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The Art Of Getting By Review


OK
Mopey, style-free filmmaking undermines what might have been an engaging coming-of-age movie. The bright cast holds our interest, but the corny, too-cute plot will only be of interest to pre-teen girls.

In his senior year at a Manhattan prep school, George (Highmore) can't muster up the energy to do his schoolwork. A bright kid with serious artistic talent, he's in trouble with the principal (Underwood) for failing his classes. He's also uninterested in communicating with his mother (Wilson) or stepdad (Robards). The class' hot bad girl Sally (Roberts) takes an interest in him, but he can't do much more than follow her around, even when his mentor painter (Angarano) urges him to make a move.

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The Art Of Getting By Trailer


George is a senior at a private high school in New York. He has never done a day's work in his life and sees no point in trying to do anything because sooner or later he will die. When he should be working on assignments for school, he watches TV, listens to music or does anything that isn't what he should be doing. Despite never taking Art classes seriously, George shows talent at drawing and it's his favourite subject, but his untapped talent isn't enough to save him from the principal who puts him on academic probation due to constant slacking.

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The Rebound Review


Good
A charming and observant tone helps lift this above most romantic comedies, at least until the formula kicks in during the final rather contrived act. But until then, it keeps us happily smiling and sighing along.

After she catches her husband cheating, 40-year-old Sandy (Zeta-Jones) takes her two kids (Gould and Cherry) and moves into Manhattan. She finds an entry-level job and a flat above a coffee shop, where recently divorced 25-year-old barista Aram (Bartha) is happy to watch the kids. Meanwhile, Sandy's pal Daphne (Grant) urges her to get back out on the dating scene, but after a few disastrous nights the babysitter starts to look like a possibility.

But can they overcome their age difference and recover from their bad past relationships?

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Obsessed (2002) Review


Good
A quarter century ago, John Badham was directing classics like Saturday Night Fever and WarGames. It's a tragedy, then, to find him directing made for TV movies these days -- for Lifetime, no less.

At least he's got the comely Jenna Elfman on his side in this true crime drama, which thank God is not nearly as horrible as you might be expecting. The pitch: He (Charles Powell) is a fancy pants doctor and says she's been stalking him mercilessly. She (Elfman) says they had a long-term relationship and she just got a little upset there at the end.

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Perestroika Review


Excellent
Deeply personal, fiercely political, whimsical and unpredictable in style, and direct in voice, writer-director Slava Tsukerman's Perestroika resonates across personal, national, global, and even cosmic levels, all at once. After 17 years of self-imposed exile in America, renowned Jewish astrophysicist Sasha Greenburg returns to his hometown, Moscow, in 1992, the year that Perestroika ("restructuring") is sending shock waves through the social, cultural, and political life of Russia. Perestroika has meant greater political freedom, but it's a freedom without the infrastructure of purpose such that millions are flailing for opportunity. The young yearn for a vitality lacking in their cultural life, the elderly must live on measly pensions, the black market thrives, and vodka-rationing is causing widespread discontent in a nation rife with alcoholics.

Sasha (Sam Robards) has arrived here to address a conference on the structure of the universe -- his life-long obsession. The occasion reunites him with his testy old mentor, Professor Gross (F. Murray Abraham), and with Natasha (Oksana Stashenko), a former colleague and ex-lover who stirs up suspicions that Sasha may have fathered her teenage daughter before he left the country in the mid-'70s. The situation further compounds Sasha's midlife crisis: His marriage to Helen (Ally Sheedy), an American physicist, has fallen apart, and he's in the midst of a dead-end affair with another American, Jill (Jicky Schnee), a filmmaker accompanying him so she can gather newly declassified footage about the country's pollution crisis for her own environmental documentary.

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Sam Robards Tuesday 23rd October 2007 Opening night of the Roundabout Theater Off-Broadway production of "The Overwhelming" at the Laura Pels Theatre. New York City, USA

Sam Robards
Sam Robards
Sam Robards, Linda Powell and Cast
Sam Robards, Linda Powell and Colin Powell's Daughter
Sam Robards, Linda Powell and Cast
Sam Robards, Ron Cephas Jones and Boris Mcgiver

Mrs. Parker And The Vicious Circle Review


Very Good
Alan Rudolph's loving portrayal of Dorothy Parker (a spot-on yet frequently incomprehensible Jennifer Jason Leigh) is a film for historians and literary fans alike, with a cast featuring more art-house favorites than any other movie in recent memory (just look at the cast list!). The film drips into treacle with its treatment of the love triangle among Parker, her husband (Matthew Broderick), and Robert Benchley (Campbell Scott). It's the primary focus of the movie but also its weakest link. The film is at its heights when the ensemble is in full force as Parker plies her wit around the Algonquin Round Table and various social affairs (all during the age of Prohibition). Leigh was snubbed on an Oscar nomination here despite a strong performance in a very weak year (Jessica Lange won for the tepid Blue Sky).

