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Jurassic Park Velociraptor Cage Lists On EBay, Bidding War Begins


Chris Pratt Sam Neill

Someone has listed the authentic velociraptor cage from the Jurassic Park movie on eBay, complete with rust and "full size velociraptor prop"! eBay sellers 'Theme Park Connection' have the rare item up for sale, with collection from Los Angeles offered as the only delivery option.

Jurassic World Poster
Celebrate The New 'Jurassic World' Movie By Treating Yourself To Your Very Own Velociraptor Crate.

At the time of writing, with seven days to go until the end of the auction, the bidding total stands at $99,900.10 (£60.3K) and the wood and metal crate is sold with "significant signs of wear," making "an amazing restoration project" according to the dealer.

Continue reading: Jurassic Park Velociraptor Cage Lists On EBay, Bidding War Begins

Jurassic Park 3D Trailer


When John Hammond of genetic engineering company InGen manages to clone dinosaurs from prehistoric DNA on an island-turned-theme park, it didn't bode well for visitors. After his investors force him to enlist the help of two palaeontologists and a chaiotician to make sure that the park is safe enough to open to the public, things go badly wrong when a double-crossing InGen computer programmer attempts to steal dinosaur embryos for a rival company by deactivating the security system and releasing the dangerous creatures from their enclosures. The adventure becomes less of an exciting opportunity for exclusive access to new technology, and more of a deadly struggle to survive.

What's better than gigantic deadly dinos on cinema screen? Try gigantic deadly dinos in 3D! The triple Oscar winning 'Jurassic Park' is set to hit our screens again 20 years after it was first released. It was directed by Steven Spielberg ('Saving Private Ryan', 'Schindler's List', 'Jaws', 'E.T.') in 1993 after he adapted it from best-selling novelist Michael Crichton's book of the same name, with a screenplay co-written by Crichton and David Koepp ('Mission: Impossible', 'War of the Worlds', 'Angels & Demons'). It will arrive in 3D soon in the US on April 5th 2013.

Starring: Sam Neill, Laura Dern, Jeff Goldblum, Richard Attenborough, Bob Peck, Martin Ferrero, Joseph Mazzello, Ariana Richards, Samuel L. Jackson, BD Wong, Wayne Knight, Gerald R. Molen, Miguel Sandoval, Cameron Thor, Christopher John Fields,

Continue: Jurassic Park 3D Trailer

Legend Of The Guardians: The Owls Of Ga'Hoole Review


Excellent
Spectacular animation and a terrific voice cast go a long way to making this soaring adventure feel much more original than it is. Despite heavy echoes of other movies, it's thoroughly engaging and often genuinely thrilling.

Soren (voiced by Sturgess) is an idealistic owlet who dreams of one day meeting his heroes, the mythical Guardians of Ga'Hoole. Then he and his brother Kludd (Kwanten) are kidnapped by the evil Pure Ones, led by Queen Nyra (Mirren) and Metalbeak (Edgerton), as slaves for their nefarious plan. In their wasteland hideout, Soren meets the feisty dwarf owl Gylfie (Barclay), and they flee to Ga'Hoole for help. There, Soren meets the quirky Ezylryb (Rush), who helps teach him to fly properly and punctures some of his heroic ideals before they head into battle.

Continue reading: Legend Of The Guardians: The Owls Of Ga'Hoole Review

Daybreakers Review


Good
Yet another entry into the post-apocalyptic vampire/zombie catalog, this stylish film at least has a sense of its own absurdity. While it plays everything dead straight, it also has a lot of fun with the rules of the genre.

It's 2019, and a virus has turned 95 percent of the population into vampires.

The problem is that as humans become extinct the vampires are starving for blood. So haematologist Edward (Hawke) is looking for a blood substitute, driven for profits by his aggressive boss (Neill). Trials aren't going well when Edward runs into some humans (including Karvan and Dafoe) who have a radical alternative: a cure for vampirism. But Edward's human-hunting military brother (Dorman) isn't happy about this.

Continue reading: Daybreakers Review

Daybreakers Trailer


Watch the trailer for Daybreakers

Continue: Daybreakers Trailer

The Final Conflict Review


OK
The third installment in the Omen series -- and popularly referred to as just The Omen III instead of its "official" name -- wraps up the story of Damien Thorn, starting where we expect and finishing up with its logical conclusion. Easily the weakest entry in the trilogy (a fourth was made -- for cable -- but it's widely ignored as non-canon), it's lacks the thrills of the first two entries, but it's still a watchable experience.

