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Sam Rockwell - Sam Rockwell leaves Los Angeles International Airport - Los Angeles, California, United States - Monday 6th October 2014

Sam Rockwell
Sam Rockwell
Sam Rockwell
Sam Rockwell
Sam Rockwell
Sam Rockwell

David Bar Katz and Sam Rockwell - Opening night of 'This Is Our Youth' at the Cort Theatre - Arrivals - New York, New York, United States - Friday 12th September 2014

David Bar Katz and Sam Rockwell

Sam Rockwell and Kiera Knightley - Celebrities were photographed at the premiere of new RomCom 'Laggies' at the Toronto International Film Festival in Toronto, Canada - Thursday 11th September 2014

Sam Rockwell and Kiera Knightley
Sam Rockwell
Sam Rockwell
Sam Rockwell

Sam Rockwell - Toronto International Film Festival - Laggies - Photocall - Toronto, Canada - Wednesday 10th September 2014

Sam Rockwell
Sam Rockwell

Amanda Peet, Molly Shannon, Felicity Huffman, Clark Gregg, William H. Macy and Sam Rockwell - "Trust Me" - Los Angeles Premiere - Hollywood, California, United States - Friday 23rd May 2014

Amanda Peet, Molly Shannon, Felicity Huffman, Clark Gregg, William H. Macy and Sam Rockwell
Amanda Peet
Brian Gattas, Niecy Nash, Amanda Peet, Molly Shannon, Felicity Huffman, Clark Gregg, William H. Macy, Sam Rockwell and Saxon Sharbino
Amanda Peet
Brian Gattas, Niecy Nash, Amanda Peet, Molly Shannon, Felicity Huffman, Clark Gregg, William H. Macy, Sam Rockwell and Saxon Sharbino
Amanda Peet

Ivan Martin, Sam Rockwell, Marisa Tomei and Michael Godere - 2014 Tribeca Film Festival - "Loitering With Intent" Premiere -Red Carpet Arrivals - Manhattan, New York, United States - Saturday 19th April 2014

Ivan Martin, Sam Rockwell, Marisa Tomei and Michael Godere
Sam Rockwell
Sam Rockwell
Marisa Tomei and Sam Rockwell
Brian Geraghty, Isabelle Mcnally, Adam Rapp, Ivan Martin, Marisa Tomei, Sam Rockwell and Michael Godere
Sam Rockwell

Marisa Tomei, Ivan Martin, writer Michael Godere, Adam Rapp, Isabelle McNally, Bryan Geraphty and Sam Rockwell - 'Loitering With Intent' premiere at the Tribeca Film Festival - Arrivals - New York, New York, United States - Friday 18th April 2014

Marisa Tomei, Ivan Martin, Writer Michael Godere, Adam Rapp, Isabelle Mcnally, Bryan Geraphty and Sam Rockwell
Marisa Tomei, Ivan Martin, Writer Michael Godere, Adam Rapp, Isabelle Mcnally, Bryan Geraphty and Sam Rockwell
Marisa Tomei, Ivan Martin, Writer Michael Godere, Adam Rapp, Isabelle Mcnally, Bryan Geraphty and Sam Rockwell
Marisa Tomei, Ivan Martin, Writer Michael Godere, Adam Rapp, Isabelle Mcnally, Bryan Geraphty and Sam Rockwell
Marisa Tomei, Ivan Martin, Writer Michael Godere, Adam Rapp, Isabelle Mcnally, Bryan Geraphty and Sam Rockwell

Yul Vazquez, Oscar Isaac and Sam Rockwell - Opening night of The Library at the Public Theater - Arrivals. - New York, New York, United States - Tuesday 15th April 2014

Yul Vazquez, Oscar Isaac and Sam Rockwell
Yul Vazquez

Allison Janney and Sam Rockwell - New York Premiere of 'The Way, Way Back' at AMC Loews Lincoln Square - New York City, NY, United States - Wednesday 26th June 2013

Allison Janney and Sam Rockwell
Allison Janney
Allison Janney
Allison Janney
Steve Carell, Annasophia Robb, Allison Janney, Liam James and Toni Collette

Sam Rockwell - New York Premiere of 'The Way, Way Back' - Arrivals - Manhattan, NY, United States - Thursday 27th June 2013

Sam Rockwell

Sam Rockwell - Opening night of 'Reasons To Be Happy' at the Lucille Lortel Theatre - Arrivals - New York City, NY, United States - Tuesday 11th June 2013

Sam Rockwell
Sam Rockwell
Sam Rockwell
Sam Rockwell

A Week In Movies: Iron Man 3 Goes Global, Thor: The Dark World Trailer Strikes And Emma Roberts Stuns In Blue


Robert Downey Jr Gwyneth Paltrow Chris Hemsworth Tom Hiddleston Ryan Reynolds Jeff Bridges Toni Collette Steve Carell Sam Rockwell Robert Redford Emma Roberts James Franco

Iron Man 3

The big news in cinemas globally is the release of Iron Man 3, which doesn't open in the USA until next week. But audiences around the world are already watching Robert Downey Jr and Gwyneth Paltrow reprise their roles in the Marvel franchise, which will no doubt lead box office charts everywhere for a few weeks at least.

