Shawnee Smith

Shawnee Smith

Shawnee Smith Quick Links

News Pictures Video Film Quotes RSS

Grace Unplugged Trailer


Grace Trey is a young singer/songwriter desperate to follow in her musician father's footsteps and gain attention with a Billboard hit. Her career so far has been singing alongside him in a Christian band at her local church but as tensions rise between the two of them over their artistic differences, Grace makes the big decision to run away to Los Angeles as her father's former manager Mossy agrees to help her land a record deal. However, life on the way to stardom is not all the glamour and fun that she thought it would be. She soon begins to realise the shallowness in everybody around her, from her make-up artist to the young male TV star who has suddenly taken an interest in her. As she starts to move further and further away from her faith and her father handles her disappearance badly, the only solace she finds is in an intern named Quentin who tries to remind her of the important things she's left behind.

Continue: Grace Unplugged Trailer

FXX Network Launch Party

Shawnee Smith - FXX Network Launch Party And Premieres For "It's Always Sunny In Philadelphia" And "The League" Held at Lure - Hollywood, CA, United States - Tuesday 3rd September 2013

Shawnee Smith
Shawnee Smith
Shawnee Smith
Shawnee Smith

Saw III Review


OK
The Saw series, like most horror franchises, uses a lot of constants in its formula -- even when those constants don't seem particularly vital to the quality of the series. Saw III, for example, matches its predecessors in the dubious categories of histrionic yelling, equally histrionic smash-editing (often incorporating a generous helping of re-used footage, from the previous films or even from earlier in this one), and plot twists that depend on those histrionics to drown out implausibility.

But Saw III does actually have a plot to twist which, like its predecessors, sets it apart from most slasher films. When we last left Jigsaw (Tobin Bell, the only cast member who doesn't have to scream half his dialogue), he was dying, and taking young Amanda (Shawnee Smith) under his wing to continue his work. Saw III picks up with Jigsaw in even worse shape than before, his body breaking down while his moralizing creepiness remains more or less intact. Amanda brings in an unhappy doctor (Bahar Soomekh) to keep Jigsaw alive along enough to see one of his most elaborate games played all the way through.

Continue reading: Saw III Review

Saw III Review


OK
The Saw series, like most horror franchises, uses a lot of constants in its formula -- even when those constants don't seem particularly vital to the quality of the series. Saw III, for example, matches its predecessors in the dubious categories of histrionic yelling, equally histrionic smash-editing (often incorporating a generous helping of re-used footage, from the previous films or even from earlier in this one), and plot twists that depend on those histrionics to drown out implausibility.

But Saw III does actually have a plot to twist which, like its predecessors, sets it apart from most slasher films. When we last left Jigsaw (Tobin Bell, the only cast member who doesn't have to scream half his dialogue), he was dying, and taking young Amanda (Shawnee Smith) under his wing to continue his work. Saw III picks up with Jigsaw in even worse shape than before, his body breaking down while his moralizing creepiness remains more or less intact. Amanda brings in an unhappy doctor (Bahar Soomekh) to keep Jigsaw alive along enough to see one of his most elaborate games played all the way through.

Continue reading: Saw III Review

Saw II Review


Unbearable
When I was living in New York, I had the misfortune of spending a better part of one night in Penn Station. Tired of wandering, I wound up in the men's room around 3:45 AM and was greeted by quite a sight: a homeless man bathing in the sink, another making dreadful noises in a toilet stall, and a janitor sweeping up God know what off the yellow tiled floor. The janitor was smoking and the bathing homeless man asked him for a drag. The janitor requested that the homeless man to show him his teeth and the homeless guy obliged, presenting a sore mouth with maybe two or three black and yellow teeth jutting from obscenely swollen gums. The janitor said, "Alright," shrugged, and then let the guy take a drag of his smoke. After the guy with the rotting mouth took a nice long drag, the janitor took back the cigarette and smoked the rest of it.

Saw II made me feel like I was watching that same thing for 90 odd minutes. It's a picture as revolting as it is needless.

Continue reading: Saw II Review

Summer School Review


Good
Summer School may not teach us much about life and love, but if there was any justice in the world we'd be seeing reruns of this on TNT every Sunday instead of endless repeats of Sixteen Candles and its ilk.

Summer School is a lame and obvious stunt piece, but damn if it doesn't know it. Mark Harmon's a lazy teacher stuck with the worst students in school for summer classes. Eventually he's tasked with getting them to pass The Big Test, only to find that they're completely unmotivated and that one of them is totally illiterate. In fact, his job is on the line if they fail. What happens next is probably familiar to anyone who went to high school in America: The students bargain with the teacher; they'll try hard if he lets them use his car, throw a party in his house, and so on.

