Sean Mcginley

Sean Mcginley

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Opening night of The Walworth Farce

Sean McGinley and Marie McGinley - Opening night of The Walworth Farce at The Olympia Theatre - Arrivals - Dublin, Ireland - Wednesday 14th January 2015

Susan Fitzgerald Funeral

Sean McGinley - Stars from Irish stage and TV at the Funeral of actress Susan Fitzgerald at the Three Patrons Church, Rathgar. Susan was the former wife of Gate Theatre director Michael Colgan. - Dublin, Ireland - Wednesday 11th September 2013

Funeral of actress Susan Fitzgerald

Sean McGinley - The Funeral of actress Susan Fitzgerald at The Church of The Three Patrons, Rathgar - Dublin, Ireland - Wednesday 11th September 2013

'Love/Hate' set

Tom Vaughan-Lawlor and Sean McGinley - Actors filming scenes for the TV show 'Love/Hate' - Dublin, Ireland - Monday 29th April 2013

Tom Vaughan-Lawlor and Sean McGinley
Tom Vaughan-Lawlor and Sean McGinley
Tom Vaughan-Lawlor and Sean McGinley
Sean McGinley
Tom Vaughan-Lawlor and Sean McGinley

The IFTA Awards 2013

Sean McGinley and Wife - The IFTA Awards 2013 Dublin Ireland Saturday 9th February 2013

On a Clear Day Review


Good
Over here in America, it seems we just cannot get enough of the gentle shenanigans of average, everyday Brits. If they are slightly older and perhaps finding themselves financially strapped and driven to eyebrow-raising lengths by the hard times, well, so much the better. Into this proud lineage comes On a Clear Day a charming, if slight, bit of fluff from across the pond that has nothing whatsoever to do with the similarly-titled Barbra Streisand musical from the '70s.Peter Mullan plays Frank, a quiet, middle-aged Scot who is left floundering when he is laid off from his shipbuilding job. He embarks on a mission, seemingly on a lark, to swim the English Channel in an effort to give himself purpose and shed personal demons that have plagued him for years. Admittedly, this is quite thin, plotwise, but if we learned anything but a new dance routine from The Full Monty, it's that working-class British fellows made redundant can be remarkably entertaining in keeping themselves occupied.Though he staunchly refuses to tell his family anything about his intentions, Frank has a small clique of friends - former coworkers, mostly - serving as his motley training crew, headed by a put-upon Chinese fish-and-chips vendor (Benedict Wong) and given hyper energy by the cheerfully hapless Danny (Billy Boyd). They are caught up in Frank's determination to change his life, and predictably inspired to do something new with their own, and it is remarkably sweet and uplifting in a straightforward and non-saccharine way, a rarity these days.First-time feature director Gaby Dellal has crafted a dutifully small and endearing bit of fluff, only faltering briefly with some easily-forgiven flaws. She does fall victim to a hallmark of young directors - the need to be unnecessarily flashy - with her shooting of action via its reflection in a small domed mirror or her slow pans of an ordinary boat. Also, the film is not adept at offering fleshed-out logic. Why this unassuming Scottish man takes on a personal mission to swim the Channel, or what he hopes it will accomplish - and what it does ultimately accomplish - is left unaddressed and open to interpretation. But if you accept the pull of those crazy urges we get from time to time - the desire to do something stupid, and hard, and to revel in a feeling of true accomplishment - then that is probably sufficient in the way of movie logic.What gives the film layers and makes it so watchable is the extremely capable acting. Mullan (My Name is Joe, Young Adam) is an immensely likeable actor, and his Frank is an amiable and capable fellow, but he can also be profoundly frustrating. Being taciturn is one thing, but he often seems to outright ignore his wife (the adorably floopy Brenda Blethyn). And he is deeply scarred by the death of his son nearly 25 years ago, but he's so distant from his surviving son that it borders on rude. This persistent haze that surrounds poor Frank, and mires him into such melancholic inaction, is what prevents On a Clear Day from being a straight-up comedy. All of the characters are witty and quirky (though not aggressively so) and have their moments of amusing antics, but they are also each battling a very real sadness, and the film does well in striking a balance between the two.There is little about On a Clear Day that is especially profound or innovative, to be sure. The most effusive praise it will likely garner is that it is genuinely cute and sweet without becoming twee or simplistic. That said, there is certainly a place - and a market - for films like these. I certainly know what I'll be telling my Auntie to see the next time she tells me they don't make "nice movies" anymore.Nope, can't see forever.

