Sarah Bolger

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US-Ireland Alliance pre Oscar event - Arrivals

Sarah Bolger - US-Ireland Alliance pre Oscar event honoring Stephen Colbert, Carrie Fisher and Colin Davidson held at Bad Robot - Arrivals at Bad Robot Santa Monica - Los Angeles, California, United States - Thursday 19th February 2015

Sarah Bolger

US Ireland Alliance to Honor Stephen Colbert, Carrie Fisher and Irish Artist Colin Davidson

Sarah Bolger - US Ireland Alliance to Honor Stephen Colbert, Carrie Fisher and Irish Artist Colin Davidson at Pre Academy Awards Event at Bad Robot Santa Monica, Academy Awards - Los Angeles, California, United States - Thursday 19th February 2015

Sarah Bolger

The Lazarus Effect Trailer


Zoe is part of a group of scientists with the goal of bringing people back to life. Having being testing the Lazarus Serum (an injectable substance and the instrument of resurrection) on animals and successfully reviving a dog, they start to believe anything is possible - despite accusations that they are immorally 'playing God'. When the dog starts behaving strangely and dangerously, they discover that there's way too much neural activity going on its brain, but before they can investigate further, Zoe is electrocuted to death. Determined not to lose her, her partner Frank injects her and brings her back to life - with terrifying consequences. Zoe appears to have gained paranormal powers and reveals that she has come back from hell. Now the scientists have the job of keeping the dead dead, lest they unleash a destructive evil unto the world.

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Season 4 premiere of ABC's 'Once Upon A Time'

Sarah Bolger - Photos from the El Capitan Theater as many stars attended the Season 4 premiere of ABC's American fairy tale drama 'Once Upon A Time' in Los Angeles, California, United States - Sunday 21st September 2014

The 19th Annual Critics' Choice Awards

Sarah Bolger - The 19th Annual Critics' Choice Awards at The Barker Hangar - Arrivals - Los Angeles, California, United States - Thursday 16th January 2014

Sarah Bolger
Sarah Bolger
Sarah Bolger

15th Annual Warner Bros And InStyle Golden Globe Awards After Party - Arrivals

Sarah Bolger - Celebrities attend the 15th Annual Warner Bros And InStyle Golden Globe Awards After Party - Arrivals held at the Oasis Courtyard at the Beverly Hilton Hotel. - Los Angeles, California, United States - Sunday 12th January 2014

Sarah Bolger
Sarah Bolger
Sarah Bolger

From Up on Poppy Hill Review


Good

From the studio that brought us classics like Spirited Away and Howl's Moving Castle, this animated drama feels unusually low-key and realistic. But while the lack of fantastical elements leaves it somewhat dry, as if it should really be a live-action movie, the animation is still a lavishly detailed feast for the eyes.

It's set in 1963 Japan, where orphaned teen Umi (Bolger) lives with her grandmother (Hendricks) atop a hill overlooking a fishing village. She raises flags every morning as a signal her fisherman father, who died in the Korean War, then heads to school where the topic on everyone's lips is the impending demolition of the ramshackle clubhouse. As the nation prepares for the Tokyo 1964 Olympics, old buildings like this must go, but the students band together to protect it, and Umi teams up with student journalist Shun (Yelchin) to clean up the building and make a plea to the corporate boss (Bridges). Meanwhile, Shun is having a personal crisis: as he begins to fall for Umi, he starts to suspect that they have the same father.

The film never really weaves these two plot strands together, so as Umi and Shun try to save the clubhouse and work out their parentage, each storyline feels like a distraction from the other. But they both raise intriguing questions about the past, present and future in a nation still recovering from WWII. And the beautifully rendered backgrounds bring the period to life with artful detail. On the other hand, the characters are more basic anime shapes, inexpressive and a bit stiff, which makes it difficult to identify with them even when their stories turn extremely emotional.

Continue reading: From Up on Poppy Hill Review

The Moth Diaries Review


Good

There's a terrific sense of menace in this gothic dramatic thriller, which plays on the story's fantasy elements to take us into a teen girl's troubled imagination. It's beautifully shot too, with blood-soaked echoes of Carrie and The Shining in the way the unsettling nastiness is underscored with emotion. Even so, the whole moth motif never really makes much sense, other than as a clumsy metaphor for adolescence.

