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Sony Leak: Scott Rudin and Amy Pascal's Fiery Exchange on Angelina

Tags: Amy Pascal - Scott Rudin - Angelina Jolie

So at first all we got from the Sony leak was a couple of decent reviewed movies. But now? Now, we've got all the juicy stuff, including a ferocious exchange between studio co-chair Amy Pascal and produce Scott Rudin. We also got some pretty heated passages about Angelina Jolie and Megan Ellison.

Amy PascalAmy Pascal had an explosive email conversation with producer Scott Rudin

The focus of the fiery exchange was a back-and-forth between Pascal and Rudin concerning the upcoming Steve Jobs biopic. Now, we already know that this project has been blighted by various drop-outs and casting problems, though it seems that David Fincher's departure may have been down to more than just money.

Continue reading: Sony Leak: Scott Rudin and Amy Pascal's Fiery Exchange on Angelina

Paul Greengrass Aims to Make Hollywood's True '1984' Adaptation

Tags: Paul Greengrass - Scott Rudin

For such an influential and powerful novel, Hollywood has always struggled to get on with George Orwell's dystopian tale, Nineteen Eighty-Four. The eighties version with John Hurt as Winston Smith and Richard Burton as O'Brien was solid, though considering its cast, should have been better. 

Captain PhillipsPaul Greengrass and Scott Rudin previously worked on last year's awards hit, Captain Phillips

Now, on the back of a slew of dystopian successes, British director Paul Greengrass believes he can remake the classic story for a modern audience and is in the early stages of developing a new movie.

Continue reading: Paul Greengrass Aims to Make Hollywood's True '1984' Adaptation

The Grand Budapest Hotel Review


Wes Anderson's entertaining filmmaking style clicks beautifully into focus for this comical adventure. Films like The Darjeeling Limited and Moonrise Kingdom are packed with amazing detail and terrific characters, but this movie is on another level entirely: fast, smart and engaging, packed with both silly slapstick and intelligent gags. And the sprawling cast is simply wonderful.

It's a story within a story within a story, as an author (Wilkinson) narrates the tale of his 1968 conversation as a young writer (Law) with ageing hotelier Zero (Abraham), who in turn recounts his life as a lobby boy in 1932. Young Zero (Revolori) learned his craft alongside legendary concierge Gustave (Fiennes) at the Grand Budapest Hotel somewhere in Middle Europe, and stuck by Gustave's side when he became embroiled in an inheritance battle with a spoiled heir (Brody) and his evil henchman (Dafoe). As things get increasingly nasty, Zero and his baker girlfriend (Ronan) help Gustave fight for justice, and when that doesn't work he helps orchestrate an elaborate prison escape. Meanwhile, war breaks out twice across Europe.

The double flashback structure makes this a film about the power of storytelling itself, and even more potent is the reminder that we need to remember the old ways, especially as the world changes around us. This simple idea is woven so cleverly into the DNA of the script that it continually takes our breath away, conveying the true importance of history and nostalgia. At the centre, Fiennes gives his best-ever performance, showing a real gift for comedy (who knew?) as he makes the bristly Gustave deeply likeable. His camaraderie with newcomer Revolori is priceless, as are the cameos from an array of Anderson veterans including Murray, Wilson and the always astonishing Swinton.

Continue reading: The Grand Budapest Hotel Review

Inside Llewyn Davis Review


The Coen brothers have a wry twinkle in their eyes as they take us on a lyrical journey with a hugely likeable musician for whom success is only barely out of reach. It's also an engaging exploration of both the the early 1960s New York folk music scene that gave us Bob Dylan and the tenacity it takes to make your dreams come true.

It's 1961, and Llewyn Davis (Isaac) isn't sure he wants to fight anymore. His career has stalled, and he's moving from couch to couch trying to pick up gigs. But he doesn't have anything to lose, and when he inadvertently acquires a pet cat he has a bit of purpose for a change. On the other hand, his longtime friendship with husband-and-wife folk duo Jim and Jean (Timberlake and Mulligan) is strained when Jean tells him she's pregnant with a child that might be his. In need of cash, he takes a job in Chicago, taking a long road-trip with two nutcases (Hedlund and Goodman). And he even considers re-enlisting in the Merchant Marines.

Despite Llewyn's quiet desperation, the Coens keep the film's tone light and endearing, with constant comical touches that keep us smiling right to the cleverly elliptical ending. They also pack the movie with folk music that's gorgeously produced by T Bone Burnett, offering emotive counterpoints to Llewyn's sardonic sense of humour. His snappy wit often gets him into trouble, but we can immediately see his depth of character as well, and Isaac is terrific in the role, the kind of guy we would happily spend a lot more time with.

Continue reading: Inside Llewyn Davis Review

Captain Phillips Review


With an attention to documentary detail that makes everything viscerally realistic, this film grabs hold and never lets go, cranking the suspense to nearly unbearable levels and then tightening its grip even further. Like director Greengrass' United 93, this is a film that makes us forget our daily routine, sending us on a harrowing journey that feels more like a life experience than watching a movie.

It's based on true events from March 2009, when Richard Phillips (Hanks) took a routine job captaining a cargo ship filled with food aid from Oman to Kenya. Then off the coast of Somalia, they're attacked by the tenacious pirate Muse (Abdi) and his three cohorts (Abdirahman, Ahmed and Ali). These aren't terrorists, they're desperate young men who take violent action only because they have to. But their demands for money go unmet, and the stand-off escalates as Phillips' crew fights back against the armed intruders. Then the American Navy responds with overwhelming force, trying to calm the situation without getting Phillips killed.

Aside from one background sequence in Somalia, we watch the entire story through Phillips' eyes, which makes us feel like we are right in the middle of it. Greengrass insists on realism, refusing to indulge in digital trickery when he can get real ships and helicopters out on the ocean instead. This gives the film a jolt of authenticity that's impossible to re-create in a studio, as we can feel the isolation of the expansive sea as well as the dangerous claustrophobia in the pod-like lifeboat where the climactic scenes play out. And there isn't a false note. Even with a well-known actor like Hanks in the central role, we are completely drawn in.

Continue reading: Captain Phillips Review

Picture - Scott Rudin New York City, USA, Thursday 27th May 2010

Scott Rudin Thursday 27th May 2010 Outer Critics Circle Theatre Awards held at Sardi's restaurant. New York City, USA

Picture - Joel Cohen, Ethan Cohen, Walter... Los Angeles, California, Saturday 2nd February 2008

Scott Rudin, Ethan Cohen, Walter Mirisch and Joel Cohen - Joel Cohen, Ethan Cohen, Walter Mirisch, and Scott Rudin pose with the Darryl F. Zanuck Producer of the Year award for Theatrical Motion Pictures for 'No Country For Old Men' Saturday 2nd February 2008 at Beverly Hilton Hotel Los Angeles, California

Scott Rudin:
News Pictures Film

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