Samantha Morton

Samantha Morton

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Nick Grimshaw celebrates his birthday at Shoreditch House

Samantha Morton - Nick Grimshaw celebrates his birthday with friends at Shoreditch House - London, United Kingdom - Friday 15th August 2014

The 2013 Glastonbury Festival

Samantha Morton - The 2013 Glastonbury Festival - Day 2 - Celebrity Sightings - Glastonbury, United Kingdom - Saturday 29th June 2013

How Could Fitness Freak Andrew Marr, 50, Have A Stroke?


Sharon Stone Samantha Morton Hugh Hefner

Andrew Marr, the 50-year-old BBC presenter and incredibly keen runner, is recovering in hospital after suffering a stroke. The typical stroke patient is often thought of as being elderly, potentially overweight and a smoker - so what stopped the blood from running to Marr's brain correctly?

As the BBC reports, anyone of any age can suffer from a stroke, with 150,000 people in the UK having a stroke each year - a quarter of them are under 65. Risky lifestyle choices increase the chances of a stroke, including smoking, "carrying too much weight around the belly" and being too fond of alcohol. In his high pressure working environment, it is possible that a sudden peak in blood pressure could have caused Marr's stroke, though this has not be confirmed. There is also mixed evidence around the impact of drinking a lot of coffee as well as irregular heartbeats and blood pools in the heart. 

The BBC presenter is by no means the only high profile individual to suffer a stroke at an early age. The actress Sharon Stone was 44 when she was hospitalised, while Samantha Morton was even younger at 31. Legendary tennis player Rod Laver was 59 when he suffered a stroke, while Playboy magnate Hugh Hefner was in his late fifties. Dr Clare Walton from the Stroke Association said, "I would say that it is a common misconception that this is a condition of just the elderly. A quarter of strokes are in working-age people and children and babies also have strokes."

Cosmopolis Review


OK
Artful, intelligent and wilfully obtuse, Cronenberg uses his skill to hold our interest through this oddity of a film. But it's difficult to engage with such fragmented film, especially when its big themes are hidden in overwritten dialog.

Eric (Pattinson) is a 28-year-old billionaire who wants a haircut. As he climbs into his high-tech limousine, his security chief (Durand) warns about traffic problems because the US President's in Manhattan. En route, Eric continues his routine, meeting his computer expert (Baruchel), theoretician (Morton) and financial advisor (Hampshire), who talks to him during his daily prostate exam.

He also sees his new wife (Gadon) several times, has sex with two women (Binoche and McKenzie), endures an anarchists' riot, gets a pie in the face and confronts a man (Giamatti) who wants to kill him.

Continue reading: Cosmopolis Review

John Carter Review


Excellent
While trailers make this look like an effects-heavy sci-fi mess, the film is actually a rollicking adventure firmly centred on characters rather than the creatures or action. It's an involving, strikingly well-made action drama.

At the end of the American Civil War, John Carter (Kitsch) is in Arizona looking for gold when a strange artefact in a cave transports him to Mars, known locally as Barsoom. Getting used to the lower gravity is one thing, but he's soon captured by green, 15-foot-tall Tharks, who have four limbs plus tusks on the sides of their faces. He earns the respect of leader Tars Tarkas (Dafoe), but when he rescues Helium's Princess Dejah (Collins), he ends up in the middle of the war between red human kingdoms Helium and Zodanga.

Continue reading: John Carter Review

The Messenger Review


Excellent
Another dark, gloomy drama about home life during wartime, this film features some seriously great performances and a theme that will resonate powerfully with thoughtful audiences.

Will (Foster) is just out of military hospital after being injured while serving in Iraq; his relationship with his girlfriend (Malone) is strained, and he's not happy about his new assignment informing families about the deaths of loved ones in the warzone. His mentor for the job is the jaded Tony (Harrelson), who survives by maintaining his distance from the families: "Don't touch the NOK" (next of kin), he tells Will. But Will can't help but reach out to them, and one widow (Morton) makes a particularly strong impression on him.

Continue reading: The Messenger Review

Synecdoche, New York Review


Grim
If it weren't for Charlie Kaufman, the phrase "famous screenwriter" would be an oxymoron. Kaufman has never won an Oscar, and most people, even true movie geeks, probably couldn't pick him out of a police lineup, but he's the only writer in Hollywood whose name is used to promote his movies. From Being John Malkovich and Adaptation to Confessions of a Dangerous Mind and Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind, each of Kaufman's movies is a singular experience -- quirky, affecting, and humorous. Kaufman's renown as a screenwriter even surpasses that of Quentin Tarantino's back in the mid-nineties, when he penned a string of critical and box-office hits that included Reservoir Dogs, True Romance, and Pulp Fiction. Tarantino's real acclaim, however, came as a result of his work behind the camera, not the keyboard. So it's no surprise to find Kaufman making the same transition in Synecdoche, New York -- his debut film as a director.

Synecdoche (sih-NECK-doh-kee) is a word whose meaning is too long to type out here -- and isn't essential to understanding the film, anyway. But it's just the type of word you might throw in the title of your first movie as a director if you wanted to let people know in advance they're in for something offbeat. And Synecdoche, New York is nothing if not determinedly offbeat.

