The Navy Seal strike that killed Osama Bin Laden on Sunday was reportedly watched by President Obama and White House staffers as it occurred, thanks to tiny cameras integrated into the helmets of The Strike force. But television news executives indicate that the administration may never release the video. Today's (Tuesday) New York Post quoted one unnamed network news veteran as saying, "Every news organization in the world is asking for it right now and not one of them thinks it will ever see the light of day." Other news executives complained that the White House has not even responded to requests for the video. CBS News President David Rhodes told the newspaper, "We have all these people working on it but I wouldn't want to predict when we're going to see it." Presumably the White House is concerned that the tape could further inflame the passions of Arab extremists. Meanwhile, reports emerged that Osama bin Laden had recorded a tape that was to be released only in the event of his death. On CNN Monday, Anderson Cooper remarked that no show that he was on or was associated with would air the tape. Cooper called bin Laden a mass murderer who should never be heard from again. The issue is certain to raise ethical debate. The late Ed Bradley was both scorned and praised for his 60 Minutes interview with Oklahoma City bomber Timothy McVeigh, as was Dan Rather when he interviewed Saddam Hussein.

03/05/2011