Conspiracy Of Silence Review


Weak
News flash!

Have you heard? Apparently there's some priests in the Catholic church that might be, um, gay. And apparently this might be interfering with their vows of chastity, not to mention their vows of not being gay.

Continue reading: Conspiracy Of Silence Review

The Butcher Boy Review


Excellent
Steller film that I resisted on opening, for some reason. Wish I hadn't. This homage to A Clockwork Orange follows young Francie Brady (Owens) on a path of destruction through Kennedy-era Ireland. Jordan's best work since The Crying Game, and right when I'd given up on him. Delicious.

Continue reading: The Butcher Boy Review

The General Review


OK
It was a critical darling but I can't figure out why. Based on a true story, Gleeson plays the lovable oaf of an Irish folk hero and two-bit gangster Martin Cahill. The bulk of the film involves a couple of "daring" robberies Cahill and his working-class gang pulled off and the heat the police, the IRA, and the UVF bring down on him. Cahill as a character is a bizzare one, notably due to the two women he keeps and an eccentric personality, to say the least. But the film is flat, partially owing to its well over 2-hour running time but mainly due to the ultra-thick Irish accents, poor sound quality, and the fact the Gleeson spends most of the movie with his hand covering his face. Large chunks of The General are completely incomprehensible. And I'm not about to watch it again.

The Closer You Get Review


OK
In Angela's Ashes, we got the impression that growing up a kid in Ireland really sucks. In The Closer You Get, we are made to believe that Irish adulthood doesn't get much better.

All right... so we don't have to wait till the sequel to see Emily Watson be cremated and we don't have to sit through two hours and twenty minutes of a film that make a suicidal lemming seem like a happy chump, but The Closer You Get isn't exactly a movie that sketches the Irish as progressing far into their adulthood. In store for Irish men in adulthood is a simple life of multiple pints of flat Guinness combined with a sexual desperation so great that the Irish men take out a want ad in the Miami Herald.

Continue reading: The Closer You Get Review

Simon Magus Review


Terrible
What the hay? Noah Taylor plays a young (and crazy) Jew who is cast out of his temple because he makes up his own words to the prayers -- not to mention because he thinks he talks to the devil, too -- and then he gets all wrapped up in a local land squabble. Huh? Either I just didn't get this... or it really was a lost couple of hours.

Continue reading: Simon Magus Review

The Closer You Get Review


Weak

An amusing but forgettable, light rural comedy from Ireland, the generically titled "The Closer You Get" is another aren't-men-adorable-dimwits satire, about the lonely lads of a craggy coastal hamlet who concoct a inept plan to import sexy American girls for courting.

With most of the local gals unavailable or uninterested, this desperate lot of paunchy, pasty, ruddy Irishmen (lead by Ian Hart, "Backbeat") buy a classified in the Miami Herald advertising for marriage-minded, "attractive girls 20 to 21." Then they smarten themselves up as best they can and start a daily stakeout at the bus stop just outside town, anticipating the arrival of interested parties.

Of course, its a foredrawn conclusion that none show up and the men will pair off with local lassies after all -- but only after becoming jealous when the likable village women conspire to mock them by romancing a gypsy-like band of seasonal Spanish fishermen.

Continue reading: The Closer You Get Review

The Claim Review


Grim

It's clear from the almost corporeal sense of time and place achieved in "The Claim," a tightly-wound melodrama set during the twilight of the Gold Rush, that director Michael Winterbottom made a very great effort to bring a broad vision to the screen.

The beautifully photographed High Sierra township of Kingdom Come, where the film is set, stirs with a sense of hardship and rugged lives. It feels entrenched against the harsh wintry elements that besiege it. It feels civilized but dangerous. It's a place for people who sold their souls to thrive, or maybe just to survive.

Daniel Dillon (Peter Mullan) runs this town -- scratch that, he owns it. But it came at a greedy price that has haunted him for 18 years. Trekking west as a young '49er, Dillon swapped his wife and baby daughter to a miner in exchange for his claim -- a claim that made him the rich and powerful baron.

Continue reading: The Claim Review

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