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Jessica Roffey and CEO of Relativity Media Ryan Kavanaugh - A host of stars were photographed as they attended the Vanity Fair Oscar Party which was held at the Wallis Annenberg Center for the Performing Arts and The Beverly Hills City Hall in Los Angeles, California, United States - Monday 23rd February 2015

Ryan Kavanaugh, Jessica Roffey and Vanity Fair

Ryan Kavanaugh - Los Angeles premiere of 'Black or White' - Arrivals at Regal Cinemas L.A. Live - Los Angeles, California, United States - Wednesday 21st January 2015

Ryan Kavanaugh
Ryan Kavanaugh
Ryan Kavanaugh

Jessica Roffey and Ryan Kavanaugh - A variety of stars were snapped as they arrived for the Art of Elysium's 8th Annual Heaven Gala held which was held at Hangar 8 in Los Angeles, California, United States - Saturday 10th January 2015

Jessica Roffey and Ryan Kavanaugh
Jessica Roffey and Ryan Kavanaugh
Ryan Kavanaugh and Jessica Roffey
Jessica Roffey and Ryan Kavanaugh
Jessica Roffey and Ryan Kavanaugh

Jessica Roffey and Ryan Kavanaugh - A variety of stars were snapped as they arrived for the Art of Elysium's 8th Annual Heaven Gala held which was held at Hangar 8 in Los Angeles, California, United States - Sunday 11th January 2015

Jessica Roffey and Ryan Kavanaugh
Jessica Roffey and Ryan Kavanaugh
Jessica Roffey and Ryan Kavanaugh

Gugu Mbatha-Raw, Ryan Kavanaugh and Nate Parker - Stars were photographed as they took to the red carpet for the New York premiere of Relativity Media's drama 'Beyond The Lights' The premiere was held at Regal Union Square Stadium 14 in Brooklyn, New York City, New York, United States - Thursday 13th November 2014

Gugu Mbatha-raw, Ryan Kavanaugh and Nate Parker
Gugu Mbatha-raw
Gugu Mbatha-raw
Gugu Mbatha-raw
Nate Parker and Gugu Mbatha-raw
Nate Parker, Gugu Mbatha-raw, Gina Prince-bythewood and Ryan Kavanaugh

Michael Bublé, Jennifer Hudson and Ryan Kavanaugh - The Beverly Hilton Hotel was the location for the 20th Annual Fulfillment Fund Stars Benefit Gala in Beverly Hills, California, United States - Tuesday 14th October 2014

Michael Bublé, Jennifer Hudson and Ryan Kavanaugh
Michael Bublé
Michael Bublé
Michael Bublé
Michael Bublé
Michael Bublé

Ryan Kavanaugh - Photographs of the stars on the red carpet for the premiere of "The Best Of Me" in Los Angeles at Regal Cinemas L.A. Live - Los Angeles, California, United States - Wednesday 8th October 2014

Ryan Kavanaugh
Ryan Kavanaugh

Ryan Kavanaugh - Los Angeles Premiere of 'The November Man' at TCL Chinese Theatre - Arrivals - Los Angeles, California, United States - Wednesday 13th August 2014

Ryan Kavanaugh
Ryan Kavanaugh

Valerie Michaels and Ryan Kavanaugh - Celebrities attend TheWrap.com 5th Annual Pre-Oscar Event at Culina Restaurant at the Four Seasons Hotel. - Los Angeles, California, United States - Wednesday 26th February 2014

Valerie Michaels and Ryan Kavanaugh
Ryan Kavanaugh
Valerie Michaels and Ryan Kavanaugh

Ryan Kavanaugh - The Onyx And Breezy Foundation's 'Saving Tails' Fundraiser in Hollywood - Los Angeles, California, United States - Saturday 13th April 2013

Ryan Kavanaugh
Ryan Kavanaugh and Britta Lazenga

Immortals Review


OK
Like 300 on acid, this outrageously violent Greek mythology epic bludgeons us into submission as we become increasingly frustrated by the flaky plot, thin characters and incoherent craziness. But it's so amazingly designed that we can't look away.