Meanwhile, we got our first glimpse of Iron Man's fellow Avenger Thor with the trailer for The Dark World, which opens late this summer. Chris Hemsworth is back as the Norse god, this time teaming up with his mischievous brother Loki (Tom Hiddleston) instead of fighting him. Natalie Portman is also back for what looks like a seriously epic blockbuster. 

Continue reading: A Week In Movies: Iron Man 3 Goes Global, Thor: The Dark World Trailer Strikes And Emma Roberts Stuns In Blue

Video - Peter Dinklage, Evan Rachel Wood And Busy Philipps Appear At 'A Case Of You' Premiere At The Tribeca Film Festival


The arrivals for the premiere 'A Case of You' at the 2013 Tribeca Film Festival in New York seemed to be expecting some new arrivals as three of the women working on the movie are heavily pregnant. One of the stars, Evan Rachel Wood ('Thirteen'), showed off her bump in a floral Dolce & Gabbana maxi dress while another actress, Busy Philipps ('Cougar Town'), was looking quite far on in a black jumpsuit. The director herself, Kat Coiro ('L!fe Happens'), was snapped gleefully clutching her own bump with her husband, Rhys Coiro, in tow.

Continue: Video - Peter Dinklage, Evan Rachel Wood And Busy Philipps Appear At 'A Case Of You' Premiere At The Tribeca Film Festival

The Way, Way Back Trailer


Duncan is a 14-year-old boy struggling to fit in anywhere and dealing with all the problems that most teenagers are forced to deal with at some stage. His mother Pam has a new boyfriend, Trent, who happens to be a jerk with a keen interest in humiliating Duncan at every opportunity. As the summer nears, the family embark on a vacation at Trent's beach house where he meets their new neighbour's daughter Susanna who, far from seeing him as a socially awkward and embarrassing individual, warms to Duncan immediately. He also meets the unprofessional and extroverted manager of the Water Wizz water park, Owen, who offers him a job and some excitement on his otherwise uninteresting vacation and subsequently helps him grow in confidence and self-belief. 

Continue: The Way, Way Back Trailer

Sam Rockwell - Screening of 'A Case of You' during the 2013 Tribeca Film Festival at BMCC Tribeca PAC - Arrivals - New York, United States - Sunday 21st April 2013

Sam Rockwell
Sam Rockwell
Sam Rockwell
Sam Rockwell
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Sam Rockwell

Sam Rockwell - 'Trust Me' World Premiere at the 2013 Tribeca Film Festival - New York, NY, United States - Saturday 20th April 2013

Sam Rockwell
Sam Rockwell
Sam Rockwell

Sam Rockwell - 2013 Tribeca Film Festival - 'Trust Me' premiere - Arrivals - New York City, NY, United States - Saturday 20th April 2013

Sam Rockwell
Sam Rockwell
Sam Rockwell
Sam Rockwell
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Sam Rockwell

Leslie Bibb and Sam Rockwell - 2013 Film Independent Spirit Awards at Santa Monica Beach - Arrivals - Santa Monica, CA, United States - Saturday 23rd February 2013

Leslie Bibb and Sam Rockwell
Leslie Bibb
Leslie Bibb
Leslie Bibb and Sam Rockwell
Leslie Bibb and Sam Rockwell
Leslie Bibb

Sam Rockwell - Celebrities In Utah Salt Lake City Utah United States Saturday 19th January 2013

Sam Rockwell

Yul Vazquez; Sam Rockwell LAByrinth Theater Company Celebrity Charades 2013 Benefit Gala - Arrivals Featuring: Yul Vazquez, Sam Rockwell Where: New York City, United States When: 14 Jan 2013

Yul Vazquez, Sam Rockwell and Labyrinth Theater Company Celebrity Charades
Daphne Rubin-vega, Yul Vazquez, Rosie Perez, S. Epatha Merkenson and Labyrinth Theater Company Celebrity Charades
Josh Charles, Yul Vazquez and Labyrinth Theater Company Celebrity Charades
Daphne Rubin-vega, Yul Vazquez, Rosie Perez and Labyrinth Theater Company Celebrity Charades
Yul Vazquez and Bobby Cannavale
Yul Vazquez and Labyrinth Theater Company Celebrity Charades

Graham Broadbent, Sam Rockwell and Martin Mcdonagh Wednesday 28th November 2012 Graham Broadbent, Sam Rockwell, Martin McDonagh

Graham Broadbent, Sam Rockwell and Martin Mcdonagh

Tracie Thoms, Sam Rockwell, Fisher Stevens, Mickey Sumner, Billy Crudup, Eddie Kaye Thomas, Zosia Mamet, Gina Gershon, Emmanuelle Chriqui, Rosie Perez and Jack McBrayer - Tracie Thoms, Sam Rockwell, Fisher Stevens, Mickey Sumner, Billy Crudup, Eddie Kaye Thomas, Zosia Mamet, Gina Gershon, Emmanuelle Chriqui, Rosie Perez and Jack McBrayer Tuesday 13th November 2012 Curtain Call for Mont Blanc’s 12th Annual production of The 24 Hour Plays, a benefit for Urban Arts Partnership, held at the American Airlines Theatre.