The events take place in a creepy, isolated girls' school, where 16-year-old Rebecca (Bolger) creates a happy subculture with her best pal Lucy (Gadon) and their party-loving friends. They merrily subvert the rules, keeping the headmistress (Parfitt) on her toes. And the hot new literature teacher Mr Davies (Speedman) gets their pulses racing. Then a new student arrives: Ernessa (Cole) is a loner who reaches out to Lucy for friendship, which upsets Rebecca because she feels like Ernessa is actually preying on her friend. So she sets out to investigate Ernessa's mysterious past, and finds it difficult to tell the difference between reality and her wild imagination.

On the surface, this is a supernatural horror film with ghostly freak-outs, monster-movie grisliness and a rising body count. But is all of this happening in Rebecca's mind? Filmmaker Harron cleverly keeps us off-balance in this sense, letting us see Rebecca's harrowing nightmares and layering her suspicions with the lesbian vampire novel the girls are studying in Mr Davies' class. Stir in hints of teen girl issues like eating disorders, petty jealousies and inappropriate male advances.

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The Spiderwick Chronicles Review


Weak
It's time to declare the search for the next Harry Potter over and give J.K. Rowling and her boy wizard the title of ultimate family fantasy franchise in perpetuity. Perhaps that will keep audiences from suffering through more underwhelming wannabes like The Spiderwick Chronicles. After a year that saw Stardust, The Golden Compass, The Seeker: The Dark is Rising, and the anticipated arrival of another trip to Narnia, no one has yet to top Hogwart's or those who dwell inside its hallowed halls. Spiderwick is no different. It's all a big, implausible CGI payoff, lacking the necessary context to engage its audience.

It's been a tough few weeks for the Grace family. An impending divorce has seen Mom (Mary-Louise Parker) and her three kids -- oldest daughter Mallory (Sarah Bolger) and twin boys Jared and Simon (Freddie Highmore) -- leaving New York and heading to the country, where a crazy aunt's (Joan Plowright) rundown residence awaits them. After hearing a noise in the walls, one of the boys breaks open a secret section, revealing a long forgotten attic room. In it, he finds the Spiderwick Chronicles, a book written by his great uncle (David Strathairn) concerning a magical world beyond reality. In this enchanted domain, fairies and other sprites battle ogres and goblins for the fate of all.

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In America Review


Extraordinary
There is a scene early in In America where a young Irish immigrant girl sticks her head out of the car window she is riding in to soak in the sights and sounds of New York City for the first time. The background music is The Lovin' Spoonful's "Do You Believe in Magic," which not only sums up her arrival in America, but also foreshadows events to come. What follows is a magical and uplifting tale that boosts the human spirit and proves that small miracles do exist.

Written and directed by Jim Sheridan, and based on his own experiences as an Irish immigrant in America, the film chronicles the first year struggles and triumphs of an Irish couple, and their two young daughters. Johnny (Paddy Considine) is out of work and while he struggles to find parts as an actor, his wife Sarah (Samantha Morton) must take a job at a nearby ice cream parlor until she finds employment as a teacher. They must scrounge every penny and sell their car, to pay the rent on their shabby, rundown apartment in a building inhabited mostly by vagrants.

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In America Review


OK

In order to embrace the more fableistic elements of "In America," director Jim Sheridan's fond semi-autobiographical parable about a contemporary family of Irish illegals trying to make good in dilapidated, drug-plagued Hell's Kitchen, it may be necessary to remind yourself that this grown-up film is narrated from a child's point of view.

This will make it possible, for example, not to roll your eyes at the use of The Lovin' Spoonful song "Do You Believe In Magic" over a montage of Manhattan sights reflecting in a car window, behind which are the wide eyes of two excited little girls (sisters Sarah and Emma Bolger) and their the desperate but hopeful parents (Paddy Considine and Samantha Morton).

Remembering that sweet, philosophical 11-year-old Christy (Sarah Bolger) is curious about everything in her new world helps you understand why Sheridan makes her dangerous neighborhood of transvestites, addicts and prostitutes feel more like a non-threatening carnival of curios to be collected through her omnipresent camcorder.

Continue reading: In America Review

Sarah Bolger

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