Theseus (Cavill) is a peasant being groomed for greatness by the god Zeus (Evans, or Hurt in human guise). And Greece needs him, because the mad King Hyperion (Rourke) is on the rampage looking for the all-powerful Epirus Bow so he can release the imprisoned titans and kill the gods. But Theseus will need the help of virginal seer Phaedra (Pinto) and slave sidekick Stavros (Dorff), because the gods are forbidden from intervening.

Continue reading: Immortals Review

Take Me Home Tonight Review


OK
He built his name on That '70s Show, and now Topher Grace stars in, produces and came up with the story for what should have been called That '80s Movie.

Clearly, the intention was to recreate the vibe of 1983's freewheeling romp Risky Business. And while it's good fun, it's also forgettable.

Matt (Grace) was a high-achiever in the class of 1984. He's just earned a top four-year engineering degree from MIT, but has no idea what to do with the rest of his life. Then one day he bumps into his high school crush Tori (Palmer) and pretends to be a successful banker. Soon he's invited to a cool party at the home of Kyle (Pratt), the hard-partying boyfriend of Matt's twin sister Wendy (Faris). And when Matt's goofy pal Barry (Fogler) tags along, it becomes clear that trouble won't be too far behind.

Continue reading: Take Me Home Tonight Review

Limitless Review


Excellent
Despite a rather incomplete premise, this sleek thriller barrels full-steam through its plot. It's involving and entertaining, and sometimes even thought-provoking. And it gives Cooper a role that perfectly uses his skills as an actor.

Plagued by writer's block, Eddie (Cooper) has become a scruffy loser, which prompts high-flying girlfriend Lindy (Cornish) to dump him. Then his drug-dealing ex-brother-in-law (Whitworth) offers him a clear pill called NZT that lets him access all of his brain. Suddenly, words flow freely and his mind races ahead, learning languages (the better for bedding beautiful women) and working the stock market. But his moneymaking schemes put him in league with both a nasty Russian loanshark (Howard) and a fat-cat businessman (De Niro), just as NZT's dark side-effects kick in.

Continue reading: Limitless Review

Sanctum Review


OK
Inspired by a true story and executive produced by underwater-film fanatic James Cameron, this cave-diving thriller has a lot going for it, thanks to a strong cast and high production values. But the script fails to make anything of the premise.

Fit young Aussie Josh (Wakefield) travels to a remote cave in Papua New Guinea with American financier-adventurer Carl (Gruffudd) and his girlfriend (Parkinson). There they join a team, already deep underground, led by Josh's hard-man dad Frank (Roxburgh). Having just discovered a massive new water-filled chamber, everyone's shocked by the accidental death of a team member (Cratchley). And then a tropical storm descends, flooding their base camp and forcing the spelunkers deeper underground in search of another way out. But the already strained team finds it difficult to work together.

Continue reading: Sanctum Review

Brothers Review


Good
This remake of Susanne Bier's 2004 drama is an equally powerful story of family tensions and how violence affects more than just the victim. But the original Danish film's strained melodrama translates here as well.

Sam Cahill (Maguire) is a loyal Marine getting ready to head back to Afghanistan with his men. His wife Grace (Portman) is trying to be strong for their young daughters (Madison and Geare), but his stern father (Shepard) couldn't be prouder. Just before he ships out, Sam's black-sheep brother Tommy (Gyllenhaal) gets out of prison and, when Sam is reported killed in action, he rises to the challenge to help care for Grace and the girls. But several months later Sam is found, and what he experienced has left him dangerously paranoid.