Tracie Thoms, Sam Rockwell, Fisher Stevens, Mickey Sumner, Billy Crudup, Eddie Kaye Thomas, Zosia Mamet, Gina Gershon, Emmanuelle Chriqui, Rosie Perez and Jack Mcbrayer
Vanessa Hudgens, Seth Green, Diane Neal, Tracie Thoms, Taran Killam, Sam Rockwell and Fisher Stevens
Tracie Thoms and Gabourey Sidibe
Maura Tierney, Eisa Davis, Vanessa Hudgens, Diane Neal, Seth Green, Taran Killam and Tracie Thoms
Fisher Stevens, Mickey Sumner, Seth Green and Tracie Thoms

Billy Crudup, Sam Rockwell and Justin Long - Billy Crudup, Sam Rockwell and Justin Long Monday 12th November 2012 attending the After Party for Mont Blanc's 12th Annual production of The 24 Hour Plays, a benefit for Urban Arts Partnership, held at B.B. King’s night club

Billy Crudup, Sam Rockwell and Justin Long

Christopher Walken, Honey Boo Boo – Is This The World’s Weirdest Pairing?


Christopher Walken Sam Rockwell Colin Farrell Alana Thompson

Christopher Walken’s Honey Boo Boo reading has caused a bit of a stir.

Stars of the new comedy Seven Psychopaths Christopher Walken, Colin Farrell and Sam Rockwell have brought a whole new dimension to the latest reality star to take America by storm, Honey Boo Boo.

Whilst filming a press junket interview for the actor’s new film, the trio of stars were asked to read lines from a mock-audition for the Honey Boo Boo Movie, with all exceeding in their roles. The show, which airs on The Learning Channel, teaches viewers how a Georgian family go about their daily lives and struggles, with the actors reciting some awe-inspiring lines lifted directly from the show including: “My momma has told me in the past that if you fart 12-15 times a day, you could lose a lot of weight, so I think I'm gonna lose a lot of weight.”

Continue reading: Christopher Walken, Honey Boo Boo – Is This The World’s Weirdest Pairing?

Seven Psychopaths Trailer


Marty is a budding screenwriter in LA with hopes of completing his major screenplay 'Seven Psychopaths' but involuntarily gets mixed up in his friends Hans and Billy's career of dog kidnapping; a way of earning money that involves stealing people's pet pooches and returning them some days later to claim the reward. Billy is an actor and Marty's best friend who tries desperately to keep him safe when he is almost killed after Billy and Hans steal the much-loved Shih Tzu of unhinged gangster, Charlie; a man whose fury and devastation at losing his dog is enough drive to execute whoever he thinks is involved. Hans is religious with a violent past but now recognises non-violence as a better way to live. However, he, Billy and Marty will struggle avoiding violence at the hands of Charlie especially as they choose to ignore their worried and annoyed girlfriends' suggestions to return the dog.

'Seven Psychopaths' is a wonderful crime comedy that spoofs the trend of all the serious gangster movies that have been released this year. Directed, written and produced by the Oscar winning Martin Mcdonagh ('In Bruges', 'Six Shooter'), this star-studded flick is definitely one for dog lovers and gangster film lovers alike. It is scheduled for release in the UK this winter on December 7th 2012.

Starring: Sam Rockwell, Colin Farrell, Christopher Walken, Woody Harrelson, Abbie Cornish, Olga Kurylenko, Zeljko Ivanek, Tom Waits, Helena Mattsson, Gabourey Sidibe, Kevin Corrigan, Brendan Sexton III, Sandy Martin and Ronnie Gene Blevins.

A Week In Movies Featuring: Joseph Gordon-Levitt, Anna Kendrick, Daniel Day Lewis, Sam Rockwell, Woody Harrelson And Much More!


The big movie news this week is that Colin Firth, Geoffrey Rush, Helena Bonham Carter and director Tom Hooper will all be back for a sequel to The King's Speech, set during the Blitz. The film centres on the different experiences of the royals and the speech therapist's family as the Germans drop bombs on London.

 

Joseph Gordon Levitt Looper Still

After his pivotal role in The Dark Knight Rises, Joseph Gordon-Levitt is back on our screens this week in the time travel hitman thriller Looper, in which he plays a 30-years-younger version of Bruce Willis. The smart, thoughtful action movie reunites Gordon-Levitt with Brick writer-director Rian Johnson.

Continue reading: A Week In Movies Featuring: Joseph Gordon-Levitt, Anna Kendrick, Daniel Day Lewis, Sam Rockwell, Woody Harrelson And Much More!

Conviction Review


Very Good
An extremely strong true story is told with emotion and skill, but never really rises above the level of a decent TV movie. This is perhaps due to unambitious writing, which never quite gives us an engaging point of view.

After a tough childhood in rural Massachusetts, Betty Anne Waters (Swank) has always been very close to her hot-headed brother Kenny (Rockwell). So when he's arrested for a vicious murder, she refuses to believe that he's guilty. After all of the appeals fail, she enrols in law school as a mature student and, with the help of fellow lawyer Abra (Driver) and evidence expert Barry (Gallagher), seeks to challenge Kenny's conviction with new DNA evidence. But this isn't nearly as simple as it sounds.

Continue reading: Conviction Review

Cowboys & Aliens Trailer


Jake Lonergan is a wanted criminal but when he awakes in the middle of nowhere with no memory of his past, he enters the town of Absolution, one of the places that has imposed a bounty Lonergan's capture by Colonel Woodrow Dolarhyde, a man who governs with an iron fist.

