Sergey Selyanov

Sergey Selyanov

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The Stoker [Kochegar] Review


Excellent

Russian filmmaker Balabanov has the ability to submerge us in his stories, cleverly blending complex characters and twisty storylines in ways that look remarkably simple. He also has a wonderfully artistic eye, and in this gently comical thriller he inventively re-creates a period barely 20 years in the past as an iconic time and place.

It's wintry St Petersburg in the 1990s, where the ageing Ivan (Skryabin) stokes the city's boiler-room fires. He's an ethnic Yakut who served with the Soviet army in Afghanistan and has been left shell-shocked by the experience. So he spends his down-time writing a novel about the appalling treatment of 19th century Yakuts in Russia. Ivan allows his old military colleague Mikhail (Mosin), who's now a gangster, to dispose of bodies in his fires. And he gives all his cash to his fashion-conscious daughter Sasha (Tumutova), who's in love with the hulking Bison (Matveyev). But she doesn't know that Bison's also having an affair with Mikhail's spoiled-brat daughter Masha (Korotayeva).

The film maintains a light tone with the help of a perky guitar score (the artist actually appears on TV at one point), while Balabanov and his cast create characters who are layered with blackly comical touches. Violence is dispensed dispassionately, and truths emerge without shocked reactions. Side characters add slightly surreal spin on things, including two young girls who watch Ivan's fire as if it's a gripping TV soap and two goons who live like they're in a gangster movie, cheating at cards and carrying a kalashnikov in a guitar case.

Continue reading: The Stoker [Kochegar] Review

Mongol Review


Excellent
While American filmmakers flog the CGI action to drunken extremes (300, Beowulf), Russian director Sergei Bodrov spits at shortcuts (although he still digs CGI) and recalls the great movie spectacles of the old school, invoking the invigorating spirits of Abel Gance, Sergei Bondarchuk, and Samuel Bronston, in his rousing, grand, and old-fashioned epic Mongol.

The first film in a trilogy, Mongol charts the course of the young nine-year-old Temudjin, beginning in 1172 on the barren and unforgiving Mongolian steppes, and his ensuing trials and tribulations after his father's murder until 1206, when the adult Temudjin (the great Tadanobu Asano) becomes the legendary Genghis Khan, uniter of the Mongolian tribes, and soon to be conqueror of the world, all set to an incredibly rich musical score by Tuomas Kantelinen.

Continue reading: Mongol Review

Schizo Review


Weak
In the wilds of Kazakhstan, circa the early '90s, there isn't exactly a lot to do and not much wealth to go around - even the head gangsters seem a pretty threadbare lot. In terms of excitement, the only going concern in these wide-open steppes is bare-knuckle boxing; you can forget about jobs. The same torpor and lack of opportunity that afflicts the Kazakhs depicted in the film Schizo also afflicts the film itself, a short piece of work that tells a minor story with little verve or insight.

The title comes from the nickname given to the protagonist, Mustafa (Olzhas Nusuppaev), a 15-year-old with unspecific mental problems whose mother isn't quite sure what to do with him. In lieu of any guiding purpose in life, Mustafa hooks up with his mother's boyfriend, Sakura (Eduard Tabyshev), a cigarette-smoking, sunglasses-wearing, motorcycle-riding shyster who helps organize the aforementioned boxing matches and uses Mustafa to round up new fighters. It's a living, of sorts, and Mustafa doesn't have a lot else to do but wander the countryside with a blank look on his face (he does that a lot). When the boxing turns out to be a little more of a blood sport than one would have imagined, Mustafa at first has misgivings, but soon gets himself in deeper than would be recommended for a schizophrenic with disassociative tendencies.

Continue reading: Schizo Review

Sergey Selyanov

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Sergey Selyanov Movies

The Stoker [Kochegar] Movie Review

The Stoker [Kochegar] Movie Review

Russian filmmaker Balabanov has the ability to submerge us in his stories, cleverly blending complex...

Mongol Movie Review

Mongol Movie Review

While American filmmakers flog the CGI action to drunken extremes (300, Beowulf), Russian director Sergei...

Schizo Movie Review

Schizo Movie Review

In the wilds of Kazakhstan, circa the early '90s, there isn't exactly a lot to...

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