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Bone Tomahawk Trailer


Life is quite sedentary in the small town of Bright Hope, the people rely on the support of Sheriff Franklin Hunt and as such he and his deputies keep things in order. When a beaten up man arrives in the town, he's soon asked many questions by the town Sheriff Hunt though is given few answers. The man who gives his name as Buddy is injured and the local doctors assistant tends to his wounds.

That night the town is attacked by unknown vigilantes and a person is murdered. When Sheriff Hunt returns to the Sheriff station he finds his deputy, the prisoner and Samantha (the doctors assistant) all missing. With few clues to work with, Hunt retrieves an arrow from the crime scene and seeks assistance from a native American who informs him where the arrow has come from.

The Sheriff and a small group of towns folk set out into the desert to find the kidnappers but they're far from prepared to deal with the brutal and cannibalistic methods of the troglodyte clan. For the future of their small town and to save the captures prisoners, the men of Bright Hope must out maneuverer the cannibals.

Sean Young - FedCon 24 - Europe's big SciFi convention held at Hotel Maritim - Day 2 at Hotel Maritim - Dusseldorf, Germany - Friday 22nd May 2015

Sean Young
Sean Young
Sean Young
Sean Young
Sean Young
Sean Young

Sean Young and Carmen Argenziano - FedCon 24 - Europe's big SciFi convention held at Hotel Maritim - Day 1 at Hotel Maritim - Dusseldorf, Germany - Thursday 21st May 2015

Sean Young and Carmen Argenziano
Carmen Argenziano and Sean Young
David Nykl, Carmen Argenziano and Sean Young
Bai Ling, David Nykl, Sean Young and Rob Archer
Sean Young and Edward James Olmos
Bai Ling, David Nykl, Richard Arnold, Paul Mcgann, Grant Browler, Sean Young, Jerry Doyle, Jerri Ryan, David Hewlett, Edward James Olmos, Rob Archer, Manu Intiraymi, Jonathan Del Arco, Carmen Argenziano, Nessi and Fahr Sindram

Sean Young - Celebs took to the red carpet for the special screening of 'John Wick' in New York City, New York, United States - Monday 13th October 2014

Sean Young
Sean Young

Sean Young - Saturday 26th January 2008 at Directors Guild Of America Los Angeles, California

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Sean Young
Sean Young
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Sean Young

Sean Young Friday 27th July 2007 "300" DVD Release Party at PETCO Park San Diego, California

Sean Young

Ace Ventura: Pet Detective Review


Very Good
Where to start for a film like Ace Ventura: Pet Detective is beguiling. Discuss its introduction of quite possibly one of the best comedic and dramatic actors of the last decade? Yammer on about its role in the eventual behemoth of the gross-out/slapstick comedy boom that would finally explode with the Farrelly brothers' There's Something About Mary? Dissect, with careful words, the forgotten, amazingly brief acting career of Funky Cold Medina's biggest fan, Tone Loc? One is at a loss of words as to where to begin to talk about this profoundly absurd film.

It begins with a dolphin. Snowflake, the Dolphins football team's mascot, has been kidnapped and after a brief search, it is decided that only one man is right for the job: Ace Ventura (Jim Carrey). Ventura specializes in crimes involving animals being stolen, lost or mistreated. He's also a total loon; hiding about two dozen species of animal in his apartment, taking dips in shark tanks and harboring an affinity for making his butt talk. When Ace, along with the football teams business assistant Melissa Robinson (Courteney Cox), takes the case, it leads him to a football player, Ray Finkle, who was fired after missing a field goal in the Super Bowl. The murder count rises and the morale of the Dolphins' players' dips as Ace tries to track down Snowflake before the "big game," while also butting heads with Lieutenant Lois Einhorn (a particularly thorny Sean Young).

Continue reading: Ace Ventura: Pet Detective Review

The Amati Girls Review


Terrible
Did you hate those cheesy PBS after-school specials when you were a kid? The ones where the smallest conflict was made into a volcanic crisis but all was miraculously solved within a half an hour's time? If your answer is "yes", stay away from The Amati Girls.

Written and directed by Anne De Salvo, this sickeningly saccharine 91 minutes revolves around a supposedly tight-knit, triple-generation family of women. Each character embodies the ultimate in annoying stereotypes, from selfless martyr to irresponsible wanderer. And of course, they each have a male in their life to represent the standard issues of women's liberation from 30 years ago.

Continue reading: The Amati Girls Review

Dune (1984) Review


Very Good
Did you know David Lynch at one time considered directing Return of the Jedi? Legions of George Lucas fans are probably delighted that he never got the shot, because for better or for worse (probably for worse) it might have turned out like the bizarre sci-fi experiment Dune. I've sometimes been accused of defending Lynch even when he's not working at his best. That's clearly the case here, resulting in a compromised megabudget effort where Lynch attempts to indulge his graphic art sensibility and please a mass audience at the same time. It just doesn't fly.

But Lynch fans might find stuff to enjoy in Dune anyhow. After all, there's a floating bug monster that parlays with Jose Ferrer's space emperor in the early going, flanked by legions of somnambulant slaves in black raincoats that probably inspired the villains in Dark City. This is followed by Kenneth MacMillan's puss-faced Baron Harkonnen floating around on wires, plucking out the heart of an angel-faced boy-toy (who was planting Blue Velvet-style pastel flowers only moments earlier), and sharing some homo-erotic blubbering with his nephew Feyd (played by Sting, who can't act but lends the film his charismatic rock star presence). Even when the plot is difficult to follow -- some nonsense involving a trade war over different planets that all made sense in Frank Herbert's original novel -- there's enough giddy comic book theatrics to keep Dune interesting as it meanders along for nearly three hours.