Continue: Cowboys & Aliens Trailer

Iron Man 2 Review


Very Good
Cast and crew expand this franchise in just about every direction with this hugely enjoyable sequel. It's bigger, louder, funnier, darker and more emotional than before. So much so that you hardly notice how thin and choppy the plot is.

After saving the world, cocky arms-maker Tony Stark (Downey) is riding on his laurels and fending off attacks from his smarmy competitor (Rockwell) and a pushy senator (Shandling). Then a mysterious Russian (Rourke) nearly kills him with technology that matches his own. But Tony has another secret problem: his mechanical heart is killing him. He won't confide in his faithful assistant Pepper (Paltrow) or his best pal Rhodes (Cheadle), but he prepares to leave everything to them. Then the shady Nick Fury (Jackson) offers him another option.

Continue reading: Iron Man 2 Review

Everybody's Fine Review


OK
Cloying sentimentality threatens to overwhelm this quiet character study about a widower trying to reconnect with his children. Despite the solid acting and wrenching drama, this over-slick film never connects emotionally.

Frank Goode (DeNiro) is rattling around his empty house after his wife dies.

His kids are all grown and out on their own, and none of them can be bothered to keep in touch. When they all cancel coming to a family dinner, Frank decides to pay them surprise visits, taking a road trip to see artist David (Lysy) in New York, ad exec Amy (Beckinsale) in Chicago, musician Robert (Rockwell) in Denver and dancer Rosie (Barrymore) in Las Vegas. But none of their lives are quite what he's been led to expect.

Continue reading: Everybody's Fine Review

Everybody's Fine Trailer


Watch the trailer for Everybody's Fine

Continue: Everybody's Fine Trailer

Moon Review


Excellent
With a remarkable eye for detail, this low-key sci-fi thriller really gets under the skin as it probes the nature of humanity while keeping us on the edge of our seats. In the near future, Sam (Rockwell) is nearing the end of his three-year stint at a mining station on the dark side of the moon and looking forward to going home to his wife and daughter (McElligott and Scodelario). His only company is the computer Gerty (voiced by Spacey). But after an accident on the lunar surface, he has the surreal experience of meeting himself in the station. Together, the two Sams try to figure out what's going on and what'll happen when the rescue team arrives to find two of them.

The film has heavy shadings of three space classics: 2001, Solaris and Silent Running, both in the way it's designed and in its quiet examination of human nature. When reality starts slipping from his grasp, Sam faces an existential crisis and must figure out who he is regardless of what anyone has told him.

And this is what gives the film its kick, even when the plot itself becomes a bit subtle or vague.

Continue reading: Moon Review

Moon Review


Good
Sam Rockwell plays, ostensibly, the only character in Moon, the debut film from Duncan Jones. His role is that of Sam Bell, a meager laborer at an energy-mining colony on the moon who, lonesome and remote, engineers the extraction of Helium-3, the world's new-fangled energy resource. His only friend: a computer named Gerty which is fitted with emoticons and is voiced by Kevin Spacey. My very real hope is that when all this space craziness becomes real, we make robots and droids a bit livelier than all these HAL scions.

Sam has a wife and a new kid back on Earth and a pair of condescending, endlessly reassuring bosses who send him bits of info every once in awhile. When he runs full-barrel into a harvesting machine and knocks himself unconscious, he awakens with a clear memory of everything up until the accident. Gerty, who has all the dings, scuff marks, and stains one would expect of a workplace droid, shepherds Sam back to working condition like a doting mother but refuses to let him leave the compound. It takes a few days for Sam to outsmart Gerty and get out to the harvester, where he finds an astronaut barely breathing. The helmet is lifted and he finds a clone of himself, bearded and bloodied.

Continue reading: Moon Review

Frost/Nixon Trailer


Watch the trailer for Frost/Nixon

Continue: Frost/Nixon Trailer

Moon Trailer


Watch the trailer for Moon.

Continue: Moon Trailer

Frost/Nixon Review


Essential
If there's a single misstep in Ron Howard's expertly calibrated Frost/Nixon, it eluded me.

Howard's spellbinding adaptation of Peter Morgan's Tony-nominated stage drama understands the politics that manipulate Washington and Hollywood. It comprehends how many interviews are won and lost long before the Q&A begins. It figures out the best way to transition an airtight theatrical production to the roomier silver screen (giving the elements plenty of room to breathe). And -- most importantly -- it illustrates the intimidating power of television, which creates and destroys legacies on a daily basis.

Continue reading: Frost/Nixon Review

Choke Review


OK
Let's face it: No one thought Fight Club would be anything other than another flash of David Fincher directorial determination when it first came out. Critics and audiences were not enamored with the machismo and mayhem epic, even with stars Edward Norton and Brad Pitt in the lead. No, it took a few years for the cinematic scales to fall from everyone's eyes, turning a cult flick into a classic. Perhaps actor turned auteur Clark Gregg is hoping for the same time-aided appreciation. His interpretation of Club author Chuck Palahniuk's novel Choke is equally quirky and unsettled. One senses, however, no future re-evaluation for this uneven effort.

