Sarah Green

Sarah Green

Sarah Green Quick Links

News Pictures Film RSS

Midnight Special Review

Excellent

Gifted director Jeff Nichols takes on another genre in his fourth film with actor Michael Shannon, after Shotgun Stories, Take Shelter and Mud. This one's an involving character-based sci-fi adventure made in the style of classic films like E.T. or Close Encounters. As the characters are thrown into an extraordinary situation, the story gradually reveals its fantastical secrets without resorting to the usual overblown blockbuster formula, which makes the movie remarkably resonant and genuinely thrilling.

Shannon plays Roy, a man who is on the run across Texas with his 8-year-old son Alton (Jaeden Lieberher) and his childhood friend Lucas (Joel Edgerton), who's now a state trooper. And the FBI is on their trail, investigating the religious cult they escaped from. Led by the defiant Calvin (Sam Shepard), the cult seems to have been centred around the unusual ability Alton has to gather information from government satellites. Which is why the FBI is so intent on tracking him down. Working with the FBI, NSA Agent Sevier (Adam Driver) is fascinated by Alton's abilities, and he begins to worry what might happen if the boy is captured. Meanwhile, Roy and Lucas have reunited with Alton's mother Sarah (Kirsten Dunst) and are continuing their journey across the American South. And time is clearly of the essence, since Alton is growing seriously ill.

Writer-director Nichols skilfully keeps the audience gripped by the central mystery, dropping in hints and revelations along the way that slowly build up to the final big picture. This forces the viewer into the same perspective as the characters, who don't have a clue what's going on but are gripped by the possibilities of what they're witnessing. This also makes it impossible to predict where the story might go next as it cycles through action, humour, emotion and exhilarating drama. Through all of this, the actors all offer beautiful textures in their characters, underplaying even the most intense scenes to make them feel strikingly realistic.

Continue reading: Midnight Special Review

Sarah Green, Tye Sheridan, Jacob Lofland and Jeff Nichols - 2014 Film Independent Spirit Awards at Santa Monica Beach - Santa Monica, California, United States - Saturday 1st March 2014

Sarah Green, Tye Sheridan, Jacob Lofland and Jeff Nichols

Mud Review


Very Good

Writer-director Nichols continues to get inside the heads of his characters with this involving but overlong dramatic thriller. Like his previous film Take Shelter, this is another fable-like movie, this time harking back to Huck Finn with a boys' adventure story set on the waterways of rural Arkansas. It's impeccably shot and edited, with terrific performances even from side characters. But at over two hours, the long running-time tries our patience.

Our hero is Ellis (Sheridan), a shy but steely 14-year-old who dreams of one day escaping his backwoods community. For entertainment, he explores the rivers with his pal Neckbone (Lofland), and when they hear rumours of a boat stranded in a tree, they have to investigate. Sure enough, there it is, then inside it they discover the fugitive Mud (McConaughey). Even though he's wanted for murder, they decide to help free the boat so he can escape with his battered girlfriend Juniper (Witherspoon), who's hiding in a local motel. But Ellis and Neckbone need some help with this elaborate plan, so they turn to the scary old man (Shepard) who lives across the river.

Cinematographer Adam Stone beautifully captures both the evocative settings and the expressive faces of the actors, who all bring an introspective touch to their characters. Sheridan and Lofland are excellent in the lead roles, which are pretty demanding as these two teens have to grow up quickly. And McConaughey and Witherspoon dive fully into their much flashier roles, constantly surprising us with sparky details that take these people in unexpected directions. There's also a telling smaller role for Nichols' regular Shannon as Neckbone's haunted, sidelined guardian.

Continue reading: Mud Review

To The Wonder Review


Very Good

Frankly, a bad Terrence Malick film is better than 90 percent of movies released in cinemas: but if you thought The Tree of Life was indulgent and overly kaleidoscopic, you should avoid this like the plague. Because this film is even looser and more internalised, taking an impressionistic approach to plot and characters that gives us very few specifics. It also leaves the cast to play mere hints of people who are having crises of faith and love.

After a lushly romantic trip to Paris and Mont Saint-Michel, Neil (Affleck) brings his French girlfriend Marina (Kurylenko) and her 10-year-old daughter Tatiana (Chiline) home to Oklahoma to live. The geography and culture are a shock to both of them, but Marina tells Neil, "If you love me, I'm OK here." So they begin to bond as a family, and Marina turns to local Catholic priest Quintana (Bardem) for support. But he's having a crisis of faith, and she's wondering if she's made a terrible mistake. So when her visa expires, she takes Tatiana and returns to France. In confusion, Neil then turns to his old flame Jane (McAdams). But as their rekindled romance begins to get serious, she realises that he's still in love with Marina.

