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Sean Connery

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Sean Connery New York City, USA US Open 2012 Men's Match - Celebrity Sighting - USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center Thursday 6th September 2012

Sean Connery
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Sean Connery
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Sean Connery

Sean Connery - Sean Connery in the crowd Thursday 6th September 2012 US Open 2012 Men's Singles, David Ferrer v. Janko Tipsarevic, held at USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center. Ferrer won in five sets, 6-3, 7-6, 6-2, 6-3, 7-6.

Sean Connery
Sean Connery
Sean Connery
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Sean Connery - Sir Sean Connery with his wife Micheline Edinburgh, Scotland - Edinburgh International Film Festival - 'Toy Story 3' - Premiere Saturday 19th June 2010

Sean Connery
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Sean Connery - Sir Sean Connery Edinburgh, Scotland - Edinburgh International Film Festival - 'The Illusionist' - World Premiere Wednesday 16th June 2010

Sean Connery
Micheline Connery and Sean Connery
Sean Connery
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Sean Connery and Donald Trump - Sean Connery and Donald Trump New York City, USA - 2010 'Dressed To Kilt' Charity Fashion Show at M2 Ultralounge - Backstage Monday 5th April 2010

Sean Connery and Donald Trump
Sean Connery and His Wife Micheline Roquebrune
Sean Connery

Sean Connery and AFI Wednesday 1st October 2008 Target presents AFI Night at the Movies held at Arclight Theatre Hollywood, California

Sean Connery and Afi
Sean Connery and Afi
Sean Connery and Afi
Micheline Connery, Afi and Sean Connery

Sean Connery and Tilda Swinton - Sir Sean Connery and Tilda Swinton Edinburgh, Scotland - Edinburgh Film Festival - Day 4 - Patrons of the festival at the Point Penthouse Saturday 21st June 2008

Sean Connery and Tilda Swinton
Sean Connery
Sean Connery and Tilda Swinton
Sean Connery
Sean Connery and Tilda Swinton
Sean Connery and Tilda Swinton

Sean Connery and The Edge - Sir Sean Connery Edinburgh, Scotland - Edinburgh Film Festival - Day 1 - 'The Edge Of Love' - Premiere - held at Cineworld Wednesday 18th June 2008

Sean Connery and The Edge
Sean Connery and The Edge
Sean Connery and The Edge
Sean Connery and The Edge

Sean Connery impersonator and Sean Connery Sunday 25th May 2008 The 17th annual Reel Awards celebrates the best celebrity impersonators from around the world at the Imperial Palace Hotel & Casino Las Vegas, Nevada

Sean Connery Impersonator and Sean Connery

Sean Connery - Thursday 7th June 2007 at Afi Life Achievement Award Hollywood, California

Sean Connery
Sean Connery
Sean Connery
Sean Connery

Outland Review


Very Good
You're stuck as a lawman on a moon of Jupiter, where they do nothing but mine titanium. When the shit goes down, who ya gonna call? This harrowing sci-fi flick has mellowed with age over the years, but Sean Connery's performance is still good, and the first couple of acts are still quite engaging. Too bad the finale ends up being one big shootout. Hell, we could get that back on earth.

Indiana Jones And The Last Crusade Review


Essential
Released in 1989, Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade is one of the reasons why I believe in the summer blockbuster. The movie provides us with unadulterated entertainment for more than two hours, which is a nearly impossible feat to pull off these days. And it's a sequel, to boot. I don't think there was thirty minutes of entertainment in Charlie's Angles: Full Throttle and American Wedding combined.

Those two ill-fated movies didn't have half the talent behind Last Crusade. Steven Spielberg is back behind the camera, with executive producer George Lucas co-creating the nifty story, which has Indiana Jones recruited by a wealthy collector (Julian Glover) to find nothing less than the Holy Grail. Along the way, Indy encounters a well-armed band of religious zealots, Nazis, and his fussy father (Sean Connery), the missing leader of the Grail project who doesn't embrace his son's sense of adventure.

Continue reading: Indiana Jones And The Last Crusade Review

The Untouchables Review


Excellent
Why would anybody still want to watch a movie as deeply flawed as The Untouchables? Certainly it's not for historical accuracy: The real Federal Agent Elliot Ness was perfectly happy to dun mob kingpin Al Capone on tax evasion and avoid the intense gunplay that the movie depicts. It's not De Palma: Scarface is his better mob picture, and Blow Out has more drama. And Lord knows it's not the performances: Kevin Costner earned much of his rep as a wet blanket here, and Sean Connery's stubborn refusal to change his accent for his role is almost comic. Never has an Irish cop sounded so Scottish, though Connery did get the last laugh - he took home a Best Supporting Actor Oscar for his role as Jim Malone.