Since leaving medical school, sex addict Victor Mancini (Sam Rockwell) has worked tirelessly to keep his mentally deranged mother (Anjelica Huston) in a private nursing home. By day, he's a "historical recreationist" at a local colonial village. By night, he travels to various restaurants around town and pretends to choke. Once saved, he hits up his good Samaritan marks for any and all kinds of financial assistance. Desperate to learn who his father is, Victor teams up with a new doctor named Paige Marshall (Kelly Macdonald) to decipher his mother's memories, as well as translate an old diary which may provide some clues. Of course, in between consultations, it's nothing but fornication and copulation.

Continue reading: Choke Review

Snow Angels Review


Good
There are about two or three different films fighting for control of the screen during David Gordon Green's powerful but flawed Snow Angels, and in the end none of them win. An adaptation by Green (All the Real Girls) from the novel by Stewart O'Nan, the film is at its core a dispiriting domestic drama in which single mother and waitress Annie (Kate Beckinsale) is trying to raise her daughter and deal with the encroaching return of her ex-husband, Glenn (Sam Rockwell), a onetime suicide case and drunk who has now found Jesus and wants back into Annie's life. Set to swirling all around this ugly and embittered core are several stories that never quite seem to plug into each other dramatically, no matter that their characters are closely interrelated via love, friendship, family, and the shockingly violent turn everything takes in the closing minutes.

Set in a small and snowbound Pennsylvania town, Snow Angels at the very least looks like a town from reality, as opposed to the idyllic villages filmmakers create when they want to tell moral fables about violence and family (see Reservation Road, In the Bedroom, and so on). It starts with a high school marching band practicing in the cold, performing in a lackluster fashion that brings about a hilariously stern lecture from their instructor (played to icy perfection by Tom Noonan). Then a pair of gunshots are heard cracking through the cold air and the film flashes back to "weeks earlier."

Continue reading: Snow Angels Review

Joshua (2007) Review


Good
Shot in wide-angled lens, the apartment in which the Cairn family resides could be any market-trading, publisher-dictating, money-horny Manhattanite's family bungalow. The rooms have respectably high ceilings, there's space for a big ol' piano, and there's even enough room for one of those nifty new fridges with enough compartments to be able to fit tons of leftovers from the Tribeca Grill. The halls look shadowy, and in the daytime the sun comes in basically as a vomit-colored fog. Only in an apartment with this sort of eerie ambience could a so-creepy-maybe-he's-the-devil child like Joshua Cairn be brought up by his insanely yuppie parents.

Director George Ratliff's shift into narrative cinema isn't completely unlike his hair-raising Trinity Church documentary Hell House. Though intriguingly unexplored, the idea of religious fundamentalism gets breached in a scene when the young Joshua (Jacob Kagon) takes a trip to church with his grandmother (Celia Weston). He later announces that he is prepared to accept Christ; his mother (Vera Farmiga) responds by reminding her mother-in-law and Joshua that she is a "big, fat Jew". The father (Sam Rockwell) takes his son's eccentricities and disturbing statements ("you don't have to love me") with a shambling good nature, only truly breaking down when the family dog dies. In a wicked twist, Ratliff only hints at the father's possible infidelity and revels in the lame AM radio rock he sings as he enters his apartment palace.

Continue reading: Joshua (2007) Review

The Green Mile Review


Excellent
The Green Mile? Let's talk about 26 miles. The length of a marathon. Start the race and the movie together: The race would long be over before the film. The winner would be at home, taking a nap. Yes, The Green Mile is three hours long.

Not that long movies have never been successful, and not that The Green Mile is bad. You might even think a long movie is required here. Pulled from Stephen King's acclaimed series of six books by the same name, King returns to the kind of work he was doing in The Shawshank Redemption (based on a short story of his), the kind that seems to perform the best, away from splatter and gore, and into the minds of the strangest of characters.

Continue reading: The Green Mile Review

Safe Men Review


Very Good
See what Sam Rockwell and Steve Zahn looked like before they both let their hair go insane. This very little-known (and just plain little) indie comedy is extremely witty and often perverse. Even without the humor, the film is worth seeking out to see all the other roles by up-and-comers (at least at the time), including Paul Giamatti and Mark Ruffalo. The nutty premise involves two wannabe singers (Rockwell and Zahn) who are mistaken for safecrackers and threatened into doing a series of safecracking jobs. Not a single serious moment ensues. Excellent.

Matchstick Men Review


Excellent
Matchstick Men is an uncharacteristic departure for director Ridley Scott. After all, who didn't think the man was utterly without a sense of humor or even a soul of after the hopelessly depressing Gladiator and Black Hawk Down?

But even Scott proves that he can't suppress his frosted side forever, thanks to this spirited and undeniably sweet look at the con game spliced with a family drama -- his best work in years.

Continue reading: Matchstick Men Review

Last Exit To Brooklyn Review


Good
A little meandering, a little lost, and a lot grim, Uli Edel's cult classic tells a handful of stories against the backdrop of World War II and massive corruption in New York City. The centerpiece of the story is a hooker/conwoman (Jennifer Jason Leigh in an infamous role) who falls in love with one of her customers, an army guy who's about to ship out. Her personal struggle with detachment and her horrific past (and inevitable future) make the rest of the film -- which features rioting and a somewhat out of place vignette about one character's hidden homosexuality -- fade away.