Continue reading: Brothers Review

A Perfect Getaway Review


Good
Scruffy and twisty, this honeymoon-from-hell thriller kind of unravels as it goes along. But before it succumbs to the formula, the actors manage to catch our attention, so we have to see it through to what'll surely be an outrageous finale.Cliff and Cydney (Zahn and Jovovich) are honeymooning in Kauai, where they decide to go on a two-day hike to an idyllic isolated beach, leaving just before hearing the news that there's a murderous couple on the loose. Soon they meet, and ditch, the rather shifty hitchhikers Cleo and Kale (Shelton and Hemsworth), then they decide to join another couple, Nick and Gina (Olyphant and Sanchez) for the hike. But Cleo and Kale catch up with them. And strange things start going snap in the jungle.From the beginning, we know writer-director Twohy intends on taking us for a ride, because of his purringly seductive filmmaking style and red herrings galore. Everyone looks suspicious, they all have secrets, and we quickly realise we can't trust anyone. Then Twohy starts layering in flashbacks to fill in the back-stories, up to an extended black and white sequence that sorts out the loose ends and sets things up for the frantic, action-charged climax.The first half of the film builds the atmosphere perfectly, establishing the characters with economy thanks to a clever script and an especially strong cast. Zahn and Jovovich are play against type effectively, and are terrific as the hapless lovebirds, while Olyplant and Sanchez are superb as their edgy new buddies. So by the time things start going nuts, everyone can generate jolts and humour at exactly the right moments.And boy do things get nuts. Not in any inventively unhinged way, but in the standard movie style of building to impossibly big action set pieces and then twisting them slightly, pausing for half a breath and then carrying on full speed. The gruesome, frenetic last act is utterly over-the-top, but still manages to be entertaining simply because it's so preposterous, and because we've come to like being around these characters who are now in a battle for their lives. And by the end, we've completely forgotten to care about all the gaping plot holes.

Land Of The Lost Review


Good
Apparently you can drink dinosaur urine, almost kiss a monkey-child hybrid, and pass through a T. Rex's digestive tract as part of a mainstream Hollywood comedy and still receive a PG-13 rating from the MPAA. Who would've guessed?

Those are but two of the many strange (and yes, strangely funny) things Will Ferrell does in Brad Silberling's Land of the Lost, an acid-trip take on Sid and Marty Krofft's already kitschy television series that aired on NBC in the mid-'70s. Ferrell tones down his trademark immaturity but ramps up the crippling ego to play Dr. Rick Marshall, a scientist focused on unraveling time travel who's discredited after a televised spat with Today show host Matt Lauer (convincing as himself).

Continue reading: Land Of The Lost Review

The International Review


Excellent
Tom Tykwer's The International can trace its bloodline back to the paranoia peddlers of the 1970s --- think The Parallax View or Three Days of the Condor -- but benefits tremendously from our current predicaments. After all, can you think of a better time to open a globetrotting thriller that casts a morally bankrupt financial institution in the villainous role?

This isn't just any bank behaving badly, though. The fictitious International Bank of Business and Credit is a global (yet eerily faceless) entity with employees who are experts at covering the shadow organization's tracks. When necessary, the IBBC can make court records, police documents, and even people disappear. The IBBC established its wealth laundering money for terrorist groups and organized criminals. Now it's bidding to broker a major arms deal with China that would supply weapons to Middle Eastern military factions.

Continue reading: The International Review

The Express Review


Good
Ernie Davis made the most of his too-brief life.

Football came naturally to the Pennsylvania native, and it was on the gridiron where he cemented his identity. A gifted running back, Davis was recruited by the great Jim Brown to play for coach Ben Schwartzwalder at Syracuse University. While an Orangeman, Davis earned MVP honors at the Cotton Bowl in 1960 and the Liberty Bowl in '61. Later that year, Davis became the first African-American to win the Heisman Trophy. The Washington Redskins used their first pick in the 1962 draft on Davis (though the team immediately traded him to the Cleveland Browns). But in 1963, before playing a single down in the National Football League, Davis died of leukemia at the age of 23.

Continue reading: The Express Review

Death Race Review


Terrible
Movies like Death Race exist so critics will have something to put on their year-end "Worst Of" lists.

Technically, it's a remake of Paul Bartel's schlocky Death Race 2000 from 1975. But director Paul W.S. Anderson also uses his gig as an excuse to revisit every innocent-man-behind-bars cliché that has been introduced from then 'til now.

Continue reading: Death Race Review

Gridiron Gang Review


Good

Wanna know why sports movies are criticized for being too cliché? Because sports, as a whole, are too cliché. We've been trained to root for the underdog, though it's conventional when that come-from-behind victory is shown on screen. Teams are expected to win games on last-play drives. How is a filmmaker supposed to wring suspense from such a scenario when it happens every night on SportsCenter?