Damien is now grown up, and being played by a creepy Sam Neill with such menacing fire that it's a miracle his career recovered to the point where he'd become mostly known for blonde "good guys." Having run Thorn Industries for seven years, Damien uses his powers to coerce the American ambassador to England into committing suicide, then finagles the appointment for himself. Exactly why he needs such a job is never explained, but it does bring the story full circle, as Damien's original dad in The Omen held that very position.

Continue reading: The Final Conflict Review

Sam Neill and Matt Carroll Monday 21st April 2008 Sam Neill and Matt Carroll

Sam Neill and Matt Carroll
Sam Neill and Matt Carroll

Little Fish Review


Very Good
Films about drugs and recovery are usually of two schools. Either they're about the comic situations that arise from discovering yourself underneath a drug haze or they're hard-nosed films about a family bonding in the face of getting over the addiction. These films vary in worth to the viewer, but rarely do they slip between those two categories. So, Rowan Woods' Little Fish sorta blindsided me in its direct dealings with the struggle to keep clean, seasoned with crime spices. Some might group it in the latter group, but there's something else going on here.

Tracy (Cate Blanchett) works as an assistant manager in a small video-rental store in Sydney, Australia. She is recovering from a heroin addiction and trying to get money together to co-open a computer-gaming center with her boss. She lives with her mom and every once-in-awhile, looks in on her father figure, Lionel (Hugo Weaving). On his birthday, her brother (Martin Henderson) brings back Jonny (Dustin Nguyen), her old flame when she was using. He claims to be going straight and things begin to bubble again. This is interrupted by the fact that both Lionel and Tracy's brother are in business (and in Lionel's case, a sexual relationship) with Bradley (Sam Neill, complete menace), a ruthless drug dealer who is trying to retire. Tracy's hold on sobriety is tested to unfathomable lengths, and her trust in both brother and John is shaken to the core.

Continue reading: Little Fish Review

Jurassic Park III Review


Excellent

Dinosaurs!

While the first Jurassic Park was mediocre and the second film god-awful, Jurassic Park III finally gets the formula right. These movies were never meant to be science heavy or overly sentimental; they should've been what #3 is -- an amusement park thrill ride packed wall-to-wall with dinosaurs and more dinosaurs, clocking in at less than 90 minutes with as little dialogue and subplot as possible. Plus, big bonus -- no Jeff Goldblum!

Instead of Goldblum, JP3 brings back Sam Neill as the slightly grizzled Dr. Alan Grant who seems happy to put his terrifying up-close dino experiences behind him. Grant and his new protégé Billy (Alessandro Nivola) are once again looking for funding for their research, and are coaxed into accompanying a new wealthy benefactor -- Paul Kirby (William H. Macy) and his wife Amanda (Téa Leoni) -- on a fly-over of the second Jurassic island, Isla Sorna. But things turn ugly when the Kirbys announce they plan to land on the island to search for their 14-year-old son Eric (Trevor Morgan) who was conveniently lost there while paragliding. When the group ends up crash landing in the jungle, the movie becomes a race to see who will get off the island and who will become lunch. (Sounds like a cool idea for the next Survivor.)

While dialogue has never been these films' strongest suit, JP3 remedies this by having less of it. Regardless, the writers behind this screenplay-of-fewer-words are pretty impressive: Alexander Payne and Jim Taylor are the minds behind Citizen Ruth and Election. It comes off as a bit like how a dumb movie turns out when it's penned by smart people (like a Wayne's World) -- lots of action peppered with throw-away goofball lines like, "They weren't making dinosaurs; they were playing God."

As evidenced by dialogue like that, JP3 doesn't take itself too seriously, which is perhaps its saving grace; and it pulls no punches when taking potshots at the other two movies. For example, when Grant finds Eric (or, rather, after Eric rescues Grant), Eric tells the scientist, "I've read both your books. I liked the first one better than the second." Also, the so-called millionaire Kirby turns out to be a plumber. So much for a repeat of John Hammond.

