Sam Waterston

Sam Waterston

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Sam Waterston - Celebrities at SiriusXM to talk about their new movie 'Anesthesia' - New York City, New York, United States - Sunday 10th January 2016

Sam Waterston
Sam Waterston
Sam Waterston

Sam Waterston - 2015 Robert F. Kennedy Ripple Of Hope Awards - Arrivals at Hilton Midtown - New York, New York, United States - Tuesday 8th December 2015

Sam Waterston
Sam Waterston

Sam Waterston - A Concert for our Oceans benefitting Oceana at Wallis Annenberg Center for the Performing Arts - Beverly Hills, California, United States - Tuesday 29th September 2015

Sam Waterston
Sam Waterston
Sam Waterston
Sam Waterston

Sam Waterston - The 2015 Actors Fund Gala held at the New York Marriott Marquis Hotel - Presentation. at New York Marriott Marquis Hotel,, New York Marriott Marquis - New York City, New York, United States - Tuesday 12th May 2015

Sam Waterston
Sam Waterston

Ethan Embry, June Diane Raphael, Lily Tomlin, Jane Fonda and Sam Waterston - A variety of stars were snapped as they attended the Premiere Of Netflix's 'Grace And Frankie' which was held at Regal Cinemas L.A. Live in Los Angeles, California, United States - Wednesday 29th April 2015

Ethan Embry, June Diane Raphael, Lily Tomlin, Jane Fonda and Sam Waterston
Ethan Embry and Sunny Mabrey
Ethan Embry and Sunny Mabrey
Ethan Embry and Sunny Mabrey
Ethan Embry and Sunny Mabrey
Ethan Embry

Warning Sign Review


OK
Sam Waterston in a zombie movie? Though it's dressed up as a meditation on genetic engineering, Warning Sign is still just a zombie movie, sans the death. In this film, the guys just go to sleep before they become bloodthirsty monsters. And this zombification is curable: So the body count is awfully low. Still, Warning Sign has a pedigreed cast and a few fun moments (Kathleen Quinlan getting electrocuted by a mild-mannered scientist who just wants out of the research facility. Reasonably interesting for its era.

The Killing Fields Review


Excellent
People never really got the message about Cambodia that they did about Vietnam. Thanks to movies like The Killing Fields the story can be told, and in fine form. Sam Waterston plays New York Times Sydney Schanberg, who's angrily covering the war from the front lines, but the film (and the Oscar, ultimately) belongs to Haing S. Ngor, who plays Dith Pran, Schanberg's Cambodian translator and assistant. When the shit goes down, Pran can't get out of the country as easily as Schanberg, and the story he tells from the months that followed are epic and heartrending.

A House Divided Review


OK
At least it wasn't hideous... but this Beloved-esque tale of a white plantation owner (Waterston) in Lincoln-era Georgia who has a mixed-race daughter (Beals) by one of his slaves (Hamilton) is so dull it stifles what little energy there is in the story. When the big guy dies, his will -- which leaves almost everything to the daughter -- is contested. Will it stand up against bigotry? Ultimately, it's challenging material made dumb... you know, for Showtime.

Le Divorce Review


Good
Two American blondes discover the joys of Paris - love, heartache, and wearing scarves in a multitude of ways. The blondes are the Walker sisters of California, Roxy (Naomi Watts) and Isabel (Kate Hudson). As Le Divorce opens, Isabel has just arrived in Paris to stay with Roxy and help her out in the late stages of her pregnancy. As luck would have it, Isabel shows up just as Roxy's husband, Charles-Henri (Melvil Poupaud) is walking out on her and their young daughter. The highly moralistic Roxy refuses to give Charles-Henri a divorce, instigating a battle with his extensive, wealthy family, which is lorded over with queenly arrogance by his mother, Suzanne de Persand (Leslie Caron).

The conflict between the Walker and de Persand clans is meant to be only the backdrop for the film's marquee star, Kate Hudson, to strut her naïve self around Paris and fall in lust with Charles-Henri's uncle, the much-older Edgar (Thierry Lhermitte), a suave TV commentator. But it is this familial battleground that quickly becomes the more engaging storyline, especially after Roxy and Isabel's parents (Sam Waterston and Stockard Channing) fly in from California to help out in the negotiations. Waterston and Channing play their roles with effortless grace, establishing that they've been comfortably married for years by using only the slightest of gestures.