The Green Mile Review


Excellent
The Green Mile? Let's talk about 26 miles. The length of a marathon. Start the race and the movie together: The race would long be over before the film. The winner would be at home, taking a nap. Yes, The Green Mile is three hours long.

Not that long movies have never been successful, and not that The Green Mile is bad. You might even think a long movie is required here. Pulled from Stephen King's acclaimed series of six books by the same name, King returns to the kind of work he was doing in The Shawshank Redemption (based on a short story of his), the kind that seems to perform the best, away from splatter and gore, and into the minds of the strangest of characters.

Continue reading: The Green Mile Review

Light Sleeper Review


Very Good
Light Sleeper feels like a serious '80s film, though it was made all the way in 1992. It's a relic of the drug era, filled with a soulful performance from WIllem Dafoe (a conflicted upper-class dealer who wants to get out of the business), a synthesizer score, and virtually no scenes set during the day. Susan Sarandon and Dana Delany also look straight outta 1983, with a bouffant hairdo and a close-cut Jane Wiedlin cut, respectively. As for the film, it's more hit than miss, and Dafoe's earnest portrayal carries the movie through its rockier, less sensical parts. Worth a look.

Charlie's Angels Review


Weak
The spy game is up. You can thank Charlie's Angels -- the movie -- for that.

When did banality and pandering become okay? Just steal from Hong Kong, The Matrix, and a kitschy TV show from the mid-1970s and that's a movie? Charlie's Angels is one of the worst examples of action film homogeneity and shameless duplicity in any film I've seen in ages.

Continue reading: Charlie's Angels Review

Lawn Dogs Review


Good
File this one under bizarre. Extremely strange film masked behind a setting of recently developed suburbia, where a 10 year old girl befriends the local lawnmower man/country bumpkin. Disturbing look at classist society in America, but a tough, tough nut to crack: Those who want to see Mischa Barton peeing on a car need look no further. And I still don't know what a Lawn Dog is.

The Hitchhiker's Guide To The Galaxy Review


Very Good
Tolkein geeks have The Lord of the Rings. I have The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy. One of my most beloved book series as a youth (I still carry a towel in my trunk thanks to its advice), I even sat through (and enjoyed) the cheesy BBC miniseries made from the novels. So just so you know what you're getting into with this review: I'm a self-confessed overgrown fanboy on this one.

Decades in the making, Guide has been embroiled in controversy since the very beginning. The most recent round of complaints have covered pretty much the entire film, from casting (Mos Def taking a role commonly envisioned as a sort of British dandy) to directing (Garth Jennings is a music video veteran), to choice of writer Karey Kirkpatrick (a kiddie flick screenwriter best known for Chicken Run but also the writer of disastrous flicks The Little Vampire and Honey, We Shrunk Ourselves). Out of this, we've all been promised, genius would spring.

Continue reading: The Hitchhiker's Guide To The Galaxy Review

Welcome To Collinwood Review


Excellent
Among the ever-impressive list of projects undertaken by Steven Soderbergh and George Clooney's Section Eight production group (Ocean's Eleven, this year's Insomnia), the ironically titled Welcome to Collinwood is one of the best. Anthony and Joe Russo's lovable crime comedy, which boasts a talented comic cast -- including Clooney himself, in a small but invaluable role -- is the finest debut by a creative team since the Wachowski brothers (The Matrix) made Bound.

Basing their premiere feature on the little-seen Italian comedy Big Deal on Madonna Street (1958), the writing, directing Russos set their film -- a finely tuned, brilliantly designed, screwball romp -- in the Ohio city of the title, which they've drawn as decrepit, to say the least. Collinwood is painted as low rent, low wage, and low class, where every sidewalk square is cracked and so are the people that walk on them.

Continue reading: Welcome To Collinwood Review

Heist Review


Good
David Mamet is a good director. Mamet's an even better screenwriter and playwright. The guy's authored some of the best film and theatre works in the past decade -- The Verdict, House of Games, Wag the Dog, State and Main, and the guy even won a Pulitzer Prize for his play Glengarry Glen Ross. With that said, it's such a shame that his latest crime caper, Heist, falls apart by employing too many of the well-known devices of a Mamet production -- double-crossing femmes fatale, overtly memorable characters, and deceptive plot lines.

But movies like The Spanish Prisoner, Things Change, and The Winslow Boy display a roundness to Mamet's innate abilities. And it's almost a crime to witness how all of that goes awry in his latest film, Heist.

Continue reading: Heist Review

Safe Men Review


Very Good
See what Sam Rockwell and Steve Zahn looked like before they both let their hair go insane. This very little-known (and just plain little) indie comedy is extremely witty and often perverse. Even without the humor, the film is worth seeking out to see all the other roles by up-and-comers (at least at the time), including Paul Giamatti and Mark Ruffalo. The nutty premise involves two wannabe singers (Rockwell and Zahn) who are mistaken for safecrackers and threatened into doing a series of safecracking jobs. Not a single serious moment ensues. Excellent.

Jerry & Tom Review


Good
Two hitmen look back on their lives while holding down day jobs as used car salesmen. Hooked yet? Indeed, this is one of the stranger films to come along lately, and it's obvious it didn't click with audiences. Cue Showtime to pick it up without a theatrical release. Bizarre structure and a we-mighta-killed-celebrity-[fill in the blank] makes for an interesting couple of hours, but that's about it.