For a sports film to succeed on its own terms, audiences must be able to look beyond the requisite storytelling crutches that bolster this limited genre and find something else worth discussing. In Gridiron Gang, that extra something else is heart, which this flick has in spades.

Gang follows the biographical story of Sean Porter to the letter - footage of the real coach played alongside the end credits shows him barking actual lines we heard minutes before in the film. Charismatically intimidating Dwayne "The Rock" Johnson personifies Porter, a juvenile correctional facilities counselor who uses football as a means to unite his divided charges.

Gang plays as a junior varsity Longest Yard, with hardened teenage criminals learning to shelve their street-bred differences and play together as a team. It shows these kids at rock bottom so we can best appreciate how Porter and his program brings them back up.

Instead of one game against the guards, these kids shoulder a full season against polished private squads. Rock wears many hats both on the field and off - counselor, coach, bouncer, mentor, friend - and each one fits him like a glove. The wrestler continues to find projects that utilize his physical assets, as well as his rugged charm.

The underdog formula gets the better of director Phil Joanou (State of Grace), who pushes our buttons hard but manages to motivate without fully manipulating. He could stand to trust his audience more than he does. Most can figure when to stand and cheer without obvious cues from Trevor Rabin's desperate score. Also, Joanou adores slow-motion photography for his in-game shots. Not one or two shots, but every single frame of football action. If these sequences were played at full speed, Gang would be 30 minutes shorter, and the reduction in running time would help.

As it stands, the gritty Gang delivers last-second heroics, surprising amounts of humor, and the beating heart of an unexpected champion. Let's put it into football terms. This motivational cheerer isn't a flashy wide receiver or a star quarterback. It's the stocky, reliable running back who drops his shoulder, breaks a few tackles, and picks up tough yards on the way to a moral victory.

The DVD includes deleted scenes, commentary track, making-of featurettes, and a multi-angle feature.

He will rock you.

Gridiron Gang Review


Good

Wanna know why sports movies are criticized for being too cliché? Because sports, as a whole, are too cliché. We've been trained to root for the underdog, though it's conventional when that come-from-behind victory is shown on screen. Teams are expected to win games on last-play drives. How is a filmmaker supposed to wring suspense from such a scenario when it happens every night on SportsCenter?

For a sports film to succeed on its own terms, audiences must be able to look beyond the requisite storytelling crutches that bolster this limited genre and find something else worth discussing. In Gridiron Gang, that extra something else is heart, which this flick has in spades.

Gang follows the biographical story of Sean Porter to the letter - footage of the real coach played alongside the end credits shows him barking actual lines we heard minutes before in the film. Charismatically intimidating Dwayne "The Rock" Johnson personifies Porter, a juvenile correctional facilities counselor who uses football as a means to unite his divided charges.