Malick tells this story with snippets of ideas and feelings. Emmanuel Lubezki's sumptuous cinematography finds raw beauty everywhere, including in Malick's trademark sun-dappled leaves, waving wheat fields and rippling water. But there's also raw beauty in the actors' faces, and we understand their thoughts through breathy voiceovers that offer philosophical musings and biblical texts. As a result, only Marina emerges as a properly defined character with passion and yearnings; everyone else is sketchy and vague. Even Affleck and Bardem, who have strong on-screen presence, never quite register here.

Continue reading: To The Wonder Review

Sarah Greenwood and Katie Spencer - 85th Academy Awards Nominees Luncheon Los Angeles California United States Monday 4th February 2013

Sarah Green, Sarah Greenwood and Katie Spencer
Sarah Green, Sarah Greenwood and Katie Spencer

Sarah Green and Geoffrey Palmer - Sarah Green and Geoffrey Palmer Monday 5th November 2012 The 24th Chickenshed Annual Fundraising Gala at The Guildhall

Sarah Green and Geoffrey Palmer
Sarah Green and Geoffrey Palmer

Sarah Green - Nicolas Gonda, Ecky Malick, and Sarah Green Monday 10th September 2012 2012 Toronto International Film Festival - 'To The Wonder' premiere arrival at the Princess of Wales Theatre.

Lisa Maria Falcone, Matthew Mcconaughey, Reese Witherspoon, Sarah Green, Cannes Film Festival and Tye Sheridan - Tye Sheridan, Aaron Ryder, Lisa Maria Falcone, Sarah Green, Jeff Nichols, Reese Witherspoon, Matthew MCConaughey and Jacob Lofland Saturday 26th May 2012 'Mud' photocall during the 65th annual Cannes Film Festival

Lisa Maria Falcone, Matthew Mcconaughey, Reese Witherspoon, Sarah Green, Cannes Film Festival and Tye Sheridan
Lisa Maria Falcone, Matthew Mcconaughey and Cannes Film Festival
Lisa Maria Falcone, Matthew Mcconaughey and Cannes Film Festival
Lisa Maria Falcone, Matthew Mcconaughey and Cannes Film Festival
Lisa Maria Falcone and Cannes Film Festival
Lisa Maria Falcone and Cannes Film Festival

The Tree Of Life Review


Extraordinary
Malick takes a bold, intensely personal approach to this big story about life, the universe and everything. With echoes of Kubrick and Lynch, but in true Malick style, it's the kind of film we need to let wash over us rather than try to make sense of.

Jack O'Brien (McCracken, then Penn) grows up in the 1950s American Midwest with his harsh-but-caring dad (Pitt), loving mother (Chastain) and little brothers RL and Steve (Eppler and Sheridan). Over the years, events shift and shape the family, including illness, injury and death. But what does it all mean? And can the truths of humanity be traced back to the dawn of evolution or the age of the dinosaurs?

Continue reading: The Tree Of Life Review

Frida Review


Very Good
After withstanding a decade of development, a race between two competing projects, and the mural-sized egos of Jennifer Lopez and Madonna, a film biography of Frida Kahlo has finally made it to the screen. Who would have guessed that a film about a mustachioed, Mexican woman with a peg leg and an overweight, Communist husband would generate so much interest? Nevertheless Frida's producers, including star Salma Hayek, somehow prevented this unique story from becoming a disastrous vanity project and ended up with an unlikely Hollywood film.

Frida Kahlo's (Salma Hayek) first meeting with Diego Rivera (Alfred Molina) and her injury in a horrible bus accident set in motion the two major forces behind Frida. Bedridden for months in a full-body cast, the young Frida keeps herself busy--and learns to express her internal passions and pain--through drawing and painting. Falling in with the womanizing Rivera and his bohemian cadre of artists and revolutionaries deepens Frida's commitment to her painting and life with the loyal but philandering muralist. Their art carries them from Mexico to New York and back in the company of such impressive historical figures as David Alfaro Siqueiros (Antonio Banderas), Nelson Rockefeller (Ed Norton), and Leon Trotsky (Geoffery Rush).

Continue reading: Frida Review

Oleanna Review


Excellent
Filmmakers rarely tackle sensitive, controversial subjects. Most of the projects that get kudos (and Oscars) for taking on tough issues are obvious attempts to exploit controversies that have been settled, and in which the politically-correct opinion has pretty much won the day, like the liability of tobacco companies (The Insider).