Continue reading: Synecdoche, New York Review

Control Review


OK
Ian Curtis was only 23 when he hung himself in the kitchen of his wife's house on May 18th, 1980 in Manchester, England. His band, Joy Division, had been only responsible for one album, 1979's Unknown Pleasures, while the finishing touches were being put on the second, 1980's Closer. These two pesky albums, along with a single "Love Will Tear Us Apart," would constitute posthumous fandom unlike anyone could have imagined. Both Pleasures and Closer were futuristic pieces of musical intrigue that ignored the nostalgia boasted by the bands that influenced them; Bowie and Iggy Pop sure looked futuristic, but their music was only somewhat forward-looking. Uniformly, Anton Corbijn's Control's ostentatious demeanor belies a somewhat routine ponderance of Curtis' abruptly interrupted popularity.

When we first come across Curtis (a well-researched Sam Riley), he is rushing home with a copy of Aladdin Sane under his arm. Like any experimental teen of that era, he dances and contorts in androgynous bliss while his parents quietly read the paper and prepare dinner in the other room. His quick courtship and marriage to Deborah (the consummate Samantha Morton) quickly sticks him in a go-nowhere house with a go-nowhere job at an employment office. Curtis, like most of England, gets a kick in the knickers when he hears The Sex Pistols for the first time, immediately walking into the street and inquiring whether his friends still need a singer for their band Warsaw.

Continue reading: Control Review

The Libertine Review


Good
It seems that Johnny Depp, who may be our most consistently dazzling actor, will forever be nominated for his lesser roles. No one of major merit nominated him for Jim Jarmusch's Dead Man, Tim Burton's Edward Scissorhands, or Ted Demme's Blow but we sure as hell will nominate him for playing a drunk, silly pirate. How does our strongest actor's most gritty, complex role get snuffed? Hell, even his performance in Ed Wood, his best performance, only scored a Golden Globe nomination. Don't expect his latest in Laurence Dunmore's The Libertine to go anywhere past his British Independent Film Awards nod. There's a better chance of his performance as Willy Wonka getting a nomination 'round these parts.

Depp plays John Wilmot, the second Earl of Rochester, about as depraved and destructive a dissident as there ever was in 17th century England. Besides his duties as an Earl, Wilmot was also a poet, playwright and acting teacher. He married Elizabeth Malet (Rosamund Pike), a woman he tried to kidnap only 2 year prior to marriage, and wrote plays that openly mocked King Charles (a business-as-usual John Malkovich) in his plays and poems, likening him to dildos and limp phalluses. Tell me you wouldn't love to party with this guy. Before he got syphilis and fell apart (literally), he had a short affair with an actress, Elizabeth Barry (the radiant Samantha Morton). Dunmore's film supposes that Wilmot had great emotions for Barry and that her leaving him was what made him die emotionally while syphilis ate away his body.

Continue reading: The Libertine Review

The Libertine Review


Good
It seems that Johnny Depp, who may be our most consistently dazzling actor, will forever be nominated for his lesser roles. No one of major merit nominated him for Jim Jarmusch's Dead Man, Tim Burton's Edward Scissorhands, or Ted Demme's Blow but we sure as hell will nominate him for playing a drunk, silly pirate. How does our strongest actor's most gritty, complex role get snuffed? Hell, even his performance in Ed Wood, his best performance, only scored a Golden Globe nomination. Don't expect his latest in Laurence Dunmore's The Libertine to go anywhere past his British Independent Film Awards nod. There's a better chance of his performance as Willy Wonka getting a nomination 'round these parts.

Depp plays John Wilmot, the second Earl of Rochester, about as depraved and destructive a dissident as there ever was in 17th century England. Besides his duties as an Earl, Wilmot was also a poet, playwright and acting teacher. He married Elizabeth Malet (Rosamund Pike), a woman he tried to kidnap only 2 year prior to marriage, and wrote plays that openly mocked King Charles (a business-as-usual John Malkovich) in his plays and poems, likening him to dildos and limp phalluses. Tell me you wouldn't love to party with this guy. Before he got syphilis and fell apart (literally), he had a short affair with an actress, Elizabeth Barry (the radiant Samantha Morton). Dunmore's film supposes that Wilmot had great emotions for Barry and that her leaving him was what made him die emotionally while syphilis ate away his body.

Continue reading: The Libertine Review

Morvern Callar Review


Good
Let's start with the obvious question: Morvern Callar is the name of a character. The name of a girl, actually. And not in a Lord of the Rings movie.

No, Morvern Callar is a modern-day psychodrama, starring Samantha Morton (never known for picking traditional roles -- Minority Report, Sweet and Lowdown) as the titular Morvern, a Scottish girl who comes to terms with her boyfriend's suicide by simply ignoring the body that's rotting in the hall. Tasked with instructions to use the money in his bank account for a funeral and send his novel off to a publisher in London, Morvern coldly decides to hack up the body and bury it in the moors, use the money for a trip to Spain for her and her pal Lanna (Kathleen McDermott), and sends the novel to a publisher -- under her own name.

Continue reading: Morvern Callar Review

This Is the Sea Review


Weak
Irish Republican Army/Love Story movies have been popular since Michael Collins, and none of them have been any good. Still they keep cranking them out, but I think we've gone to this well about twelve too many times, haven't we? As one reviewer on Amazon.com puts it: "This is the Cheese."
Samantha Morton

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