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Jurassic Park Velociraptor Cage Lists On EBay, Bidding War Begins


Chris Pratt Sam Neill

Someone has listed the authentic velociraptor cage from the Jurassic Park movie on eBay, complete with rust and "full size velociraptor prop"! eBay sellers 'Theme Park Connection' have the rare item up for sale, with collection from Los Angeles offered as the only delivery option.

Jurassic World Poster
Celebrate The New 'Jurassic World' Movie By Treating Yourself To Your Very Own Velociraptor Crate.

At the time of writing, with seven days to go until the end of the auction, the bidding total stands at $99,900.10 (£60.3K) and the wood and metal crate is sold with "significant signs of wear," making "an amazing restoration project" according to the dealer.

Continue reading: Jurassic Park Velociraptor Cage Lists On EBay, Bidding War Begins

Escape Plan Trailer


Ray Breslin is an expert in structural-security and has been able to break out of every prison he has been placed in using highly skilled and unusual methods. However, when he is asked to design an escape proof prison for the country's biggest life-sentenced felons, he finds himself betrayed when he is subsequently kidnapped and incarcerated by a masked figure in that prison with no way of getting out. It is there he befriends Swan Rottmayer; a smart but aggressive inmate who takes a shine to Ray when he explains his determination to escape. Swan agrees to help, but this time it's going to take more than just clever methods to break free and find the people who double-crossed him.

Continue: Escape Plan Trailer

Can Brad Pitt And Angie Crack Winemaking? Other Grape Based Success Stories


Brad Pitt Angelina Jolie Sam Neill Gerard Depardieu Mick Hucknall

Brad Pitt and Angelina Jolie have announced they are moving into the wine business and will release their first effort - a Vintage Rose - later this year. The grape industry is a fashionable movie for celebrities nowadays, though some take it more serious than others. It's likely that Brangelina have tasted a nice fruity rose and decided to put their name to it, though some actors and musicians have gone the hold hog and bought entire vineries. In 2007, Nielsen's research of supermarket wine purchases showed sales of celebrity wines were up by 19%. It probably gives the consumer something to impress friends with after popping open the cork, "This one is made by Brad and Angelina, you know."

One actor very much active in both the production and business dealings of wine is French-turned-Russian star Gerard Depardieu, who owns wineries in several countries across the globe and even has his passport (now Russian) listing his occupation as vigneron. Since 2001, Depardieu has put his name to 13 different wines with wine mogul Bernard Magrez, mostly in conjunction with another expert, Michael Rolland. During an interview with Decanter.com, the Green Card actor said, "What I don't like is to publish a ban des vendages on a certain date [before which one is not allowed to harvest], I find that stupid. When you taste and you say "that's ready" I don't know why I need to keep it ripening. Sometimes I find wines that are a little overripe. I like wines to be a bit nervy, that aren't too aggressive."

Gerard Depardieu, Cannes Film FestivalDan Aykroyd, Yogi Bear Premiere

Continue reading: Can Brad Pitt And Angie Crack Winemaking? Other Grape Based Success Stories

Jurassic Park 3D Trailer


When John Hammond of genetic engineering company InGen manages to clone dinosaurs from prehistoric DNA on an island-turned-theme park, it didn't bode well for visitors. After his investors force him to enlist the help of two palaeontologists and a chaiotician to make sure that the park is safe enough to open to the public, things go badly wrong when a double-crossing InGen computer programmer attempts to steal dinosaur embryos for a rival company by deactivating the security system and releasing the dangerous creatures from their enclosures. The adventure becomes less of an exciting opportunity for exclusive access to new technology, and more of a deadly struggle to survive.

What's better than gigantic deadly dinos on cinema screen? Try gigantic deadly dinos in 3D! The triple Oscar winning 'Jurassic Park' is set to hit our screens again 20 years after it was first released. It was directed by Steven Spielberg ('Saving Private Ryan', 'Schindler's List', 'Jaws', 'E.T.') in 1993 after he adapted it from best-selling novelist Michael Crichton's book of the same name, with a screenplay co-written by Crichton and David Koepp ('Mission: Impossible', 'War of the Worlds', 'Angels & Demons'). It will arrive in 3D soon in the US on April 5th 2013.