Catch That Kid Review


Good
There's an important lesson every male should learn, even at a young age: Women always get their way. You listening, fellas? Pack it up, party's over, that's the way of the world. The likable but unambitious Catch That Kid delivers this bubble-bursting curveball to ten-year-old boys everywhere, delivering a preteen heroine that knows the only way to make things happen. Be a playa.

She's a cute tomboy named Maddy (Kristen Stewart, Panic Room), a determined mountain climber-in-training who idolizes her dad (Sam Robards) and helps her overworked mom (Jennifer Beals). She's got two pint-sized buddies: Gus (Max Thieriot), a mini-Mr. Fix-It who loves go-karts and really digs Maddy, and Austin (Corbin Bleu), a crack technology whiz who also really digs Maddy.

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Fandango Review


Excellent
Kevin Costner didn't get his start in Fandango, but he might as well have. This classic comedy gave us an early-career Costner as head of the "Groovers," a band of five roommates who decide to take one quick road trip after graduating from The University of Texas in 1971 -- only to find the spectre of Vietnam (and marriage) waiting for them in a matter of days.

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Life As A House Review


Good
The good news for George, a middle-aged, washed up architect, is that an enormous life change has motivated him to connect with his horrible teenage son and build a house by the ocean. The bad news is that the change is terminal cancer. The good news for moviegoers is that Irwin Winkler's Life as a House is filled with sharp, solid acting, a decent, sometimes harsh, script, and a few surprises. The bad news is that anything worth seeing here lives within an uneven sap of a film, unable to break free from the traditional Hollywood devices.

But much of Life as a House is completely watchable. Mark Andrus's script (he's written As Good As It Gets and the underrated, rarely seen Late For Dinner) appears cookie-cutter: he gives us the lazy, lonely, eccentric nobody (Kevin Kline); his estranged family, including beautiful ex-wife (Kristin Scott Thomas) and alienated teen (Hayden Christensen); and his predictably uptight neighbors, pissed off that his ramshackle of a house has stood in their beautiful oceanside neighborhood for twenty years.

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A.I. Artificial Intelligence Review


Good
I remember sitting in a movie theater at the tender age of 14, watching a little film called D.A.R.Y.L., about a boy with a computer brain trying to cope with modern society and questions of emotion and identity. D.A.R.Y.L. was not some overblown, 2 1/2-hour ordeal. It was 99 breezy minutes of fun fun fun!

A.I. Artificial Intelligence is, too my deep dismay, neither breezy nor particularly fun. The level of anticipation of the film, of course, would be impossible to effectively sate, but A.I. just doesn't cut it. It doesn't even come close.

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Sam Robards

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Sam Robards Movies

The Art of Getting By Movie Review

The Art of Getting By Movie Review

Mopey, style-free filmmaking undermines what might have been an engaging coming-of-age movie. The bright cast...

The Art Of Getting By Trailer

The Art Of Getting By Trailer

George is a senior at a private high school in New York. He has never...

The Rebound Movie Review

The Rebound Movie Review

A charming and observant tone helps lift this above most romantic comedies, at least until...

Catch That Kid Movie Review

Catch That Kid Movie Review

There's an important lesson every male should learn, even at a young age: Women always...

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American Beauty Movie Review

American Beauty Movie Review

At last, a movie with no likable characters that is nothing short of a joy...

Life as a House Movie Review

Life as a House Movie Review

The good news for George, a middle-aged, washed up architect, is that an enormous life...

A.I. Artificial Intelligence Movie Review

A.I. Artificial Intelligence Movie Review

I remember sitting in a movie theater at the tender age of 14, watching a...

Life As A House Movie Review

Life As A House Movie Review

Shaping an entire story around one potent metaphysical metaphor, "Life as a House" overcomes many...

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