Why watch? Because despite its flaws, The Untouchables is a magnificent movie about political clout -- a worthy subject that Hollywood's rarely bothered to tackle and usually gets wrong. Clout isn't bribing a police chief with a briefcase full of hundred-dollar bills; it's making sure the police chief's son gets a cushy job at your concrete firm, thereby ensuring you're the low bidder on sidewalk contracts. Clout isn't hiring hit men to off your worst enemy and toss him in a ditch; it's buying drinks for a high school buddy who works at the county assessor's office who just happens to find so many structural problems with your enemy's grocery store that he's forced to close shop and leave town. Those aren't events in The Untouchables, but they echo the kind of emotional noise that David Mamet's script makes - it's a revenge fantasy for any person who wondered why they had to suck up to their alderman or local ward heeler just to get their trash picked up on time. Clout isn't muscle - it's clever muscle. And The Untouchables understands that cleverness.

Continue reading: The Untouchables Review

Dragonheart Review


OK
It's going to be a long summer, at this rate.

Trying as hard as possible to be Braveheart with a dragon (hell, look at the title!), Dragonheart is a pretty dismal affair, punctuated by a couple of good performances, a show-stealing computer-generated dragon (with a heart of gold), and a really, really hackneyed story line.

Continue reading: Dragonheart Review

Thunderball Review


Very Good
The first big Big BIG Bond movie, complete with a boat that separates into two pieces, an underwater war, Baccarrat, no fewer than four Bond girls (all of whom found their voices dubbed-over by the same actress), and at least one clever witticism delivered by Connery every five minutes. It's too long and doesn't make any sense at times, but it's a real jaw-dropper (especially for 1965). Crudely remade as Never Say Never Again in 1983. Bond fans should look for the DVD, which features 8 theatrical trailers, 3 making of documentaries, and 2 commentary tracks. Wow.

The Avengers Review


Terrible
I had heard it was bad... but this is downright silly. In a dead heat for worst movie of the year, an unconscionable waste of the prodigious acting talents that made this huge belly flop.

Zardoz Review


Weak
"The gun is good. The penis is evil!" Such is one of many howlers in Zardoz, John Boorman's paean to, well, to I don't know what, but this cross between a low-budget sci-fi movie and a porno flick ranks more with the penis than the gun. The plot involves Sean Connery as a savage in a 2200's dystopia (where they worship a giant rock called Zardoz), who makes his way into a society of nearly-naked immortals, where he wreaks havoc thanks to a computer made out of a large diamond. We'd be shocked by the stupidity if we weren't laughing so hard thanks to Connery's hot pants. If nothing else, Zardoz proves that anyone's career can survive a bad flick or two.

Playing By Heart Review


Good
Every year like clockwork there's a film that tries to intertwine a dozen characters into one monster story: Short Cuts (1993), Twenty Bucks (1993), Pulp Fiction (1994), 2 Days in the Valley (1996), to name but a few. 1998's entry crept in under the wire: Playing By Heart... and it's finally in wide release.

Now on its third (and worst) title in as many months, Heart follows about a dozen Los Angelenos en route to love and/or misery. Among them are Anderson and Stewart as a couple of silly/wacky would-be lovers; club kids Jolie and Phillippe; ice queen Stowe (having an affair with Edwards); and wedded veterans Rowlands and Connery.

Continue reading: Playing By Heart Review

The Hunt For Red October Review


Extraordinary
If any film in Tom Clancy's Jack Ryan series stands out as the best (or even a truly great movie), it's The Hunt for Red October. It was Clancy's first book starring the unlikely hero and the only film to star Alec Baldwin as Ryan. Baldwin does a great job here -- portraying Ryan not as a gung-ho commando, as Harrison Ford would interpret the role, or as a know-it-all brat, as Ben Affleck would shamefully turn in down the line.

Baldwin is perfect, but his sparring partner, Sean Connery, is even better. As a Russian sub captain defecting to the U.S. -- and bringing his titular, silent sub with him -- Connery turns in yet another memorable performance, full of ballsy gusto and cocksureness. Supporting players run the gamut from Sam Neill to James Earl Jones (the only real fixture in the Jack Ryan cycle) to Tim Curry.

Continue reading: The Hunt For Red October Review

The Highlander Review


Extraordinary
One of my all-time favorite guilty pleasures, The Highlander has no equal among sword-and-sorcery flicks. Emphasis on the sword.

From an engimatic Sean Connery to the pulsating Queen soundtrack, the movie has all you could want from an action flick. The flashbacks, the swordfights, "There can be only one," ... gosh, just thinking about The Highlander makes me want to track down some immortals and decapitate them.

Continue reading: The Highlander Review

The League Of Extraordinary Gentlemen Review


Bad
If anything, what The League of Extraordinary Gentleman (aka LXG) does best is give us an original concept for action heroes: a group of characters picked from famous literary works united to fight a common enemy. Though it bears a resemblance to X-Men, LXG sounds great, but falls far short. The film, based on Alan Moore's graphic novels, is just a bunch of mindless shootouts and half-baked special effects with little, if any, time spent on the unique individuals at the heart of the action.