Starring: Sam Neill, Laura Dern, Jeff Goldblum, Richard Attenborough, Bob Peck, Martin Ferrero, Joseph Mazzello, Ariana Richards, Samuel L. Jackson, BD Wong, Wayne Knight, Gerald R. Molen, Miguel Sandoval, Cameron Thor, Christopher John Fields,

Continue: Jurassic Park 3D Trailer

The Hunter Review


Excellent
Shot in the breathtaking wilds of Tasmania, this evocative dramatic thriller puts us into the head of a troubled man forced to confront uncomfortable truths about himself and the work he does. It's a riveting, unsettling, involving film made with skill and artistry.

Mercenary hunter Martin (Dafoe) is a loner hired by a mysterious client (Koman) to track down the last remaining Tasmanian tiger, a breed thought to be extinct. Shunned as a "greenie", he's given a room in a country home where Lucy (O'Connor) lives in isolation with her two kids (Davies and Woodlock), waiting for the return of her missing zoologist husband. With Jack (Neill) as a guide, Martin sets out to find the elusive tiger, but his efforts to avoid bonding with the family are much trickier.

Continue reading: The Hunter Review

The Vow Review


OK
Inspired by a true story, this film is watchable mainly because of the extraordinary events, which are genuinely involving and moving. Although typically, Hollywood has ramped up the emotions while avoiding subtlety at all costs.

Goofy recording engineer Leo (Tatum) and adorable artist Paige (McAdams) had a cute romance, quirky wedding and four happy years together before a car crash changed everything. Leo only has minor injuries, but Paige has lost some five years of memories. Crucially, she has no idea who Leo is. And she doesn't remember turning her back on her law course, smirking fiance (Speedman) and wealthy parents (Lange and Neill). They're all she remembers now, so Leo tries to remind her of who she became after she left them behind. If they'll let him.

Continue reading: The Vow Review

The Vow Trailer


Paige and Leo are a happily married couple and have been for five years. One night, they are driving home when Meat Loaf's I Will Do Anything For Love comes on the radio. Leo sings along, to Paige's amusement and as they stop their car to kiss, an oncoming truck crashes into the back of them. The resulting accident puts Paige in a coma for several months and when she wakes up, she can't remember her husband at all.

Continue: The Vow Trailer

Legend Of The Guardians: The Owls Of Ga'Hoole Review


Excellent
Spectacular animation and a terrific voice cast go a long way to making this soaring adventure feel much more original than it is. Despite heavy echoes of other movies, it's thoroughly engaging and often genuinely thrilling.

Soren (voiced by Sturgess) is an idealistic owlet who dreams of one day meeting his heroes, the mythical Guardians of Ga'Hoole. Then he and his brother Kludd (Kwanten) are kidnapped by the evil Pure Ones, led by Queen Nyra (Mirren) and Metalbeak (Edgerton), as slaves for their nefarious plan. In their wasteland hideout, Soren meets the feisty dwarf owl Gylfie (Barclay), and they flee to Ga'Hoole for help. There, Soren meets the quirky Ezylryb (Rush), who helps teach him to fly properly and punctures some of his heroic ideals before they head into battle.

Continue reading: Legend Of The Guardians: The Owls Of Ga'Hoole Review

Legend of the Guardians: The Owls of Ga'Hoole Trailer


The Guardians of Ga'Hoole are sworn to protect the innocent from trouble and vanquish evil. Soren is a young owl who's grown up listening to his father tell the stories of The Gaurdians. His dream is to one day join his heroes and be a part of that noble life he's learnt so much about.

Continue: Legend of the Guardians: The Owls of Ga'Hoole Trailer

Daybreakers Review


Good
Yet another entry into the post-apocalyptic vampire/zombie catalog, this stylish film at least has a sense of its own absurdity. While it plays everything dead straight, it also has a lot of fun with the rules of the genre.

It's 2019, and a virus has turned 95 percent of the population into vampires.

The problem is that as humans become extinct the vampires are starving for blood. So haematologist Edward (Hawke) is looking for a blood substitute, driven for profits by his aggressive boss (Neill). Trials aren't going well when Edward runs into some humans (including Karvan and Dafoe) who have a radical alternative: a cure for vampirism. But Edward's human-hunting military brother (Dorman) isn't happy about this.

Continue reading: Daybreakers Review

Skin Review


Extraordinary
Based on a true story, his powerful drama tells an important story from Apartheid-era South Africa with honesty and real sensitivity. And the cast makes it thoroughly gripping by never playing it safe.