This is not true, however, of David Mamet's Oleanna, which fearlessly addressed the issues of sexual harassment with the subtlety of a slap in the face. Oleanna was first a play that made theater audiences upset and angry before it became a movie that died at the box office, probably killed by its political content. Opinions have differed about the play/film's effectiveness. This reviewer felt that the film tried a little too hard to make the audience squirm -- but it also forced me to think.

Continue reading: Oleanna Review

The Winslow Boy Review


Extraordinary
David Mamet scores again, and in the unlikeliest of films.

I've known and respected Mamet's directorial work since the gritty House of Games (1987) and have remained a fan through last year's The Spanish Prisoner. Without fail, Mamet works on gritty, hard-edged con-artistry-related flicks like these. So it's with no small amount of skepticism that I greeted the G-rated Winslow Boy.

Continue reading: The Winslow Boy Review

State And Main Review


Extraordinary
In order to see one of 2000's real treasures, most of you are going to have to wait until January of 2001, when the masterful State and Main comes to a theater near you.

State and Main, written and directed by David Mamet (The Spanish Prisoner, The Winslow Boy, House of Games), follows a Hollywood film crew into the sleepy town of Waterford, Vermont, for the shooting of a would-be blockbuster. William H. Macy plays the director -- part ballbuster, part smooth-talker -- who comes to Waterford after the production kicked out of another lost-in-the-past New England locale.

Continue reading: State And Main Review

Dirty Dancing: Havana Nights Review


Bad
In the middle of the lousy Dirty Dancing: Havana Nights, Patrick Swayze makes an appearance as a hotel dance instructor. At first, I laughed like mad over this kitschy connection: Swayze! This was tremendous. Were more Dirty Dancing alumni going to appear? Was Cynthia Rhodes going to pop up as a chorus girl? Jennifer Grey as a lifeguard?

However, as a still agile Swayze danced with the new movie's star, Romola Garai, it dawned on me: The new movie needed Swayze, or rather his hunky heir. Part of what made the original Dirty Dancing so appealing was Swayze's presence. Physically, you couldn't take your eyes off him, and he had a cool, aloof sex appeal that set up good girl Grey to fall madly in love with him. And Grey did a masterful job falling for his charms, slowly and assuredly.

Continue reading: Dirty Dancing: Havana Nights Review

Sarah Green

Sarah Green Quick Links

News Pictures Film RSS
Advertisement

Occupation

Filmmaker


Suggested

Shia Labeouf Got 12 Tattoos While Making American Honey

Shia Labeouf Got 12 Tattoos While Making American Honey

Over the past five years, Shia LaBeouf has gone from promising young actor to unemployable disaster and back again.

Mark Wahlberg Enjoyed The Risks He Took In Deepwater Horizon

Mark Wahlberg Enjoyed The Risks He Took In Deepwater Horizon

In Deepwater Horizon, Mark Wahlberg reteams with his Lone Survivor director Peter Berg.

Advertisement
Relive Kate Bush's 2014 Live Show With 'Before The Dawn'

Relive Kate Bush's 2014 Live Show With 'Before The Dawn'

The live album is set for released in November.

Advertisement

Sarah Green Movies

Midnight Special Movie Review

Midnight Special Movie Review

Gifted director Jeff Nichols takes on another genre in his fourth film with actor Michael...

Mud Movie Review

Mud Movie Review

Writer-director Nichols continues to get inside the heads of his characters with this involving but...

To the Wonder Movie Review

To the Wonder Movie Review

Frankly, a bad Terrence Malick film is better than 90 percent of movies released in...

The Tree of Life Movie Review

The Tree of Life Movie Review

Malick takes a bold, intensely personal approach to this big story about life, the universe...

Advertisement
Frida Movie Review

Frida Movie Review

After withstanding a decade of development, a race between two competing projects, and the mural-sized...

Oleanna Movie Review

Oleanna Movie Review

Filmmakers rarely tackle sensitive, controversial subjects. Most of the projects that get kudos (and Oscars)...

The Winslow Boy Movie Review

The Winslow Boy Movie Review

David Mamet scores again, and in the unlikeliest of films.I've known and respected Mamet's directorial...

State and Main Movie Review

State and Main Movie Review

In order to see one of 2000's real treasures, most of you are going to...

Dirty Dancing: Havana Nights Movie Review

Dirty Dancing: Havana Nights Movie Review

In the middle of the lousy Dirty Dancing: Havana Nights, Patrick Swayze makes an appearance...

Advertisement
Artists
Actors
    Filmmakers
      Artists
      Bands
        Musicians
          Artists
          Celebrities
             
              Artists
              Interviews
                musicians & bands in the news
                  actors & filmmakers in the news
                    celebrities in the news

                      Go Back in Time using our News archive to see what happened on a particular day in the past.