Piccadilly Jim Review


Weak
A rather hysterical oddity that can't decide what era it's set in or what mood to play, Piccadilly Jim just chucks it all at the screen and hopes that some wit will come through and generate some laughs. Fortunately for the audience, some of it does - unfortunately for the film, not nearly enough.

Based on P.G. Wodehouse's novel, the film concerns the exploits of one Jim Crocker (Sam Rockwell), a young wastrel whose social-climbing American mother (Allison Janney, sharp as a tack) has forced him and his father (Tom Wilkinson), a failed British actor, to live in London and try and impress the swells there. She does this just to tick off her competitive sister, Nesta (Brenda Blethyn), a fact not wasted on the men of the family. Spoiling his mother's plans is Jim's penchant to booze it up all over town, getting into fistfights and leaving flappers scattered about the house and in his bed. Jim decides to ostensibly reform his wayward ways when he meets Nesta's step-niece Anne (Frances O'Connor), who won't have anything to do with him unless he pretends to be someone else - Jim once wrote a gossip column under the name "Piccadilly Jim", and once someone else writing the column (he hasn't worked on it for years) gave a negative review to a collection of Anne's poems. Jim thusly does the only sensible thing a fellow could do: He pretends to be a teetotaler Christian named Algernon Bayliss. Somehow, along the way, a German spy and some scientific secrets come into play, but one would be well-served to not wonder how.

Continue reading: Piccadilly Jim Review

The Hitchhiker's Guide To The Galaxy Review


Good
Imagine the madcap sensibilities of Monty Python appliedto science fiction and you'll begin to have an inkling of the whimsicallyeccentric humor of "The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy," anenormously successful cult-comedy franchise of which a new feature filmis only the latest incarnation.

The story of Arthur Dent (Martin Freeman), a nebbish Englishmansaved from the demolition of Earth (to make way for a hyperspace bypass)by an alien he'd hitherto thought was a pal from Gilford, "Hitchhiker'sGuide" follows his very reluctant and frequently absurd adventuresin space.

In the first 15 minutes alone, Arthur and Ford Prefect(Mos Def) are jettisoned from one of the ships that blew up the Earth (afterbeaming aboard surreptitiously, being captured and tortured with alienpoetry), then against all odds they're rescued from the vacuum of spaceseconds later by a passing vessel with a warp drive designed to exploitjust such unlikelihoods -- the Infinite Improbability Drive.

Onboard Arthur is improbably reunited with Trish McMillan(Zooey Deschanel), a girl he fell for at a party some months before, onlyto see her run off with Zaphod Bebblebox (Sam Rockwell), a guy who claimedto be from another planet. Zaphod, even more improbably, turns out to beFord's whacked-out semi-cousin (they share three of the same mothers) whobecame president of the galaxy just so he'd have the necessary clearanceto steal this very ship (because he thought it was cool).

Continue reading: The Hitchhiker's Guide To The Galaxy Review

Welcome To Collinwood Review


OK

The entire, very talented cast of the caper comedy "Welcome to Collinwood" is clearly having a good time playing criminal washouts who know more about their own local-crook jargon than they do about breaking and entering. But you get the feeling watching it that having a good time took precedence over making anything more than an insubstantial romp designed to entertain themselves.

Amusing but otherwise forgettable, the flick stars Luis Guzman (also in this week's "Punch-Drunk Love") as an imprisoned petty thief who hears about a supposed dream heist opportunity from a lifer he's serving time with and says to himself, "This could be my Belini!" But he needs a Melinski to take the fall and someone who can pull a Krasner at the Shylock's office they'll break into, so the job doesn't turn into a real kaputchnick.

But in the process of trying to line up a patsy, his girlfriend on the outside (Patricia Clarkson) ends up with half a dozen hapless partners instead -- including a hopelessly amateur boxer (Sam Rockwell), an unemployed photographer (William H. Macy) who carts his infant son everywhere he goes because his can't afford his wife's bail, a frail old thief (Michael Jeter) who can't complete a sentence without pausing for breath, a dubiously "expert" safe-cracker in a wheelchair (George Clooney) who is a little cracked himself, and a couple more small-time hustlers (Isaiah Washington and Andrew Davoli).With stars such as these employing the cheeky comic instincts they've honed, often together, in flicks by David Mamet and/or Steven Soderbergh (who produced this picture with Clooney), the frivolity is contagious, even if the plot and the gags are, more often than not, obvious, broad and overused.

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Galaxy Quest Review


Weak

"Galaxy Quest" was birthed from a ripe comedy premise: The leaders of a tyrannized race of pacifist aliens watching TV signals from Earth mistake the cast of a cult status science fiction show for real space adventurers and spirit them away to help save their planet.

It's "Three Amigos" with a tongue-in-cheek "Star Trek" twist and -- at first, anyway -- a pitch-perfect tone of benevolent mockery.

Clad in faux-futuristic Neoprene jumpsuits and sporting bowl-cut hair dos that would embarrass Mr. Spock, the clueless aliens with halcyon smirks, waddling walks and a nasal, monotone vocabulary are themselves mistaken for autograph-hunting geeks when they invade a sci-fi convention to recruit the "crew" of the illustrious fictional spaceship, the NESA Protector.

