Scott Bairstow

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New Best Friend Review


Terrible
If the people behind the Girls Gone Wild videos were ever to develop a movie, New Best Friend would be it. Beautiful women grind on each other, share long, lingering kisses and (un)dress like they're preparing for a Maxim cover shoot.

Not a single shred of thought was invested in making this movie. There's not one sympathetic character or interesting thought to be found. If half the budget were actually spent on belly shirts and hair gel, I wouldn't be shocked.

Continue reading: New Best Friend Review

Dead In The Water Review


Good
It's really tempting the Hollywood fates to title your indie film Dead in the Water, and judging from the fact that I'd never heard of this movie before it's DVD release, I'd say it was a bad move.

Three teens take an ill-fated boat trip in a story that somehow feels awfully familiar (think A Simple Plan meets The Talented Mr. Ripley), which is what happens when you get three guys and a girl on a boat off the coast of Rio. Dominique Swain plays the femme fatale (has she ever been anything else?) who tempts not only her boyfriend, but his best friend and the Brazilian son of a business partner to her dad. The swordfight turns ugly when boyfriend (Scott Bairstow) tosses the Brazilian (Sebastian DeVicente) into the ocean with nothing but a life preserver. To teach him a lesson, the boyfriend zooms off out of sight... but when they return to pick him up, he's gone -- apparently drowned.

Continue reading: Dead In The Water Review

Tuck Everlasting Review


Bad
Tuck Everlasting opens as a young man on a motorcycle arrives at a homey plantation and studies an object initially unseen by the audience. Later, the movie reveals that the character is two hundred years old and that he's studying a gravestone in somebody's front lawn.

Why anyone would bury a dead carcass in their front lawn is beyond me, but even more absurd is the dark nature of Tuck Everlasting, a bleak story of life and death (based on a "classic" children's novel I've never heard of). Most people wouldn't associate death with Walt Disney Pictures, but its latest flick deals with that issue and worse, revealing subplots of murder, deceit, execution, and the final moments of a human's life. It's hard to believe the creators of Mickey Mouse could construct such a story.

Continue reading: Tuck Everlasting Review

New Best Friend Review


Bad

A boring, unfocused twist on the dangerous-in-crowd B-movie archetype, "New Best Friend" stars innocent yet mysterious Mia Kirshner ("Exotica," "Not Another Teen Movie") as an insecure outcast at a tony North Carolina college who falls into a drug-induced coma a few weeks after falling in with the campus snob squad of well-heeled sexpots.

It seems party girls Meredith Monroe ("Dawson's Creek"), Dominique Swain ("Lolita") and Rachel True ("The Craft") took dowdy, pouty Kirshner under their collective wing and gave her a makeover that changed her life. Freed from her frumpy sweaters and bed-head hair, the girl suddenly lost interest in schoolwork and her one-scene nobody of a best friend. Now she's all about lip gloss, snug little spaghetti-strapped tank tops (braless, naturally) and inexplicably confident flirtations with the Big Man On Campus (Scott Bairstow), who didn't even know she was alive a few scenes earlier when he walked by in studly, teen-movie slow motion.

Now that she's laid up in a hospital bed, her barfly mother is screaming how the popularity triad must have done something to her, and the small town's temporary sheriff (the talented but badly miscast Taye Diggs) is conducting an investigation that the school's snooty dean wants kept quiet.

Continue reading: New Best Friend Review

Tuck Everlasting Review


Good

Disney has always been hit-or-miss when bringing beloved kids' books to the screen, and the studio's latest -- an adaptation of Natalie Babbit's "Tuck Everlasting" -- is a little of both.

It's an early 20th Century story of a curious, affluent teenage girl, stifled by her stiff-upper-lip period parents, who gets lost while seeking an afternoon of freedom in the deep woods behind her estate and meets an enticing young man with a mystical secret -- drinking from a nearby spring has made him and his whole family immortal.

Afraid of being discovered by the outside world that would covet what they've come to consider a curse, the Tuck clan feels they cannot let the young lady go home, even as the area is scoured by search parties. But before long Winnie (Alexis Bledel) isn't exactly aching to leave, having come to know both freedom and romance with the handsome, worldly Jesse (Jonathan Jackson).

Continue reading: Tuck Everlasting Review

Scott Bairstow

Scott Bairstow Quick Links

News Film Comments RSS
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Scott Bairstow Movies

New Best Friend Movie Review

New Best Friend Movie Review

If the people behind the Girls Gone Wild videos were ever to develop a movie,...

Tuck Everlasting Movie Review

Tuck Everlasting Movie Review

Tuck Everlasting opens as a young man on a motorcycle arrives at a homey plantation...

New Best Friend Movie Review

New Best Friend Movie Review

A boring, unfocused twist on the dangerous-in-crowd B-movie archetype, "New Best Friend" stars innocent yet...

Tuck Everlasting Movie Review

Tuck Everlasting Movie Review

Disney has always been hit-or-miss when bringing beloved kids' books to the screen, and the...

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