Continue reading: Le Divorce Review

Serial Mom Review


Excellent
In famous words: they don't make em like they used to.

When they used to make serial killer movies, the serial killers were guys. When they used to make serial killer movies, the serial killers used an axe or a chainsaw. When they used to make serial killer movies, the serial killers weren't happily married with children.

Continue reading: Serial Mom Review

Savages Review


Good
Forget everything you know about Merchant-Ivory movies. Savages, their first American film, begins in the oddest way imaginable: Black and white footage shows us a group of primitive "mud people" participating in tribal rituals. A German voice-over presumably explains the action, documentary style. There are no subtitles. Suddenly, a croquet ball rolls into their midst. The mud people track where it came from and discover an abandoned British manor. They take up residence.

Overnight the film changes completely: Gone is the narrator and the documentary feel. Now the film is in color, and the mud people are no longer savages. They have miraculously evolved into proper ladies and gentlemen, complete with tuxedos, dinner parties, dancing, and plenty of gossip. The absurdity continues, just in a different way. Title cards appear willy-nilly, in various foreign languages. Parlor room conversations contain the kind of pseudo-intellectual nonsense you'd expect, only these statements are nonsense -- the characters saying them are all primitives!

Continue reading: Savages Review

Capricorn One Review


Good
Hal Holbrook steals the show as a semi-deranged NASA exec who fakes a Mars landing in order to save the space program and his job... even if that means offing O.J. Simpson! Cute for a while, Capricorn One wears thin in its second hour, degenerating into a by-the-books chase movie with the feds after the rogue astronauts and Elliot Gould's reporter after the feds. Telly Savalas's cameo is a scream.

Crimes And Misdemeanors Review


Essential
After Annie Hall, this is categorically Woody Allen's best film. A great ensemble production, Allen's primary tack follows a successful opthamologist (Martin Landau, perfectly cast), who reluctantly decides to murder his mistress when she threatens to blow the whistle to his wife. A parallel story follows a putz documentarian (Allen), who is roped into making a documentary about a boorish sitcom producer (Alan Alda). In the end, everybody loses, but Allen's neurotic outlook on life has never been presented with more clarity.

Hopscotch Review


Good
Often touted as one of the great cat-and-mouse games in movie history, Hopscotch's antics just don't stand up to some of its more expertly crafted contemporaries. Walter Matthau is unforgettable as an ex-CIA agent who's so bored he decides to write a tell-all memoir about his experiences as a spy. This sits poorly with his former bosses, who immediately plot to have him killed. Naturally, he outsmarts them at every turn, but the depth of "clever" twists never rises above identity changes and leaving tape recorders in hotel rooms he's just left. Overrated, unfortunately.

The Great Gatsby Review


Weak
Your high school English teacher was right: F. Scott Fitzgerald's The Great Gatsby really is one of the best American novels of the 20th century, and if you weren't paying attention back in school, you should read it again right away. Will watching the 1974 film version of The Great Gatsby serve as an acceptable shortcut? No. Sadly, the movie treats Fitzgerald's flawless novel as little more than a Jazz-age costume drama, and it goes heavy on the costumes, light on the drama.

Adapted for the screen by Francis Ford Coppola in just three weeks after Truman Capote was fired (so the story goes), Gatsby tells the story of the mysterious and elusive Jay Gatsby (Robert Redford), a superrich businessman who likes to throw wild weekend-long, gin-soaked parties at his sprawling Long Island estate. But who is he? Where did he come from? Rumors abound, but no one seems to know for sure, and as long as the band keeps playing and the booze keeps flowing, no one seems to care all that much.

Continue reading: The Great Gatsby Review

Sam Waterston

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Sam Waterston Movies

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Le Divorce Movie Review

Le Divorce Movie Review

Two American blondes discover the joys of Paris - love, heartache, and wearing scarves in...

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The Great Gatsby Movie Review

The Great Gatsby Movie Review

Your high school English teacher was right: F. Scott Fitzgerald's The Great Gatsby really is...

The Journey of August King Movie Review

The Journey of August King Movie Review

Now, nothin' could be finer than to be in Carolina... unless'n your a slave on...

Le Divorce Movie Review

Le Divorce Movie Review

The further away director James Ivory and producer Ishmael Merchant get from their trademarked aristocratic...

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