Scott Caan

Scott Caan

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Rock The Kasbah Trailer


Sometimes, life can really take a turn when you least expect it. For one man, things about to go completely off the rails. Richie Lanz (Bill Murray) has been a tour manager for some of the greatest rock bands of all time, and his latest project is about to stir up something special. After becoming the tour manager for a young woman (Zooey Deschanel), he informs her that they are putting on a show in Afghanistan. Terrified, she runs away after they arrive, taking Lanz' wallet and passport with her. Now, stuck in Afghanistan, Lanz is forced to do what he can to find a way home, while doing what he can to enjoy the rocking lifestyle he has come to know and love along the way.

Continue: Rock The Kasbah Trailer

Scott Caan at the Farmers Market

Scott Caan - Scott Caan cuts across the Farmers Market after having breakfast with friends at Joans On Third - Los Angeles, California, United States - Sunday 14th June 2015

Scott Caan
Scott Caan

Premiere of 'Entourage' - Arrivals

Scott Caan - Warner Bros. Pictures' L.A. Premiere of 'Entourage' held at The Regency Village Theatre - Arrivals at Village Theater, Regency Village Theatre - Westwood, California, United States - Tuesday 2nd June 2015

Scott Caan and Kacy Byxbee
Scott Caan
Scott Caan and Kacy Byxbee
Scott Caan
Scott Caan

Premiere of 'Entourage' - Arrivals

Scott Caan - Warner Bros. Pictures' L.A. Premiere of 'Entourage' held at The Regency Village Theatre - Arrivals at The Regency Village Theater, Regency Village Theatre - Los Angeles, California, United States - Monday 1st June 2015

Scott Caan
Scott Caan
Scott Caan
Scott Caan

Picture - Scott Caan , Sunday 29th July 2012

Scott Caan Sunday 29th July 2012 CBS Showtime's CW Summer 2012 Press Tour at the Beverly Hilton Hotel - Arrivals

Picture - Alex O'Loughlin, Scott Caan and... , Sunday 29th July 2012

Alex O'Loughlin, Masi Oka and Scott Caan - Alex O'Loughlin, Scott Caan and Masi Oka Sunday 29th July 2012 CBS Showtime's CW Summer 2012 Press Tour at the Beverly Hilton Hotel - Arrivals

Alex O'Loughlin, Masi Oka and Scott Caan

Video - Scott Caan Owns A Shiny Vintage Pick-Up Truck


'Hawaii Five-0' star Scott Caan drives away in his vintage blue pick-up truck after a day out in LA.

Earlier this month it was revealed that Caan is also a talented playwright, his latest project being 'No Way Around It But Through' which was shown at the Los Angeles Falcon Theatre. The play is essentially a dark comedy. He tells Theatermania.com: 'It comes from a really dark dysfunctional place. But it's fun for me to kind of find laughter in that' and adds, 'I like to find humor in things that aren't funny.'

Video - Scott Caan getting into his vintage truck after shopping in Malibu


Scott Caan getting into his vintage truck after shopping in Malibu

Ocean's Thirteen Review


Good
The jazzy music, saturated-to-bleeding colors, and even the credits font make it clear from the outset: Ocean's Thirteen is more variety show than heist thriller. The gang of thieves from Ocean's Eleven and Ocean's Twelve is re-assembled, and while their new scam is more of a group effort than the scattered riffing of Twelve, its building-block cons are as cool and varied as ever.

Returning to the stage, the Ocean crew: Rusty (Brad Pitt) puts on scraggly facial hair to play a seismologist. Linus (Matt Damon) prepares to seduce a casino employee (Ellen Barkin), a task that, he insists, requires a prosthetic nose. Basher (Don Cheadle) mostly minds a giant piece of construction equipment, but impersonates a motorcycle daredevil on the fly as an elaborate distraction. The brothers Malloy (Casey Affleck and Scott Caan) are off to Mexico. George Clooney's Billy Ocean, as usual, acts as ringleader, which means a lot of standing around looking fabulous in suits, as well as one spectacularly well-timed eyeroll.