Above all, JP3 packs in more dinosaurs per square inch than any other JP film before it. This time, big, angry reptiles are coming out of the sky and water as well as land, and the filmmakers even introduce a dino to rival the T. Rex, a massive monster called Spinosaur (that's right, dino-fighting). And, of course, the raptors are back, and now they can communicate with each other (don't ask, evolution's a bitch). Most importantly, none of the humans try to fight the dinosaurs themselves, so we won't be seeing any unbelievable scenes of kids knocking out velociraptors with a few gymnastics kicks.

Efficiently crammed with lots of thrills, Jurassic Park III may come off as a little bit like a big-budget B-movie, but you're not likely to have a better time at a blockbuster this summer. It's just loud, smash-and-crash monster movie fun at its finest.

The DVD extras focus on the film's special effects -- surprisingly, very little CGI, very many animatronic legs and jaws.

Continue reading: Jurassic Park III Review

Sirens (1994) Review


Very Good
Interesting study of British social mores and their views on pornography, when Grant goes to visit a painter whose work is deemed obscene. Oh, and he's got tons of naked babes. Yeah!

The Dish Review


OK
Another "quirky" Australian comedy is poised to be consumed by the ignorant American masses. The Dish (one of the most popular films in Australia!!) has been hailed as "an inspired human comedy" complete with quirky characters, a heartwarming story, nostalgic images of past glories, and enough sheep jokes to make my grandmother chuckle. The only thing they forgot to include is a reason to care about this fluff of a film.

Based on a true story, The Dish chronicles a giant satellite dish located in a sheep paddock in Parkes, Australia that assisted in transmitting communications and television signal broadcasts between Apollo 11 and NASA in the summer of 1969. The dish is the largest in the Southern Hemisphere and was the only dish in 1969 powerful enough to capture the live camera broadcasts from the historic landing on the moon on July 20, 1969. Running the dish are four quirky characters: Cliff Burton (Sam Neill), the dish's supervisor who smokes too much and pines over his dead wife; Mitch (Kevin Harrington), the nerdy dish technician in love with the local town girl; Glen (Tom Long), the "chip-on-his-shoulder" dish operator who spends most of the film whining; and Al Burnett (Patrick Warburton), the stuffy NASA agent who wears thick glasses and carries the nurturing tone of Barbara Walters. These four knuckleheads, during Apollo's flight, overcome such obstacles as political ass-kissing, power outages, puppy love, gale force winds, and ridiculous moment-of-purpose speeches in order to not look like a bunch of Australian outback hicks working in the middle of a sheep paddock.

Continue reading: The Dish Review

Children Of The Revolution Review


Good
A true oddity, in keeping with Australian cinema. What with F. Murray Abraham as Stalin (yes, the Stalin), who fathers a lovechild in the 1950s with a visiting Australian radical played by Judy Davis, how can you expect anything but weirdness? With early-career appearances by Rachel Griffiths and Geoffrey Rush, Children of the Revolution is remarkable for its sheer ballsiness, but the story is likely a bit too circuitous, self-referential, and unbelievable for most tastes. Ostensibly based on a true story, the sarcasm eventually gets so thick you find you need a mint.

Snow White: A Tale Of Terror Review


Very Good
This live-action update of Snow White isn't your mommy's fairy tale. If the title didn't give it away, this is a more Grimm-like version of the story with the evil queen (Sigourney Weaver) playing jealous stepmom to Lilliana (aka Snow, Monica Keena), who goes into hiding with a gang of ruffians (only one of whom is a dwarf) when the going gets tough. Very likeable, and probably the only R-rated version of Snow you'll ever see.

Jurassic Park Review


Good

When John Hammond, the rich billionaire who creates Jurassic Park, says he "spared no expense," we might as well be listening to Steven Spielberg, the film's prolific director. Jurassic Park cost somewhere in the vicinity of $63 million to make but that seems like nothing compared to the return, which was only a hair under $400 million. This is when we really knew what Spielberg could do: He could make a blockbuster better than anyone in the world. Jurassic Park isn't his best film by a long shot, but its mesmerizing entertainment and proof that the man is the go-to guy for action and adventure.

The beginning sets the pace perfectly: While transporting a cloned dinosaur into the titular theme park, a worker is pulled into its cage and ravaged while the other workers prod the beast to no avail. It's the following lawsuit that makes the park's owner, John Hammond (Richard Attenborough), want to bring in married paleontologists Alan and Ellie (Sam Neill and Laura Dern), theorist Ian (Jeff Goldblum), and his lawyer Mr. Gennaro (Martin Ferrero) to consult and give the park their seal of approval. When they first arrive, they are amazed by the dinosaurs and charmed by Hammond, his money and his technology. They are also charmed by his grandchildren, Tim and Lex (Joseph Mazzello and Ariana Richards), who come right before the security breaks down. Soon enough, the dinosaurs are loose, eating humans (and each other) with rampant glee.