Continue reading: Summer School Review

A Slipping-Down Life Review


OK
In the kind of town people tend to think of leaving, a timid young woman leading a monotonous life suddenly flips into a mode of uncharacteristic spontaneity when she discovers a local honky-tonk singer with an attitude that rings her bell.

Evie Decker (Lili Taylor) lives with her sedentary and semi-senile father (Tom Bower) in a modest house on an uneventful street (shot around Austin, Texas) and works in a demeaning job at a rundown amusement park. Her moment of magic comes when, on a radio interview, the voice of struggling musician Drumstrings Casey (the cheeky faced Guy Pearce) says things that the interviewer has no possibility of relating to but with which Evie is in perfect harmony. He has plucked the right chord on her heartstrings and she wastes no time getting down to see him perform at the roadhouse with her closest friend, Violet (Sara Rue).

Continue reading: A Slipping-Down Life Review

The Island Review


Grim
Director Michael Bay ("The Rock," "Armageddon,""PearlHarbor") has become the poster boy foreverything that's wrong with blockbuster summer movies. As long as hisout-sized action fare has expensive explosions, quick-cut chase sceneswith spectacular crashes, a few commercial-quotable one-liners, one veryhot chick, and several low-angle, slow-motion dolly shots that endlesslycircle his heroes, he apparently couldn't care about much else.

In "The Island," the chase scene is on a hoveringrocket-cycle, the hot chick is heart-stopping Scarlett Johansson (hopefullyjust taking a break from brainier fare like ), the dizzying hero shotsare of Ewan McGregor, and the plot -- what there is of it -- is about thepair of them discovering they are clones bred as spare parts for rich people.

Born full-sized, implanted with false memories of a world-widecatastrophe, and living in hope of being selected to leave their enclosed,concrete-and-glass colony for The Island, "nature's last remainingpathogen-free zone," the population of DNA duplicates are kept clueless,sexless and surrounded by product placement (they wear Puma track suits,drink Aquafina water and work on Apple computers). But Lincoln Six-Echo(McGregor) has a defect: He's curious.

The potential for mixing social commentary into the sci-fiadventure hangs from the film like a ripe fruit that goes unplucked byBay -- although he seems to think he's tapping into deeper themes by exposingLincoln to what really happens to his Island-bound friends (they're killedfor their organs). Lincoln then breaks out of the facility (the securityis insultingly inept) with its next victim, Jordan Two-Delta (Johansson),a girl for whom he has funny forbidden feelings.

Continue reading: The Island Review

SAW Review


OK

Sclock-horror maestro Roger Corman constantly reminded his writers of the vital importance of the first ten minutes of a film. That's when you capture the audience and set the tone for the entire film. Many filmmakers waste time with a useless montage or shots of a cityscape, etc. With the new horror film "Saw," we start exactly when the characters do: we suddenly wake up in a bathtub full of water in a dark room with no memory of how we got there. It's literally a birth into a new and uncertain world.

Two other recent films started this way, "Cube" and "Dark City," and both have become cult classics. "Saw" may be destined for the same.

First-time writer/director James Wan and co-writer/actor Leigh Whannell unfold their story slowly, giving information only as it's required -- or when it's unexpected. Adam (Whannell) climbs out of the bathtub and takes in his surroundings. It's a disgusting industrial bathroom with lots of huge pipes winding all over the walls and ceiling. He has no shoes on and his ankle is locked and chained to one of the pipes. A man lies in a pool of blood in the middle of the floor, a gun in one hand and a tape recorder in the other. A third man, a live one, Dr. Lawrence Gordon (Cary Elwes) is chained to the opposite side of the room.

Continue reading: SAW Review

A Slipping Down Life Review


Weak

Toni Kalem's "A Slipping Down Life" has been sitting on the shelf since 1999, and it's not hard to see why. Based on Anne Tyler's novel, it tells the story of Evie Decker (Lili Taylor), an introverted small-town girl who becomes fascinated with a Jim Morrison-like singer/songwriter, Drumstrings Casey (Guy Pearce).

While the rest of Casey's audience grows impatient with his impromptu on-stage poetic babblings, Evie feels she understands him and carves his name on her forehead -- backwards so that she can read it in the mirror. Because of her stunt, she gets to meet her idol and forms a strange relationship with him.

"A Slipping Down Life" awkwardly straddles realism and dream imagery, but neither works very well. Evie is so shy and quiet that she appears psychologically damaged, and she is so incompatible with her two best friends (Shawnee Smith and Sara Rue) that you spend the film wondering why they would ever hang out together.

Continue reading: A Slipping Down Life Review

Shawnee Smith

Shawnee Smith Quick Links

News Pictures Video Film Quotes RSS