In LXG the film, a madman named "The Phantom" is bent on turning the nations of the world against each other in one gigantic World War. It's up to the British government to thwart his plan, and they have assembled a handsome crew to get the job done. Leading the group is aging adventure seeker Allan Quatermain (Sean Connery) with underlings The Invisible Man (Tony Curran), vampiress Mina Harker (Peta Wilson), Dr. Jekyll and alter ego Hyde (Jason Flemyng), Captain Nemo (Naseeruddin Shah), and Tom Sawyer (Shane West). Once all the introductions are done, the group heads to Venice to protect the world's leaders from the Phantom's attack during a peace conference.

Continue reading: The League Of Extraordinary Gentlemen Review

The Red Tent Review


Very Good
Since they realized they were there, explorers everywhere have had a fascination with visiting the poles of the earth. By 1928, the North Pole had been well visited and documented by the likes of Peary and Amundsen, but Italian Umberto Nobile decided he wanted to head up there anyway. Only Nobile's crackpot idea was to go there in a blimp.

Strangely, because of Nobile's renown in working with Amundsen on his 1926 flight to the Pole, no one said this was a bad idea. One day after daparting, heavy wind ripped the blimp apart, stranding the crew on the Arctic ice, where they holed up in a makeshift red tent, waiting for aid to arrive. For a month they were presumed dead, until an amateur radio operator picked up a transmission. A massive rescue operation commenced, with Amundsen himself even getting in on the deal.

Continue reading: The Red Tent Review

The Name Of The Rose Review


OK
Franciscan and Benedictine monks are dispatched to a remote monastery to resolve a dispute over doctrine in The Name of the Rose. When William of Baskerville (Sean Connery) and his novice Adso (a very young Christian Slater) arrive, they find the discussions have been stalled by the death of a young, talented scribe. The resident monks are all atwitter, wringing their hands and worrying that the murder is a sign of the apocalypse. Their fervor reaches a fever pitch as more of their brethren begin to turn up dead, describing some choice passages of Revelations. So William fires up his logic, ceaselessly name checks Aristotle and begins to piece together a mystery that involves secret secular knowledge, a labyrinthine library, and a struggle between wild religious superstition and cold reason.

Based on Umberto Eco's dense and demanding bestseller, The Name of the Rose, is basically a love letter to Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. Unfortunately, the film version never passes up an opportunity to remind us of that fact.

Continue reading: The Name Of The Rose Review

Finding Forrester Review


OK

What is it lately with all these talented directors challenging themselves to turn TV movie scripts into potent, or at least cogent feature films?

Steven Soderbergh took the lead with "Erin Brockovich" -- a Lifetime Channel story in anybody else's hands -- and with the help of Julia Roberts created this year's Oscar front-runner. Taylor Hackford took the hostage negotiation thriller "Proof of Life" and gave it real punch and humanity, when Hollywood doctrine dictates it should have been either a women's weepy concerning the wife's angst or a Dolph Lungren-level action flick about a rescue raid against Colombian kidnappers.

Now Gus Van Sant, onetime guardian of the quirky avant guard ("To Die For," "Even Cowgirls Get the Blues"), takes on an After School Special of a script about a ghetto littérateur savant and his reclusive white mentor, and creates "Finding Forrester" -- a solidly enjoyable, fairly cerebral feature raised above its roots by stout performances from its two leads.

Continue reading: Finding Forrester Review

The League Of Extraordinary Gentlemen Review


Bad

Adapted from a comic book chock full of literary allusions but summer-movie-ized for the Cliff's Notes set, "The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen" is predictably packed with flash and completely devoid of life.

A turn-of-the-20th-century action flick that tries to evoke an antediluvian "Batman"-ish atmosphere with dark, overzealous production design, this convoluted dud stars Sean Connery as famous fictional British explorer-adventurer Allan Quartermain, who is persuaded to recruit a cadre of period legends to help bring down a terrorist organization bent on starting a world war.

The team consists of Jules Verne's submariner Captain Nemo (Naseeruddin Shah), H.G. Wells' Invisible Man (Tony Curran), Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde (Jason Flemyng), "Dracula" vampiress Mina Harker (Peta Wilson), Oscar Wilde's portrait-dependent immortal Dorian Gray (Stuart Townsend) and a yee-haw Secret Service agent named Tom Sawyer (Shane West) -- yes, that Tom Sawyer -- who was shoe-horned into the script to Americanize the story for U.S. audiences.

Continue reading: The League Of Extraordinary Gentlemen Review

Entrapment Review


Weak

The first sign of trouble in "Entrapment" comes in the very first scene, which is labeled "16 days before the Millennium," betraying that the climax will be -- you guessed it -- dependent on the Y2K bug.

As it turns out, the climax depends on something even more ridiculous -- that the biggest bank in the world would still be Y2K testing on December 31.

But I'm getting ahead of myself here.

Continue reading: Entrapment Review

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Sean Connery

Date of birth

25th August, 1930

Occupation

Actor

Sex

Male

Height

1.89


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Finding Forrester Movie Review

Finding Forrester Movie Review

They're already calling it "Good Will Hunting in the hood," and it's for good reason....

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