Shima Iwashita

Shima Iwashita

Shima Iwashita Quick Links

Film RSS

An Autumn Afternoon Review


Essential
Waking up, going to work, having a drink with co-workers, and visiting with friends make up the mundane stories that family members have to suffer through when you finally arrive home. Although these events hardly carry a dinner conversation, Japanese director Yasujiro Ozu turned those everyday happenings into a film career. An Autumn Afternoon's plot, like many of his 50-plus films (this was his last), centers on a father growing old and marrying his daughter off. Just when the variation on a theme may grow old, Ozu proves that it's not what you say; it's how you say it that makes the difference.

Japanese salaryman Shuhei Hirayama's life is changing. One of his admired childhood professors now runs a noodle shop, his friends are growing older -- marrying off their children and taking new wives -- and he's realized that he can't keep his daughter trapped as the household caretaker. So Hirayama sets off to find a suitor for his daughter in the old tradition of arranged marriage. Although this dilemma drives the majority of Ozu's later work, it's Hirayamam's reaction to the change that thrills Ozu fans. Whereas the marriage of a widower's daughter is met with uncertainty, fear, and sadness in Late Spring and The End of Summer, Autumn Afternoon's Hirayama almost effortlessly supports his daughter's marriage, despite his impending loneliness. It's those subtle tonal shifts within Ozu's work that shows the evolution of Japanese life and culture -- one that goes beyond culture and strikes at the very core of family and relationships that we all can relate to.

Continue reading: An Autumn Afternoon Review

The Demon Review


Excellent
One of the great things about writing about movies is the ongoing realization that, no matter how deep you delve, there always remain revelations to be made. There are a number of heroic distributors who make their money proving it, among them Chicago's Home Vision Entertainment; a pair of recent DVD releases of films by Japanese director Yoshitaro Nomura are the latest example of fascinating offerings to be shepherded by HVE from relative obscurity to a conveniently nearby video store.

Like its companion release Zero Focus, what registers first about 1978's The Demon is its Hitchcockian air. Based on a story by Seicho Matsumoto, the best-selling Japanese mystery writer of his day, The Demon tracks the domestic horrors that befall three young children whose mother abandons them to their father's care. I use "abandon" because the father is not ideally positioned to care for them: he's married, and the mother of these children is not the wife. What's more, his wife has no inkling of the children's existence until the very day they're dumped at the small printing shop the couple runs. You might say that she does not react gracefully. Still, the demon of the title is not this resentful and cruel woman, nor a supernatural force of any kind - nothing happens in The Demon that science can't explain. Rather, this demon is the father himself. The tragedy and horror of the film reside not only in the acts this man commits, but in the way director Nomura ensures that the audience understands - maybe even, to a small extent, sympathizes with - the psychic terror this demon experiences at the thought of what he's done.

Continue reading: The Demon Review

Shima Iwashita

Shima Iwashita Quick Links

Film RSS
Advertisement

Occupation

Actor


Suggested

Relive Kate Bush's 2014 Live Show With 'Before The Dawn'

Relive Kate Bush's 2014 Live Show With 'Before The Dawn'

The live album is set for released in November.

Benedict Cumberbatch Joins David Gilmour Onstage For 'Comfortably Numb'

Benedict Cumberbatch Joins David Gilmour Onstage For 'Comfortably Numb'

The 'Sherlock' and 'Doctor Strange' star joined Gilmour onstage at the Royal Albert Hall for a rendition of the Pink Floyd classic.

Advertisement
Chapter Three Of 'American Horror Story: Roanoke' Explains The Story Behind The Haunting (Spoilers)

Chapter Three Of 'American Horror Story: Roanoke' Explains The Story Behind The Haunting (Spoilers)

Time to learn what Kathy Bates' character has to do with all of this.

Advertisement

Shima Iwashita Movies

Artists
Actors
    Filmmakers
      Artists
      Bands
        Musicians
          Artists
          Celebrities
             
              Artists
              Interviews
                musicians & bands in the news
                  actors & filmmakers in the news
                    celebrities in the news

                      Go Back in Time using our News archive to see what happened on a particular day in the past.