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White Mischief Review


Very Good
It's lust and... more lust, under the Kenyan sun. In this pulpy 1940s period piece. On the eve of WWII, British colonists are living high on the hog -- none higher than a British noble (Joss Ackland), who returns to Africa with a hot young wife (Greta Scacchi, mostly naked throughout the film), who promptly gets into all sorts of trouble. Namely this involves an affair with a local womanizer (Charles Dance), who ends up dead, shot in the head, before too long. One of Britain's most notorious and "unsolved" murders, Ackland's character stands trial and ultimately goes free. This very interesting and authentically recreated (the story is true) tale is still a bit cold in the final analysis, though Scacchi hits notes she'd never reach again.

Blow-Up Review


Weak
The mid- to late-'60s were a heady time for art cinemas in America. While Hollywood was still saddled with content restrictions that forbade nudity, sex, and other bankable cinematic ingredients, less puritanical cultures like those of France, Italy, and Sweden were turning out highbrow features that played to the id and the intellect at the same time. At the art house, America pondered the role of faith in contemporary society, the bankruptcy of emerging cultural mores, the meaning or meaninglessness of life, and the breasts of European starlets. A new galaxy of superstar directors was introduced to audiences, and among its ranks was Italian Michelangelo Antonioni, who burst on the scene in 1960 with an amazing debut, L'Avventura. With a name like his, the proceedings were bound to be a little arty, and indeed the film was an open-ended, nearly plotless examination of the lives of the idle rich. In the films that followed -- especially La Notte and L'Eclisse -- Antonioni's style emerged as one in which characters wandered about, mankind's deepest emotions were rendered merely fashionable, and the lives on the screen were examined with the blankest imaginable gaze. And there was the frank approach to sex, too, and that helped keep audiences coming.

Blow-Up, released in America in 1966, marked a departure. It was filmed in English and in color, and, it aspired to something like a plot: a photographer in swinging London (David Hemmings) uncovers evidence of a possible murder in the background of a series of pictures he's taken of a couple in a park. (De Palma's 1981 Blow Out is an obvious homage: A sound man records evidence of a murder on tape while recording ambient sounds.) Initially he's intrigued, since this event carries so much more gravity than the activities of his daily life, such as photographing models, driving around in a sports car, and off-handedly buying expensive antiques. But as the clues dry up, his interest does too. And having lost interest (after most of the prints are stolen), he simply throws the last print away.

Continue reading: Blow-Up Review

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