Continue reading: Ocean's Thirteen Review

Brooklyn Rules Review


Grim
Oh, brother. Or, as they say it in Brooklyn, oh, brudda. You've seen Brooklyn Rules before. Many times before. A cliché-clogged and utterly unsurprising mash-up of A Bronx Tale, Goodfellas, and even Saturday Night Fever (the Verrazano Bridge looms ominously in the background of many exterior shots), this coming-of-age tale tracks three best friends from Bay Ridge as they try to make a go of life in a Mob-run neighborhood. This town is so steeped in Mafia madness that even the most casual walk in the woods will ultimately lead to a cosa nostra killing field.

As teenagers in 1985 (cue the best-of-the-'80s soundtrack), Michael (Freddie Prinze, Jr.), Carmine (Scott Caan), and Bobby (Jerry Ferrara) are veering onto different paths. Bobby is the chubby and lovable lunkhead, so stupid he fears failing the Post Office application test. Carmine is the baby goodfella, a hyper stud who takes note of the money and respect that the local bosses have and can't imagine why he shouldn't join up with their crew. And Michael is the one who wants "to get out of this hellhole." An ambitious orphan, he's stumbling through Columbia on a pre-law track and has the hots for Connecticut preppie ice queen Ellen (Mena Suvari), who finds Michael's Brooklyn background attractively "edgy."

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Into the Blue Review


Unbearable
I wonder what went through the studio exec's head when he found out about the release schedule of Into the Blue. It's a movie about fun in the Caribbean sun that's coming out while the Caribbean is in hurricane season. It's an extended swimsuit ad that's coming out when people won't be buying swimsuits. That alone should start the pissed off product reps lining up at his door with baseball bats. But if he thinks that beating is bad, he should wait until the people that saw the movie show up.

Into the Blue isn't just a bad movie. It's an endless font of implausibility and boredom whose only redeeming quality is watching the his and hers sex symbols on the screen.

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Lonely Hearts Review


Weak
If it's one thing you learn about loving old movies, it's that sooner or later some hell spawn from the lowest depths of the lowest ring of the underworld will get the idea that he (or she) should remake it. You can't stop them, and praying seems to only make them madder. So, the fact that someone signed off on a remake of Leonard Kastle's paradigm of depravity, The Honeymoon Killers, shouldn't come as too big a surprise. But that doesn't mean you have to be happy about it.

First-time director Todd Robinson kicks off the festivities with the suicide of Detective Robinson's wife. As it happens, Detective Elmer Robinson (John Travolta) has taken his time attempting to get over his wife's death, and is just now opening up to a secretary at his office (Laura Dern). His partner Charlie (the great James Gandolfini) thinks it's healthy and that things are on the up and up. Then, a case lands on their desk that's a little too perverse for words. A couple, posing as brother and sister, answer "lonely hearts" ads promising love and security, only to end up bilking the mark for all they're worth and killing them. The investigation leads to a nurse named Martha Beck (Salma Hayek) and a wannabe playboy named Ray Fernandez (Jared Leto, with a ridiculous moustache and an absurd accent). The film follows Charlie and Elmer's pursuit of the Lonely Hearts Killers until a rather brutal holdout at a farm, where the couple find their last mark.