In 1965, the Laing family is caught in a loophole of the 1950 law prohibiting South Africans from living or studying with people of another racial group. The problem is that Sandra (Ramangwane then Okonedo) looks more black than her white parents Abraham and Sannie (Neill and Krige). Treated horribly by teachers in her all-white school and abused by strangers, The Laings go to court to officially classify Sandra as white. But this has repercussions when she falls in love with a black man (Kgoroge) and can't legally live with her husband or children.

Continue reading: Skin Review

Daybreakers Trailer


Watch the trailer for Daybreakers

Continue: Daybreakers Trailer

Sam Neill Sunday 1st March 2009 The Australian premiere of 'Dean Spanley' - Arrivals Sydney, Australia

Sam Neill
Sam Neill
Sam Neill

Sam Neill Women in Film and Television Awards held at the Hilton Hotel Park Lane

Sam Neill

Sam Neill and the winner of the Talkback Thames News Talent Award Rebekah Gilbertson - Sam Neill and the winner of the Talkback Thames News Talent Award Rebekah Gilbertson London, England - Target Women in Film and Television Awards at the Hilton Hotel Friday 5th December 2008

Sam Neill and The Winner Of The Talkback Thames News Talent Award Rebekah Gilbertson

The Final Conflict Review


OK
The third installment in the Omen series -- and popularly referred to as just The Omen III instead of its "official" name -- wraps up the story of Damien Thorn, starting where we expect and finishing up with its logical conclusion. Easily the weakest entry in the trilogy (a fourth was made -- for cable -- but it's widely ignored as non-canon), it's lacks the thrills of the first two entries, but it's still a watchable experience.

Damien is now grown up, and being played by a creepy Sam Neill with such menacing fire that it's a miracle his career recovered to the point where he'd become mostly known for blonde "good guys." Having run Thorn Industries for seven years, Damien uses his powers to coerce the American ambassador to England into committing suicide, then finagles the appointment for himself. Exactly why he needs such a job is never explained, but it does bring the story full circle, as Damien's original dad in The Omen held that very position.

Continue reading: The Final Conflict Review

Sam Neill - Friday 17th October 2008 at Odeon West End London, England

Sam Neill
Sam Neill

Sam Neill - Sam Neill owns a winery in New Zealand London, England - Sam Neill at the premiere of Little Fish at Curzon Soho Sunday 16th July 2006

Sam Neill

Sam Neill and Matt Carroll Monday 21st April 2008 Sam Neill and Matt Carroll

Sam Neill and Matt Carroll
Sam Neill and Matt Carroll

Little Fish Review


Very Good
Films about drugs and recovery are usually of two schools. Either they're about the comic situations that arise from discovering yourself underneath a drug haze or they're hard-nosed films about a family bonding in the face of getting over the addiction. These films vary in worth to the viewer, but rarely do they slip between those two categories. So, Rowan Woods' Little Fish sorta blindsided me in its direct dealings with the struggle to keep clean, seasoned with crime spices. Some might group it in the latter group, but there's something else going on here.

Tracy (Cate Blanchett) works as an assistant manager in a small video-rental store in Sydney, Australia. She is recovering from a heroin addiction and trying to get money together to co-open a computer-gaming center with her boss. She lives with her mom and every once-in-awhile, looks in on her father figure, Lionel (Hugo Weaving). On his birthday, her brother (Martin Henderson) brings back Jonny (Dustin Nguyen), her old flame when she was using. He claims to be going straight and things begin to bubble again. This is interrupted by the fact that both Lionel and Tracy's brother are in business (and in Lionel's case, a sexual relationship) with Bradley (Sam Neill, complete menace), a ruthless drug dealer who is trying to retire. Tracy's hold on sobriety is tested to unfathomable lengths, and her trust in both brother and John is shaken to the core.

Continue reading: Little Fish Review

Jurassic Park III Review


Excellent

Dinosaurs!

While the first Jurassic Park was mediocre and the second film god-awful, Jurassic Park III finally gets the formula right. These movies were never meant to be science heavy or overly sentimental; they should've been what #3 is -- an amusement park thrill ride packed wall-to-wall with dinosaurs and more dinosaurs, clocking in at less than 90 minutes with as little dialogue and subplot as possible. Plus, big bonus -- no Jeff Goldblum!