Continue reading: Galaxy Quest Review

Heist Review


Good

One would think there could be no way to freshen up a plot as shopworn as the "one last big heist before retirement." By all rights, this should be the stuff of straight-to-video B movies by now.

But this year has seen three such pictures so intelligent, intricate and resourceful that by their very diversity they prove there's a lot of life left in the genre -- if a movie is in the right hands.

Robert De Niro, Edward Norton and Marlon Brando staged a break-in at the Montreal Customs House in thrilling, high-gloss "The Score." Ben Kingsley and Ray Winstone faced off as rival cockney toughs working a bank job in the edgy, oily "Sexy Beast." And now comes "Heist" -- a gritty, exhilaratingly tense thriller that benefits from a most elaborate array of rapid-fire twists and the sharp, delicious, cadence of dialogue by writer-director David Mamet.

Continue reading: Heist Review

Charlie's Angels Review


Good

In one of many joyously over-the-top undercover scenes in the impish big screen adaptation of "Charlie's Angels," Drew Barrymore -- incognito as part of a sexbomb race track pit crew clad in cleavage-flaunting stars-and-stripes leather jumpsuits -- distracts a bad guy's chauffeur by seductively licking the steering wheel of his car.

The way Barrymore embraces the preposterousness of this moment with giddy aplomb personifies the spirit of this comedically sexy, digitally enhanced, candy-colored, B-movie mock-exploitation romp.

A vast, sassy, action-packed improvement on the '70s TV show, which never could reconcile its insincere femme empowerment message with its transparent jiggle factor draw, this picture adds to the mix a "Xena"-like self-aware sense of humor that gives flight to the formulaic proceedings.

Continue reading: Charlie's Angels Review

Matchstick Men Review


Good

A post-pubescent "Paper Moon" with a hell of a hair-pin twist, "Matchstick Men" features sublimely winning performances by Nicholas Cage, as an unhinged obsessive-compulsive con artist named Roy, and Alison Lohman ("White Oleander") as his tomboy-cutie teenage daughter Angela, who has such a gift for the grift that it sends her dad into a tizzy of pride, consternation and self-conscious moral conflict.

Her effervescent, skateboarding arrival into his life -- thanks to a new shrink (Bruce Altman) who encouraged him to look up the wife he left pregnant 14 years ago -- dishevels Roy's hospital-corners life. But surprisingly enough, her clothes strewn around his house, pizza dinners and ice cream breakfasts (Roy eats nothing but tuna fish -- from the can) slowly chip away at his neuroses (well that and those new blue pills the shrink is giving him) as our guy begins to enjoy fatherhood.

Soon he's loosened up so much he's ready to break his own rules of playing it safe with small-time flimflams and take a risky shot at a big-money "long con" -- a currency exchange sting on a shady businessman -- that his partner Frank (Sam Rockwell) has been pitching him for months. Of course, Angela wants in on the action too, so in a scene typical of the movie's spontaneous sense of humor, she begins cataloging aloud all her "learning experiences" with boys until he relents in a fluster of hear-no-evil fatherly instinct.

Continue reading: Matchstick Men Review

Sam Rockwell

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Sam Rockwell

Date of birth

5th November, 1968

Occupation

Actor

Sex

Male

Height

1.75


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Sam Rockwell Movies

Three Billboards Outside Ebbing Missouri Trailer

Three Billboards Outside Ebbing Missouri Trailer

Somebody messed with the wrong mother when they murdered her daughter Angela Hayes (Kathryn Newton)....

Mr. Right Trailer

Mr. Right Trailer

In Martha's mind, she's a fantastic girlfriend but finds it impossible to hold on to...

Poltergeist Trailer

Poltergeist Trailer

Finding the perfect house is an important part of starting a family. But for one...

Don Verdean Trailer

Don Verdean Trailer

With the potential to earn a quick bit of cash here and there, Don Verdean...

Say When [Laggies] Movie Review

Say When [Laggies] Movie Review

Keira Knightley continues to open up as an actress with this sparky comedy. As in...

Laggies Trailer

Laggies Trailer

Megan (Keira Knightley) is 28-years-old and she still hasn't got any sort of long term...

The Way, Way Back Movie Review

The Way, Way Back Movie Review

An especially strong script gives actors plenty to chew on in this comedy-drama, in which...

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The Way, Way Back Trailer

The Way, Way Back Trailer

Duncan is a 14-year-old boy struggling to fit in anywhere and dealing with all the...

Seven Psychopaths Movie Review

Seven Psychopaths Movie Review

Martin McDonagh gleefully plays with both the gang thriller genre and the moviemaking process with...

Seven Psychopaths Trailer

Seven Psychopaths Trailer

Marty is a budding screenwriter in LA with hopes of completing his major screenplay 'Seven...

The Sitter Trailer

The Sitter Trailer

After Noah Jaybird is suspended from college, he ends up living back at home with...

Cowboys & Aliens Movie Review

Cowboys & Aliens Movie Review

With such a blatant B-movie title, this well-made film really should be more fun to...

Conviction Movie Review

Conviction Movie Review

An extremely strong true story is told with emotion and skill, but never really rises...

Cowboys & Aliens Trailer

Cowboys & Aliens Trailer

Jake Lonergan is a wanted criminal but when he awakes in the middle of nowhere...

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