Sergio Castellitto

Sergio Castellitto

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Twice Born Trailer


When Gemma was a young student from Italy, all she wanted was excitement and adventure in her life. She travels to the Bosnian city of Sarajevo where she meets a handsome American stranger called Diego with whom she begins a wildly passionate love affair. Diego is desperate to have children, while Gemma finds herself wishing for a child just like him, but their relationship is tested by a prolonged fertility struggle. When she finally manages to conceive, they face mortal danger when the Balkan war arrives in the city. Gemma and her newly born son Pietro are forced to retreat back to Italy, while Diego remains in Bosnia and subsequently loses his life. Now a teenager, Pietro must learn about what happened with his father as the mother and son return to that fateful city. However, they soon find themselves uncovering some disturbing secrets.

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Video - Penelope Cruz Is Kissed By 'Venuto Al Mondo' Director At Rome Photocall


'Vicky Cristina Barcelona' star Penelope Cruz poses during a photocall in Rome to promote her latest movie 'Venuto al Mondo'. She is snapped alongside the director and writer Sergio Castellitto, stars Saadet Aksoy, Adnan Haskovic and Pietro Castellitto, and the author of the original novel Margaret Mazzantini.

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2012 Toronto International Film Festival - 'Twice Born' premiere at Roy Thomson Hall - Arrivals

Sergio Castellitto - Director Sergio Castellitto and Margaret Mazzantini Thursday 13th September 2012 2012 Toronto International Film Festival - 'Twice Born' premiere at Roy Thomson Hall - Arrivals

Sergio Castellitto

2012 Toronto International Film Festival - 'Twice Born' premiere at Roy Thomson Hall - Arrivals

Sergio Castellitto - Director Sergio Castellitto Thursday 13th September 2012 2012 Toronto International Film Festival - 'Twice Born' premiere at Roy Thomson Hall - Arrivals

2012 Toronto International Film Festival - 'Twice Born' premiere at Roy Thomson Hall - Arrivals

Penelope Cruz and Sergio Castellitto - Penelope Cruz and Director Sergio Castellitto Thursday 13th September 2012 2012 Toronto International Film Festival - 'Twice Born' premiere at Roy Thomson Hall - Arrivals

2012 Toronto International Film Festival - 'Twice Born' premiere arrival at Roy Thomson Hall.

Sergio Castellitto Thursday 13th September 2012 2012 Toronto International Film Festival - 'Twice Born' premiere arrival at Roy Thomson Hall.

2012 Toronto International Film Festival - 'Twice Born' premiere arrival at Roy Thomson Hall.

Sergio Castellitto - Pietro Castellitto, Sergio Castellitto, and Margaret Mazzantini Thursday 13th September 2012 2012 Toronto International Film Festival - 'Twice Born' premiere arrival at Roy Thomson Hall.

The Chronicles of Narnia: Prince Caspian Review


Weak
In Clerks II, uber-slacker Randal described the Lord of the Rings trilogy as a series of endless walks. Nothing but nonstop, pointless treks. One has to wonder what his reaction would be to the overwhelming ambulation in the two Chronicles of Narnia films. While The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe had origins and mythos to highlight, Disney's latest entry in the franchise, Prince Caspian, requires a more minimal setup. All returning director Andrew Adamson has to offer as a result is more shoe to footpath action, with the occasional CGI-sparked battle to break up the constant strolling.

It's been a year since Lucy (Georgie Henley), Edmund (Skandar Keynes), Peter (William Moseley), and Susan (Anna Popplewell) Pevensie have been to the magical land that they once ruled as kings and queens. However, 13 centuries have passed in Narnia, and a race of humans known as Telmarines have overrun the kingdom. They have systematically killed off almost all the creatures, and rule by blood and violence. Within the court, Miraz (Sergio Castellitto), brother of the late King Caspian IX, has taken over and threatened the life of the true, titular heir (Ben Barnes). With the help of the returning foursome, Prince Caspian will rally the remaining Narnians, leading them to victory over their evil oppressors.

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Paris, Je T'aime Review


OK
One would like to think that there at least a few other cities in the world besides Paris that could have inspired a film as varied in the types of cinematic pleasure so ably delivered by the anthology piece Paris Je T'Aime -- but it seems unlikely. This isn't due to an unavailability of good stories or locations in many other great metropolises, but more because being able to dangle the possibility of shooting in Paris in front of the world's greatest directors is going to be so much more enticing. Also, there are few other cities besides Paris that come with such a powerful and multifarious wealth of preassociated images and emotions for both filmmaker and audience to both draw upon and react against. So what could have been a collection of short films with a few highs, several lows, and a lot of muddled in-betweens is in fact a remarkably and consistently imaginative body of work, practically giddy with energy, that only rarely touches the ground.

Project overseers Emmanuel Benbihy and Tristan Carné wanted to create a cinematic map of Paris, with each short film representing one of the city's 20 arrondissements (neighborhoods). They ended up with 18 films, none of them more than a few minutes long and directed by a glittering, international roster of filmmakers. While none of the films here are anything approaching masterpieces, hardly a one is in any way a chore to sit through, which has to be some sort of an accomplishment.