The main attractions, obviously, are the dinosaurs and the wizards at Stan Winston Studios and Industrial Light and Magic, who did the special and visual effects for the film. For the raptors, specifically, they give the creatures such a fluid range of motion that the carnality of their attacks gives off a vibrant feeling. Spielberg has a knack for mixing visual fireworks with a solid storyline, but he still has trouble with his characters and making them deeper than mere sketches of people. It's easy: Hammond is the rich guy who learns his lesson, Alan is the logical, surprisingly adept hero, Ellie is his equal but understands more emotional things, Ian is the comic relief, Lex and Tim are the innocents, and the lawyer is a meal. But none of these characters really go beyond these archetypes, although the actors try their hardest to give the lines depth (special kudos to Dern and Neill). David Koepp, assisted by Michael Crichton, has crafted a great story in his screenplay, but he never gives enough care to the details of the characters.

It's been argued by a lot of people that Spielberg is a hack; that he treats his controversial films (Schindler's List, Amistad) with the same do-anything rush of his action/adventure films (Minority Report, the Indiana Jones trilogy). Maybe they have a point, but there is no arguing that Spielberg is an important director and a potent storyteller. Jurassic Park serves as an example of his control of story and imagery but also shows off his lack of character development, which has only really been cured in Jaws, indisputably his best film. His next film, Munich, was written by Tony Kushner, the famed author of Angels in America, which might make for a deeper drama from Spielberg. Either way, I guarantee that the producers spared no expense.

Continue reading: Jurassic Park Review

Bicentennial Man Review


Good
Robin Williams wants -- and needs -- nothing more than to have his own The Truman Show -- a Hail Mary to ward off permanent stereotyping. Typecast as a goofy loudmouth in throwaway films ranging from Mrs. Doubtfire to Fathers' Day to Flubber, you have to look back all the way to The Fisher King in 1991 for his last great starring role.

Bicentennial Man aims to turn that all around by making Williams something we can relate to once again. Ironically, that's not as a human: It's as a robot.

Continue reading: Bicentennial Man Review

Victory Review


Weak
Fairly pedantic and plodding, this period piece, set in 1913 in the Dutch East Indies (ah, I remember the Dutch East Indies...), this film has all the makings of a sultry romance (think The Piano) but never amounts to much more than a watery day-trip.

The convoluted story has a female violinist (Irène Jacob) shanghaied from her indentured servitude by a semi-wealthy island-dweller (Willem Dafoe). Naturally, the woman's owner becomes a bit miffed and sends some goons (including Rufus Sewell and Sam Neill in a rare bad-guy role) after them. Imagine the hijinks!

Continue reading: Victory Review

The Hunt For Red October Review


Extraordinary
If any film in Tom Clancy's Jack Ryan series stands out as the best (or even a truly great movie), it's The Hunt for Red October. It was Clancy's first book starring the unlikely hero and the only film to star Alec Baldwin as Ryan. Baldwin does a great job here -- portraying Ryan not as a gung-ho commando, as Harrison Ford would interpret the role, or as a know-it-all brat, as Ben Affleck would shamefully turn in down the line.

Baldwin is perfect, but his sparring partner, Sean Connery, is even better. As a Russian sub captain defecting to the U.S. -- and bringing his titular, silent sub with him -- Connery turns in yet another memorable performance, full of ballsy gusto and cocksureness. Supporting players run the gamut from Sam Neill to James Earl Jones (the only real fixture in the Jack Ryan cycle) to Tim Curry.

Continue reading: The Hunt For Red October Review

The Horse Whisperer Review


Weak
An atrocity in the grand history of films like The Bridges of Madison County. This is yet another grown-up romance, overblown, sappy, sentimental, and just plain stupid -- featuring Redford as a guy who is strangely in tune with horsies. Yee haw! Turn off your brain before you watch it.