Continue reading: Dune (1984) Review

Blade Runner Review


Essential
A rare masterpiece in both the sci-fi and film noir genres. Blade Runner makes you think, makes you question reality, and makes you return to watch it again and again. I own both the VHS and the DVD and have seen the movie a dozen times. It gets better with age. The best work of everyone involved with the project, hands down. Harrison Ford is unforgettable as the is-he-or-isn't-he??? cop charged with tracking down a band of "replicants," super-strong and brilliant androids on the loose in a dystopic future. Sean Young might have made her only decent movie with this performance, as well... also playing a replicant who doesn't know she isn't real. Breathtakingly beautiful despite its dour setting, Ridley Scott's moodiness really paid off on this one.

Ace Ventura: Pet Detective Review


Weak
Really bad Jim Carrey vehicle, his first to make any kind of money at the box office and establishing him firmly in the goofball pantheon. Carrey's gotten way better since then, but whew! this one's a stinker.

Stripes Review


Extraordinary
This sloppy but popular comedy stands just behind Bill Murray's best movies -- Caddyshack, Ghostbusters, Groundhog Day, Lost in Translation -- in quality, but stands with them in establishing the film comedy as we now know it: irony-soaked, lowbrow, and funny. As late as the mid-'70s, too many film comedies were earnest, cute throwbacks without a single real laugh. (Thank God for Mel Brooks, who made the only consistently funny comedies of the decade.) Supposedly hilarious films like Shampoo and The Goodbye Girl (or insert another '70s comedy here... I'm having trouble remembering any of them) now seem naïve and lame -- all the more so for trying to be trendy and sophisticated. Such films tried harder to please the critics than the crowds, not by being highbrow but by being frothy.

All that was dead the moment Bill Murray threw the candy bar in the pool in Caddyshack. Critics hated Caddyshack, and called Saturday Night Live skits "mean-spirited," but for everyone else, it was finally OK to be crude, clever, offensive -- and funny. Subsequent films like Stripes, often featuring one or more cast members from SNL (Murray, et al.) or Second City TV (Harold Ramis, John Candy), set the mold. The formula hasn't needed much tweaking since then, either; the successful comedies of recent years (There's Something About Mary, American Pie, etc.) owe everything to them.

Continue reading: Stripes Review

Poor White Trash Review


Excellent
What is it about semi-rural America that makes it so ripe for satirizing American values? It's a longstanding tradition of mockery, from the Coen brothers' Raising Arizona to Lynch's psychotic Blue Velvet and Twin Peaks, to, finally, Michael Addis' Poor White Trash.

Poor White Trash concerns Michael Bronco (Tony Denman), a small-town boy who wants nothing more than to be a psychologist. He spends his evenings talking about how his divorced mother's (Sean Young) anger towards her ex is a shield for her fear of abandonment, and spends his days raisin' hell with Ron Lake (William Devane). One day, the hell raisin' goes a little too far and the two find themselves in court, where they are convicted but get a suspended sentence due to the handiwork of the sleazy Lennie Lake (Jacob Tierney), a gold-toothed hick of a lawyer with a beer-can garden (you really have to witness this bizarre sight to believe it). Thinking that all is fine, the group goes off to celebrate, only to find out that Michael can't get into college now that he's been convicted of a crime.

Continue reading: Poor White Trash Review

Wall Street Review


Excellent
Since the initial release of Wall Street, Oliver Stone's giant-sized 1987 fable, it's been said a million times: Greed Is Good. With those three words, Michael Douglas, as uber-corporate raider Gordon Gekko, defined the tone of not just a single movie but perhaps of an entire decade (even though that's a paraphrase of his actual quote).

The phrase, now famous via Douglas's Oscar-winning performance, was initially uttered by Ivan Boesky, the 1980s business biggie who thrived on doing whatever it took to become rich, and paid the price as a result. Director/co-writer Stone, with Douglas at the epicenter, erects an overdone behemoth of a movie that, like Boesky himself, is an ageless -- and, at times, clichéd -- cautionary tale.

Continue reading: Wall Street Review

Mockingbird Don't Sing Review


OK
This true story comes to us from way back in 1970, when police raided the wildly dysfunctional home of a family who kept their daughter locked in a closet for 14 unspeakably abusive years, still in diapers and unable to speak.

Busted out, her therapists and doctors had a hell of a time reintegrating her into society -- and in fact, she never did learn to speak, confirming a long-held theory that if a child doesn't learn language skills before puberty it never will.

Continue reading: Mockingbird Don't Sing Review

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Sean Young Movies

Bone Tomahawk Trailer

Bone Tomahawk Trailer

Life is quite sedentary in the small town of Bright Hope, the people rely on...

The Amati Girls Movie Review

The Amati Girls Movie Review

Did you hate those cheesy PBS after-school specials when you were a kid? The...

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Poor White Trash Movie Review

Poor White Trash Movie Review

What is it about semi-rural America that makes it so ripe for satirizing American values?...

Even Cowgirls Get The Blues Movie Review

Even Cowgirls Get The Blues Movie Review

A pair of wildly divergent views on Gus Van Sant's Even Cowgirls Get the Blues......

Sugar & Spice Movie Review

Sugar & Spice Movie Review

Until the bank-robbing cheerleaders actually get around to the heist in the stereotype-askew teen comedy...

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