumes and music were amazing and even though I couldn't understand all of what was going on, I was fascinated by how all of these people worked together.

Now 20 years later, while watching another Gilbert and Sullivan performance (of sorts) I am still thinking the same things.

Continue reading: Topsy-Turvy Review

Yes Review


Weak
I usually give Sally Potter a lot of slack; I've enjoyedall three of her feature films so far ("Orlando," "The TangoLesson" and "TheMan Who Cried"), even if I've been alonein doing so. She's an intelligent and sensitive filmmaker who usually establishesbreathing room for her deeply felt characters.

However her latest film, "Yes," is a failed experiment.Joan Allen plays an Irish-born woman stuck in a loveless, childless marriageto a philandering husband (Sam Neill). She meets a Lebanese cook (SimonAbkarian) who was once a surgeon in Beirut, and begins a love affair. Writtenentirely in verse, "Yes" requires the actors to suffer throughlong passages of blathering talk, and the scenes routinely dry out longbefore they end.

Potter attempts to add layers to the film by hinting atpolitical paranoia and showing scenes through surveillance cameras, butthe verse angle nullifies these attempts. The superb Allen is capable ofextremes: from icy control to dropping her emotional guard, yet she cannotmake this film's rhythms work.

Shirley Henderson, playing a maid who observes the actionand breaks the fourth wall by speaking directly to the camera, shows justhow the film might have played. With her silky, slithering delivery, sheplays with the words like a snake might toy with a mouse.

Harry Potter & The Chamber Of Secrets Review


Good

In his second big-screen outing, adolescent wizard Harry Potter is blessed with enough cinematic magic to overcome several of the very same problems that left last year's "Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone" feeling a little protracted and rambling.

Sure "Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets" spends twice as much screen time on atmosphere and adventure scenes than on plot and character. But this time around every episode seems relevant, which is a vast improvement over last year's film, bloated as it was with Quidditch matches and monster moments that didn't advance the plot one iota.

Returning director Chris Columbus retains the enchanted ambiance as Harry heads to Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry for his second year of instruction in the black arts. But nothing is ever easy for our young hero, as unseen forces seem to be conspiring against him -- not the least of which is some kind of elusive beast that's loose in Hogwarts' halls, turning students to stone.

Continue reading: Harry Potter & The Chamber Of Secrets Review

Shirley Henderson

Shirley Henderson Quick Links

News Pictures Video Film RSS
Advertisement

Occupation

Actor


Shirley Henderson Movies

On the Road Movie Review

On the Road Movie Review

Wolf Alice fans are likely to be rather disappointed by this hybrid documentary-drama about the...

Okja Movie Review

Okja Movie Review

As Tilda Swinton reteams with her Snowpiercer director, Korea's Bong Joon Ho, it's perhaps unsurprising...

T2 Trainspotting Movie Review

T2 Trainspotting Movie Review

It's been 20 years since we last saw four freewheeling young junkies from Edinburgh spiral...

T2 Trainspotting Trailer

T2 Trainspotting Trailer

Set 20 years after the original movie, we see our favourite once drug-addled Scotsman reunited....

Urban Hymn Trailer

Urban Hymn Trailer

Jamie and Leanne are the best of friends and the two girls find themselves constantly...

Bridget Jones's Baby Movie Review

Bridget Jones's Baby Movie Review

As it's been 12 years since the last Bridget Jones movie, expectations aren't too high...

Bridget Jones's Baby Trailer

Bridget Jones's Baby Trailer

Bridget has always known how to get herself into a muddle - catastrophic muddles at...

Tale Of Tales Trailer

Tale Of Tales Trailer

Happily ever after wasn't always the way fairy tales turned out. Sometimes Princesses, Kings, Queens...

Set Fire To The Stars Trailer

Set Fire To The Stars Trailer

New York - the 1950s. A young and aspiring American poet, John Malcolm Brinnin (Elijah...

In Secret Movie Review

In Secret Movie Review

Filmmaker Charlie Stratton takes a rather obvious approach to Emile Zola's iconic 1867 novel Therese...

In Secret Trailer

In Secret Trailer

Therese Raquin is a young woman living with her aunt and cousin Camille. One day...

Filth Movie Review

Filth Movie Review

As another full-on Irvine Welsh adaptation Trainspotting did in 1996, this bracingly original movie puts...

Filth Trailer

Filth Trailer

This trailer is only suitable for persons aged 18 or over.Bruce Robertson is a vile,...

Everyday Movie Review

Everyday Movie Review

An impressive cinematic experiment, this film is worth seeing for its big concept and documentary...

Artists
Actors
    Filmmakers
      Artists
      Bands
        Musicians
          Artists
          Celebrities
             
              Artists
              Interviews
                musicians & bands in the news
                  actors & filmmakers in the news
                    celebrities in the news

                      Go Back in Time using our News archive to see what happened on a particular day in the past.