In The Mouth Of Madness Review


Good
Curious recursive horror movie, in which mild-mannered Sam Neill is sent to investigate the disappearance of a massively famous horror author (Jürgen Prochnow). Turns out Prochnow's Sutter Cane is living in his own horrific imagination, and anyone that visits his town finds himself living there too. And Cane's world of hell is set to move on out to the rest of the world when his latest book (and movie) come out. Neill is effective but sidekick Julie Carmen (who?) comes off as the poor man's Talia Shire. Overall this is a relatively original riff on the genre, and worth checking out for horror fans looking for a bit of a new spin.

The Piano Review


Essential
"We can't leave the piano!" Anna Paquin's precociousness and grating voice may have turned a lot of people away from The Piano, but her Oscar a few months later redeemed her somewhat. Paquin has since grown up, but her debut film is unforgettable: The haunting tragedy-with-happy-ending of an 1800s-era mute woman essentially exiled to New Zealand with her emotionally dead husband. Jane Campion does her best directing ever, working a miracle out of the bizarre Harvey Keitel, with whom Holly Hunter's Ada falls in love. Forbidden romance on a deserted, cold, and rainy island? Sign me up.

Wimbledon Review


Very Good
Unless you play the sport, tennis ranks right up there with golf as one of the most boring sports to watch on television. And with a few minor exceptions, the same can be said about these sports' big screen counterparts. Anticipating that Wimbledon would serve up little more than a predictable romantic comedy, I hoped the film's setting would provide a few more aces than foot faults to compensate. Much to my surprise, Wimbledon exceeds meager expectations.

As the world's 119th ranked player, a tired Peter Colt (Paul Bettany) has long been the doormat for the younger, flashier players on the professional tennis circuit. But when Peter gets an unexpected wild-card invite to play at Wimbledon, few give him any chance of making it out of the first round - including himself and his brother who wagers against him with a local bookie.

Continue reading: Wimbledon Review

My Brilliant Career Review


Good
Gillian Armstrong recruits a young Judy Davis, Sam Neill, and beloved Scottish book for this odd little cult favorite, a story about a woman who has to choose between her "brilliant" career and the various men in her life. Davis is charmingly cynical in the film, and Neill's a winner, but ultimately this period piece gets so caught up in its own cleverness and wannabe shock that it comes off as trite.

Yes Review


Weak
I usually give Sally Potter a lot of slack; I've enjoyedall three of her feature films so far ("Orlando," "The TangoLesson" and "TheMan Who Cried"), even if I've been alonein doing so. She's an intelligent and sensitive filmmaker who usually establishesbreathing room for her deeply felt characters.

However her latest film, "Yes," is a failed experiment.Joan Allen plays an Irish-born woman stuck in a loveless, childless marriageto a philandering husband (Sam Neill). She meets a Lebanese cook (SimonAbkarian) who was once a surgeon in Beirut, and begins a love affair. Writtenentirely in verse, "Yes" requires the actors to suffer throughlong passages of blathering talk, and the scenes routinely dry out longbefore they end.

Potter attempts to add layers to the film by hinting atpolitical paranoia and showing scenes through surveillance cameras, butthe verse angle nullifies these attempts. The superb Allen is capable ofextremes: from icy control to dropping her emotional guard, yet she cannotmake this film's rhythms work.

Shirley Henderson, playing a maid who observes the actionand breaks the fourth wall by speaking directly to the camera, shows justhow the film might have played. With her silky, slithering delivery, sheplays with the words like a snake might toy with a mouse.

Wimbledon Review


OK

More moderately charming than a romantic comedy should be with stars as charismatic and irresistible as Kirsten Dunst and Paul Bettany -- but charming nonetheless -- "Wimbledon" is a cute mutt of cross-breeding between sports movie formula and chick-flick producers.

A product of the team behind "Four Weddings and a Funeral," "Notting Hill" and "Love Actually," it's a rousing athletic-underdog story about low-ranked, self-stymied pro tennis player Peter Colt (Bettany, from "A Knight's Tale," "A Beautiful Mind" and "Master and Commander") who finds his groove by falling in love with Lizzie Bradbury (Dunst), the rising-star queen troublemaker of women's tennis.

Full of confidence and flirtatious sass, very soon after their meet-cute (he's accidentally given the key to her hotel suite and walks in on her showering) she says to him, "Where do you come down on the fooling-around-before-a-match issue?" But she barely gives him time to answer, in the process giving a miraculous boost to his game at the world's most important tennis tournament -- and turning hers to mush.

Continue reading: Wimbledon Review

Bicentennial Man Review


Bad

Warning: This is not going to be an unbiased movie review. I think you should know right now that I've had it up to my eyeballs with Robin Williams' superficial brand of sentimentality.