Instead of Goldblum, JP3 brings back Sam Neill as the slightly grizzled Dr. Alan Grant who seems happy to put his terrifying up-close dino experiences behind him. Grant and his new protégé Billy (Alessandro Nivola) are once again looking for funding for their research, and are coaxed into accompanying a new wealthy benefactor -- Paul Kirby (William H. Macy) and his wife Amanda (Téa Leoni) -- on a fly-over of the second Jurassic island, Isla Sorna. But things turn ugly when the Kirbys announce they plan to land on the island to search for their 14-year-old son Eric (Trevor Morgan) who was conveniently lost there while paragliding. When the group ends up crash landing in the jungle, the movie becomes a race to see who will get off the island and who will become lunch. (Sounds like a cool idea for the next Survivor.)

While dialogue has never been these films' strongest suit, JP3 remedies this by having less of it. Regardless, the writers behind this screenplay-of-fewer-words are pretty impressive: Alexander Payne and Jim Taylor are the minds behind Citizen Ruth and Election. It comes off as a bit like how a dumb movie turns out when it's penned by smart people (like a Wayne's World) -- lots of action peppered with throw-away goofball lines like, "They weren't making dinosaurs; they were playing God."

As evidenced by dialogue like that, JP3 doesn't take itself too seriously, which is perhaps its saving grace; and it pulls no punches when taking potshots at the other two movies. For example, when Grant finds Eric (or, rather, after Eric rescues Grant), Eric tells the scientist, "I've read both your books. I liked the first one better than the second." Also, the so-called millionaire Kirby turns out to be a plumber. So much for a repeat of John Hammond.

Above all, JP3 packs in more dinosaurs per square inch than any other JP film before it. This time, big, angry reptiles are coming out of the sky and water as well as land, and the filmmakers even introduce a dino to rival the T. Rex, a massive monster called Spinosaur (that's right, dino-fighting). And, of course, the raptors are back, and now they can communicate with each other (don't ask, evolution's a bitch). Most importantly, none of the humans try to fight the dinosaurs themselves, so we won't be seeing any unbelievable scenes of kids knocking out velociraptors with a few gymnastics kicks.

Efficiently crammed with lots of thrills, Jurassic Park III may come off as a little bit like a big-budget B-movie, but you're not likely to have a better time at a blockbuster this summer. It's just loud, smash-and-crash monster movie fun at its finest.

The DVD extras focus on the film's special effects -- surprisingly, very little CGI, very many animatronic legs and jaws.

Continue reading: Jurassic Park III Review

Yes Review


Bad
Rambling monologues featuring rhyming dialogue. Lead characters named "He" and "She." Camerawork aching to be lauded in Film Comment. A maid serving as a philosophical voice of reason. It's all there in Yes, Sally Potter's endless, numbing cinematic essay on... on... something.

"She" (Joan Allen) is a London-based scientist (born in Belfast, raised in America) whose open marriage to her stoic, stuffy husband (Sam Neill) is dying a slow, painful death. "He" (Simon Abkarian) is a cook from Beirut, who meets her at a party, beginning a torrid affair that puts both on a physical and emotional trek taking them to Beirut, Belfast, New York, and a groovy Cuba.

Continue reading: Yes Review

A Cry In The Dark Review


Excellent
The true story of Lindy Chamberlain, a severe and embittered woman who was found innocent, then guilty, then innocent of murdering her child in the Australian outback in 1980. Her excuse: "The dingo took my baby." The case divided the nation of Australia for a decade, putting people in camps that believed the impossible -- that a wild dog ate a child -- or the unthinkable -- that her mother murdered her daughter. A Cry in the Dark is a tragic story that Meryl Streep (as Lindy) completely owns. But while it's very much a cautionary tale to keep your tent zipped up, the real moral of the story involves the crucial importance of being a sympathetic witness on the stand. Based on the book Evil Angels.

Restoration Review


Good
Robert Downey's schizophrenic personality has finally found a home in Restoration. This sweeping film, set in 1660 England during the reign of the flamboyant Charles II (Sam Neill), tells the story of Merivel (Downey), who rides a rollercoaster from volunteer surgeon to King's veterinarian, to his fall from grace and his eventual rebirth.