Continue reading: Gridiron Gang Review

The Fast And The Furious: Tokyo Drift Review


Good
The Fast and the Furious: Tokyo Drift plays like the archetypal Western. A newcomer arrives in town, upsets the locals, plays with hearts, and rides around a lot before a final "this town ain't big enough for the both of us" showdown sends him, or someone else, on their way. Of course, the movie is actually an Eastern: The frontier is Japan, the town is big enough for about 20 million, and there is plenty of horsepower, but not a mare or stallion in sight. Despite the setting, the basic principles remain unchanged. The stranger, Sean Boswell (Lucas Black) is an Alabaman High School student, sent away to live with his seafaring father (Brian Goodman) in Tokyo after getting in trouble with the law back home. It seems Sean can't stop racing cars. Unfortunately, for unknowing parents, the wild wild East of Japan is a paradise for the boy from the west, with its underground racing culture and scantily clad sirens, and soon Sean finds himself tangled in the criminal engine of his dangerous new town.In Tokyo, Sean meets Twinkie (Bow Wow), an iPod-dealing "army brat" who introduces him to the city's racing underworld. Every night, groups of outrageously dressed young people take their outrageously painted cars out for some dynamically orchestrated races. The Yakuza (Japanese mafia) is heavily involved in the races, and the Drift King, DK (Brian Tee), is high up in their ranks. Of course, in grand Point Break (and, um, Fast and the Furious) tradition, Sean takes a liking to DK's girl, Neela (Nathalie Kelley), causing DK to take an extreme disliking to Sean. The two race, and the newcomer loses. However, DK's business partner and seeming sage, Han (Sung Kang), sees a spark in the kid, and vows to train him in the ancient Japanese art of drifting (driving sideways). All Sean has to in return, is run a few criminal errands.To describe the plot of The Fast and the Furious: Tokyo Drift is more effort than it's worth (and possibly more effort than it took to come up with). Plot, dialogue, character development: All are irrelevant. What clearly matters to the filmmakers, and one suspects, to those contemplating a trip to the theatre to see it, is the sound and fury of the thing. On this level, Justin Lin's film is a grand achievement. Every race and chase is brilliantly handled. The concept of drifting, really just a fancy name for a movement we've all seen before, is nonetheless utilized to breathtaking effect. When Sean races DK down a windy mountain road, both cars drifting dangerously close to an off-road disaster, Lin's camera plummets and whips around, itself racing and demonstrating the consequences of any potential mishaps. He is a director with an innovative eye suited to this kinetic material.Unfortunately, where the eye is strong, the ear is weak. Alfredo Botello, Chris Morgan and Kario Salem's screenplay is a paint-by-numbers job that fails even to color effectively within the lines. The script is woeful. There are attempts at exposition, humor and development, all of which fail and act merely as speed bumps for a film otherwise moving well. The most hilarious scene involves a rooftop discussion between Han and Sean, supposed to establish their bond and some bizarre driver philosophy, that instead sets itself up for instant parody.Despite its execrable screenplay, some dull performances (although it must be said that Black can scowl with the best of them), and failure on nearly almost every level but the action, Tokyo Drift still manages to kind of work. The racing scenes are that good and that frequent that one can almost forgive everything else. It's a Western: We know it's junk; we just want the showdown. On this level, the film provides. It is not as good as a certain other movie about "cars" currently playing, but then that movie hit on a fundamental point. It let the cars, not the people, do the talking. Looking at Twinkie's green Hulk car, I couldn't help but let my mind drift, and think, "Ahhh, if these cars could talk...."They went thattaway.
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Ryan Kavanaugh Movies

Earth to Echo Movie Review

Earth to Echo Movie Review

The filmmakers behind this pre-teen adventure admit that they were trying to combine the magic...

3 Days to Kill Movie Review

3 Days to Kill Movie Review

French filmmaker Luc Besson continues to combine family themes with intense violence (see Taken), but...

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Out of the Furnace Movie Review

Out of the Furnace Movie Review

Coarse and not exactly subtle, this dark drama might disappoint viewers expecting a more traditional...

The Family Movie Review

The Family Movie Review

Despite a promising trailer and a great cast, this French-American comedy-thriller is a complete misfire...

21 and Over Movie Review

21 and Over Movie Review

The writers of The Hangover stick with the same formula for this university-aged romp about...

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Movie 43 Movie Review

Movie 43 Movie Review

A collection of random shorts that focus mainly on idiotic male behaviour, this portmanteau comedy...

Mirror Mirror Movie Review

Mirror Mirror Movie Review

Both lavishly produced and light-hearted in tone, this fractured fairy tale aspires to be The...

Immortals Movie Review

Immortals Movie Review

Like 300 on acid, this outrageously violent Greek mythology epic bludgeons us into submission as...

Take Me Home Tonight Movie Review

Take Me Home Tonight Movie Review

He built his name on That '70s Show, and now Topher Grace stars in, produces...

Limitless Movie Review

Limitless Movie Review

Despite a rather incomplete premise, this sleek thriller barrels full-steam through its plot. It's involving...

Sanctum Movie Review

Sanctum Movie Review

Inspired by a true story and executive produced by underwater-film fanatic James Cameron, this cave-diving...

The Fighter Movie Review

The Fighter Movie Review

Director Russell significantly ups his game with this visceral drama based on the true story...

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