For the last several years he's been making mostly movies like "Jack," "Patch Adams" and "Jakob the Liar," in which he does a little contractually obligated schtick then bat his eyes madly, trying his darndest to make us cry.

"Bicentennial Man" is more of the same, the only significant difference being in this picture his eyelids make a motorized hum every time he bats, because in "Bicentennial Man" Williams plays a robot. A robot who wants to be human.

Continue reading: Bicentennial Man Review

Jurassic Park III Review


OK

In 1993, the first "Jurassic Park" took Hollywood's first giant step into the world of computer generated special effects, rendering from scratch huge life-like dinosaurs that genuinely interacted with the humans they chased and chowed on. There were a few tell-tale signs of CGI style that savvy audiences now recognize (soft-focusy skin on some critters, for example). But there wasn't a movie-goer on Earth who wasn't agog at how real those dinos looked.

CGI effects have evolved exponentially in the last eight years and in "Jurassic Park III" the movie's biggest stars are so seamless blended and thoroughly convincing that the very concept of these ancient beasts being a special effect barely even crosses your mind. It only occurred to me once, for about 10 seconds, during a fight between a Tyrannosaurus Rex and this movie's even bigger, meaner baddie called Spinosaurus. Half way through the furious dust-up, it hit me: "Holy cow, these things aren't real!"

I might not even have thought about the effects at all except for being drawn to the extreme deliberateness of the movie's big-budget post-production by the over-amped, over-bearing, Dolby'd-to-death sound effects, apparently designed to shatter eardrums.

Continue reading: Jurassic Park III Review

The Dish Review


Good

The small-town-of-eccentrics genre is usually hit-or-miss -- or more frequently both hit and miss in the same picture. But just as frequently these movies are such a gas it's easy to forgive their foibles.

Such is the case with "The Dish," a tongue-in-cheek Aussie comedy about a real-life hamlet called Parkes and how it was put on the map in 1969 when the giant satellite dish located in a sheep pasture just outside of town became the Southern Hemisphere's relay station for the Apollo 11 moon landing.

The whole town is, of course, abuzz with excitement and nervous about putting its best foot forward when they hear that the prime minister and the American ambassador will be paying a visit. But most of the action takes place out at the dish, where a micromanaging NASA wonk (Patrick Warburton) with a narrow view of horseplay and an even narrower tie is hovering over the scientific trio that run the joint: the recently widowed and quietly reflective project director (Sam Neill), the smart-aleck technician (Kevin Harrington) and the sarcasm-impaired, nervous nerd mathematician (Tom Long).

Continue reading: The Dish Review

Sam Neill

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Sam Neill

Date of birth

14th September, 1947

Occupation

Actor

Sex

Male

Height

1.82




Sam Neill Movies

The Commuter Trailer

The Commuter Trailer

Every working day for the last ten years, insurance salesman Michael MacCauley has gotten the...

Thor: Ragnarok Trailer

Thor: Ragnarok Trailer

With his friends and his hammer, Thor is virtually unbeatable by any creature in the...

MindGamers: One Thousand Minds Connected (Live) Trailer Trailer

MindGamers: One Thousand Minds Connected (Live) Trailer Trailer

Just how far can human scientific advancements go? That's the question in this intense story...

Tommy's Honour Trailer

Tommy's Honour Trailer

Tommy Morris is an expert golfer who learned the sport from his father; the greens-keeper...

A Long Way Down Movie Review

A Long Way Down Movie Review

With a darkly serious theme and a corny rom-com filmmaking approach, this film never quite...

A Long Way Down Trailer

A Long Way Down Trailer

Martin Sharp is a disgraced TV presenter whose ambitions and family have been destroyed by...

Escape Plan Movie Review

Escape Plan Movie Review

You know not to expect something deep and meaningful when a movie stars Stallone and...

Peaky Blinders  Trailer

Peaky Blinders Trailer

Tommy Shelby is the ruthless and dangerous leader of Birmingham's Peaky Blinders gang; a group...

Escape Plan Trailer

Escape Plan Trailer

Ray Breslin is an expert in structural-security and has been able to break out of...

Jurassic Park 3D Trailer

Jurassic Park 3D Trailer

When John Hammond of genetic engineering company InGen manages to clone dinosaurs from prehistoric DNA...

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