Merivel, the kind of guy who pawns his medical instruments to buy time with prostitutes, starts out as a pretty loathsome chap. However, he's also a pretty talented (and daring) physician, and after healing the King's beloved spaniel, he is brought into the fold of nobility. But the story then takes an inexplicable turn as Merivel is given a knighthood and coerced to marry the King's mistress, Celia (Polly Walker), and then promptly falls in love with her.

Continue reading: Restoration Review

Yes Review


Weak
I usually give Sally Potter a lot of slack; I've enjoyedall three of her feature films so far ("Orlando," "The TangoLesson" and "TheMan Who Cried"), even if I've been alonein doing so. She's an intelligent and sensitive filmmaker who usually establishesbreathing room for her deeply felt characters.

However her latest film, "Yes," is a failed experiment.Joan Allen plays an Irish-born woman stuck in a loveless, childless marriageto a philandering husband (Sam Neill). She meets a Lebanese cook (SimonAbkarian) who was once a surgeon in Beirut, and begins a love affair. Writtenentirely in verse, "Yes" requires the actors to suffer throughlong passages of blathering talk, and the scenes routinely dry out longbefore they end.

Potter attempts to add layers to the film by hinting atpolitical paranoia and showing scenes through surveillance cameras, butthe verse angle nullifies these attempts. The superb Allen is capable ofextremes: from icy control to dropping her emotional guard, yet she cannotmake this film's rhythms work.

Shirley Henderson, playing a maid who observes the actionand breaks the fourth wall by speaking directly to the camera, shows justhow the film might have played. With her silky, slithering delivery, sheplays with the words like a snake might toy with a mouse.

Jurassic Park III Review


OK

In 1993, the first "Jurassic Park" took Hollywood's first giant step into the world of computer generated special effects, rendering from scratch huge life-like dinosaurs that genuinely interacted with the humans they chased and chowed on. There were a few tell-tale signs of CGI style that savvy audiences now recognize (soft-focusy skin on some critters, for example). But there wasn't a movie-goer on Earth who wasn't agog at how real those dinos looked.

CGI effects have evolved exponentially in the last eight years and in "Jurassic Park III" the movie's biggest stars are so seamless blended and thoroughly convincing that the very concept of these ancient beasts being a special effect barely even crosses your mind. It only occurred to me once, for about 10 seconds, during a fight between a Tyrannosaurus Rex and this movie's even bigger, meaner baddie called Spinosaurus. Half way through the furious dust-up, it hit me: "Holy cow, these things aren't real!"

I might not even have thought about the effects at all except for being drawn to the extreme deliberateness of the movie's big-budget post-production by the over-amped, over-bearing, Dolby'd-to-death sound effects, apparently designed to shatter eardrums.

Continue reading: Jurassic Park III Review

Sam Neill

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Sam Neill

Date of birth

14th September, 1947

Occupation

Actor

Sex

Male

Height

1.82




Sam Neill Movies

The Commuter Trailer

The Commuter Trailer

Every working day for the last ten years, insurance salesman Michael MacCauley has gotten the...

Thor: Ragnarok Trailer

Thor: Ragnarok Trailer

With his friends and his hammer, Thor is virtually unbeatable by any creature in the...

MindGamers: One Thousand Minds Connected (Live) Trailer Trailer

MindGamers: One Thousand Minds Connected (Live) Trailer Trailer

Just how far can human scientific advancements go? That's the question in this intense story...

Tommy's Honour Trailer

Tommy's Honour Trailer

Tommy Morris is an expert golfer who learned the sport from his father; the greens-keeper...

A Long Way Down Movie Review

A Long Way Down Movie Review

With a darkly serious theme and a corny rom-com filmmaking approach, this film never quite...

A Long Way Down Trailer

A Long Way Down Trailer

Martin Sharp is a disgraced TV presenter whose ambitions and family have been destroyed by...

Escape Plan Movie Review

Escape Plan Movie Review

You know not to expect something deep and meaningful when a movie stars Stallone and...

Peaky Blinders  Trailer

Peaky Blinders Trailer

Tommy Shelby is the ruthless and dangerous leader of Birmingham's Peaky Blinders gang; a group...

Escape Plan Trailer

Escape Plan Trailer

Ray Breslin is an expert in structural-security and has been able to break out of...

Jurassic Park 3D Trailer

Jurassic Park 3D Trailer

When John Hammond of genetic engineering company InGen manages to clone dinosaurs from prehistoric DNA...

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