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Friends with Money Review


Excellent
It's hard to be in L.A. - to live, to visit, to see in movies - and not think that being jaw-droppingly wealthy is the only way to live life. People drive tricked-out cars worth as much as the (astronomical) average housing price and think nothing of tossing away a few hundred on a pair of ripped jeans because they hug the butt just so. This casual relationship with opulence is the setting for Friends with Money, writer-director Nicole Holofcener's (Walking and Talking, Lovely & Amazing) new comedy about how tough the world can be for the haves and the have-mores.Not some "money doesn't solve everything" morality play - if anything, money solves a heck of a lot here - we instead get a more general look at the dissatisfaction and ennui striking women of a certain age, regardless of whether they are rich or not. (But not, apparently, if they are really, really rich - then they get to be happy.) It's familiar ground for Holofcener, whose semi-feminist films always follow a group of women trying to work out a sense of identity at a particular stage of life.So what do these women, walking illustrations of "having it all," have to complain about? Well, for Christine (Catherine Keener, a Holocener mainstay), the problem is her crumbling marriage to an unsympathetic and superior screenwriting partner/husband. Jane (Frances McDormand) is a chichi clothing designer in a life crisis that who quits washing her hair and is sent into fits of apoplectic rage by everyday aggravations in traffic and customer service. It's very baffling to her sweet, sympathetic, and very probably straight husband. Only Franny (Joan Cusack), the wealthiest of the bunch, seems to have a functioning marriage and a deeply satisfying life as a stay-at-home-mom (with full time help, of course - no need to be primitive).And then there is Olivia (Jennifer Aniston); poor, unmarried, childless, house cleaner Olivia. She is likely supposed to be the stunted one, but... it's still Jennifer Aniston; she's hardly a plebe. Olivia has taken to drifting through life, smoking a lot of pot, obsessively stalking a past (married) lover, and letting her current guy degrade mistreat her - and pay for the privilege. The film's title (and casting) suggest that Olivia is meant to be the focus, but her melancholic foundering isn't really given a priority in screen time. It's a good thing, too, considering her passivity doesn't always make her the most interesting.Friends offers little indication how these four women became close, with Olivia so much younger and leading an utterly different life. Franny comments that she isn't certain whether they still would be friends if they met now; but for the other two, there is the feeling they keep Olivia around to maintain a sense of superiority - their lives may be disintegrating, but at least they aren't maids. Olivia clearly has a tendency towards masochism, but at least her friendships offer something to aspire to.That is the crux of the appeal - and potentially off-putting nature - of Holofcener's work: Her women are complicated, troubled, and often inscrutable. They are not always likeable, or fleshed out to minute details, and they rarely experience grand transformations or realizations. But they are always relatable - who hasn't wanted to lash out when someone brazenly cuts in line and totally gets away with it? - and Holofcener writes them brilliantly acerbic and sharp, so her script stays jaunty and blithe (lean, too, at under 90 minutes).It might have no real resolutions to speak of, and male characters are shallowly drawn and peripheral at best, but Friends with Money is the kind of chick flick that offers genuine accessibility instead of rah-rah sisterhood empowerment. And if still working on figuring out who you are when you're already supposed to be a grown up offers no kinship, well, we've all sat awake at night, pondering where to donate that extra two mil so it doesn't burn us at tax time.Friend with monkey.

Dallas 362 Review


OK
Scott Caan wrote and directed this film about, um, himself and his erstwhile brother Rusty (Shawn Hatosy), two lovable toughs/borderline losers determined to make something good of their lives. That is, if they can stop fighting in bars and working for the local bookie as enforcer muscle. The meandering film is well meaning but derivative of many twentysomething-ennui indies, though it's bolstered by a fun performance by Jeff Goldblum as a stoner shrink and Kelly Lynch as the boys' mom, caught topless (and in bed with Goldblum) in just about every other scene she's in.

Black And White (1999) Review


OK
A very unique and brutal subculture exists in America these days. It's a strange juxtaposition of harsh street life and uber-materialistic greed tempered with a sense of justifiability from a code of unwritten ethics. The world is that of the gangsta rappers, the ghetto boys, and the thug-life advocators that dominate the world of hip-hop and rap music. Black and White, the latest film by James Toback, explores this subculture that grows stronger with every new generation it affects.

The hardest thing about an outsider trying to infiltrate a subculture and explain it to the masses is that the truth is often lost in the translation. Toback throws together a huge canvas of characters and actors in attempt to create a clear picture of why white kids are motivated to impersonate black rappers' lifestyles and why rich whit guys treat black rappers like Arnold and Willis from Diff'rent Strokes.

Continue reading: Black And White (1999) Review

Scott Caan

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