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Don't Move Review


Unbearable
In the pantheon of ludicrous, offensive, and idiotic dramatic ideas, few can rival the narrative axis of Sergio Castellitto's Don't Move, in which heart-stopping romance and chest-heaving passion spring from deliberate, violent rape. Preposterous whenever it's not embarrassingly mawkish and manipulative, this Italian import concerns Timoteo (Castellitto), an unhappily married surgeon, and the budding affair he begins with filthy, impoverished cocktail waitress Italia (Penélope Cruz) after he - believe it or not - repeatedly sexually assaults her over the course of a few weeks. Yet love blossoms from such brutality because, as Castellitto's film would somehow have us believe, Timoteo's crime - not exactly romanticized, but nonetheless presented with something less than condemnation - is just a cry for help, a cathartic expulsion of the anger and anguish created by his loveless life. Thus, when he physically forces himself upon the innocent Italia (her name simply one of many instances of unsubtle symbolism), he's not a cretinous predator to be loathed or vilified but, rather, a pitiful man trying to find himself.

Turned off yet? If not, then Castellitto's wealth of ostentatious slow-motion shots, employment of cheesy pop songs, and disgusting, exploitive use of a critically wounded young girl for his film's framing story, will undoubtedly do the trick. Adapted from Margaret Mazzantini's novel, Don't Move layers on cheap sentiment and shamelessly calculating plot twists without even a sidewise glance toward rationality. Timoteo's teenage daughter suffers serious head trauma in a motorcycle accident, and while waiting to hear word of her grave condition, Timoteo spies a mysterious figure on the hospital promenade who conjures memories of his beloved Italia, whom he not only loved and planned to run away with (wife and brand new baby be damned), but whom he credits for having healed his tortured soul. As embodied by Castellitto, Timoteo is the kind of misery-relishing sad-sack who enjoys prolonged, empty stares into nothingness, and his behavior is so ridiculous - including one screamingly silly moment when he writes "I Raped A Woman" in the sand while his wife ignorantly saunters by - that it's hard to envisage him as anything less than an absurdly overblown fictional creation. Watching him act forlornly in a dreary bar (in slow-motion, naturally) while Europe's "The Final Countdown" blares from the jukebox is to witness the eye-rolling height of bizarre unintentional comedy.

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The Big Blue Review


OK
No wonder audiences didn't connect with this film, an early Luc Besson-Jean Reno collaboration that explores the mysterious world of deep deep diving. Oddly, The Big Blue is somehow a love story as well, with Rosanna Arquette and Jean-Marc Barr making goo-goo eyes between his deep dives and swims with the dolphins. The Reno-Barr rivalry (who can dive deeper) consitutes the bulk of the film, as well as its most dramatic moments, but the strange dolphin symbolism, blue-tinted photography, and self-important chest-beating will likely leave most viewers out to sea.

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The Star Maker Review


OK
Italian melodrama about a Roman charlatan who goes from town to town in Sicily, doing "screen tests" for a fee. Things turn awry and we learn - dun dun dun! - that crime just doesn't pay.

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Mostly Martha Review


Excellent
If you're like me, a sucker for a good old fashion romance and someone who shamelessly loves to eat, then Mostly Martha offers all the perfect ingredients to more than satisfy your appetite. With a succulent array of gourmet meals constantly paraded across the screen, the film teases the taste buds with humor as tender as sautéed veal and romance as flavorful as aged wine, making for a hearty but appropriately low calorie love story.

First-time director Sandra Nettlebeck introduces Martha (Martina Gedeck) as an obsessive-compulsive chef at a chic restaurant in Hamburg, Germany, with no friends, no love interest, and no life other than an unparalleled knowledge of cuisine and the ability to cook any gourmet meal to perfection. As expected from an against-all-odds love story, Martha embodies the typically cinematic diamond-in-the-rough protagonist combining talent and beauty yet faced with a fatal flaw that plunges her into misery. Touted by her boss as "the second best chef in the city," she appears haughty and overly obsessed with "cooking by the book." In fact, in all her culinary glory she forgets that despite her impressive skills, the customer is always right. It becomes clear that Martha's manic tendencies must be overcome in order for her to gain personal fulfillment.

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Va Savoir Review


Weak
Only the French could make a romantic comedy that clocks in at more than 2 1/2 hours in length. And of course, it wouldn't have much of a plot, either. This wafer-thin production, reminiscent of a really long Oscar Wilde play, Starring Jeanne Balibar (the poor man's Audrey Tautou), the movie is a hodgepodge of love triangles and petty theft, some of which amuses, but not for long enough to keep this critic's interest over its full running time. A curiosity that's easily forgettable.

Caterina In The City (In Subtitled Italian) Review


Weak
On its surface, the lightweight Italian coming-of-agedrama "Caterina in the City" falls somewhere between the nothingnessof a tweenybopper popcorn movie and the darker peer-pressure sensibilitiesof 2003's hard-biting "Thirteen."

Underneath, it's also a political satire in which middle-schoolcliques take on the veneer of fascists, communists and socialists, whilethe activist parents of these children have slipped so far into passionaterhetoric that they seem almost surreal.

Trying desperately to keep her head above water while navigatingthis sea of supercharged social mores is naive, soft-spoken, 14-year-oldCaterina (Alice Teghil), recently transplanted to sophisticated Rome froma provincial corner of the Mediterranean nation. Alternately harassed andcourted by gaggles of grungy hippie girls and partying sexpot popular types,what little self-identity she has is constantly being trampled by the strongerpersonalities of her class's queen bees.

Meanwhile, at home the poor girl's pride is helpless inthe wake of her bitter, blustery, unstable father (Sergio Catellitto),who fancies himself an underappreciated intellectual and can't wait toride his daughter's coattails into the socio-political circles of her friends'parents -- among them a government minister and a famous liberal activist.Honest and loving, but dim and meek, her mother (Margherita Buy) is nohelp either.

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Sergio Castellitto

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