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Rufus Sewell and Beverly Hilton Hotel Thursday 8th November 2012 BAFTA Los Angeles 2012 Britannia Awards Presented by BBC America held at Beverly Hilton Hotel

Rufus Sewell and Beverly Hilton Hotel
Rufus Sewell and Beverly Hilton Hotel

Rufus Sewell - Rufus Sewell and guest Monday 18th June 2012 Twentieth Century Fox Presents The Premiere of Abraham Lincoln Vampire Hunter at AMC Loews Lincoln Square

Rufus Sewell
Rufus Sewell
Rufus Sewell
Rufus Sewell
Rufus Sewell
Rufus Sewell

Rufus Sewell Monday 18th June 2012 Rufus Sewell greets fans and signs autographs outside his New York hotel

Rufus Sewell

Jessica Chastain and Rufus Sewell - Jessica Chastain, Next Future Icon winner and Rufus Sewell Monday 13th February 2012 The Elle Style Awards 2012 held at The Savoy - Press Room

Jessica Chastain and Rufus Sewell
Jessica Chastain and Rufus Sewell
Jessica Chastain
Jessica Chastain
Jessica Chastain
Jessica Chastain

Rufus Sewell Monday 13th February 2012 ELLE Style Awards held at the Savoy - Arrivals.

Rufus Sewell
Rufus Sewell

Rufus Sewell and Golden Globe Friday 13th January 2012 W Magazine's 69th Annual Golden Globe Awards Celebration - Arrivals

Rufus Sewell and Golden Globe
Rufus Sewell and Golden Globe

Rufus Sewell and BAFTA Saturday 17th September 2011 9th Annual BAFTA Los Angeles Tea Party - Arrivals

Rufus Sewell and Bafta
Rufus Sewell and Bafta
Rufus Sewell and Bafta
Rufus Sewell and Bafta

Rufus Sewell - Monday 6th December 2010 at Ziegfeld Theatre New York City, USA

Rufus Sewell
Rufus Sewell
Rufus Sewell
Rufus Sewell
Rufus Sewell
Rufus Sewell

Rufus Sewell - Monday 20th April 2009 at Paramount Studios Los Angeles, California

Rufus Sewell
Rufus Sewell

Rufus Sewell Saturday 20th September 2008 Entertainment Weekly's 6th Annual Pre-Emmy Celebration honouring The 2008 Emmy Nominees at The Beverly Hills Post Office Los Angeles, California

Rufus Sewell
Rufus Sewell

Dark City Review


Extraordinary
For all of the acclaim Dark City received after its initial, disastrous theatrical release in 1998 -- movie-of-the-year and DVD commentary honors from Roger Ebert; cult adoration; an eventual director's cut -- it probably still hasn't reached anywhere close to the number of people who saw, say, The Matrix (released just about a year later). Perhaps this has to do with the way the film shrouds its ideas in noir mystery rather than cyberpunk fashion; if The Matrix turned a broad audience into geeks who wanted to know kung fu, Dark City seemed ready-made for those whose geekery was established, though the film is broad enough to welcome nerds of the film, sci-fi, and perhaps even architecture varieties.

The Matrix is not a random comparison, mind you; the two films toy with similar ideas about the meaning of humanity, memory, and self-perception (they also share a second-unit director, though unless he is a brilliant stealth screenwriter, it is probably a coincidence). Dark City, directed by Alex Proyas, is less thrilling and sleek than its cousin, but equally imaginative, full of twisty images and clever synthesis of the movies that inspired it. It gives geeks a good name.

Continue reading: Dark City Review

Dark City Review


Extraordinary
For all of the acclaim Dark City received after its initial, disastrous theatrical release in 1998 -- movie-of-the-year and DVD commentary honors from Roger Ebert; cult adoration; an eventual director's cut -- it probably still hasn't reached anywhere close to the number of people who saw, say, The Matrix (released just about a year later). Perhaps this has to do with the way the film shrouds its ideas in noir mystery rather than cyberpunk fashion; if The Matrix turned a broad audience into geeks who wanted to know kung fu, Dark City seemed ready-made for those whose geekery was established, though the film is broad enough to welcome nerds of the film, sci-fi, and perhaps even architecture varieties.

The Matrix is not a random comparison, mind you; the two films toy with similar ideas about the meaning of humanity, memory, and self-perception (they also share a second-unit director, though unless he is a brilliant stealth screenwriter, it is probably a coincidence). Dark City, directed by Alex Proyas, is less thrilling and sleek than its cousin, but equally imaginative, full of twisty images and clever synthesis of the movies that inspired it. It gives geeks a good name.

Continue reading: Dark City Review

Rufus Sewell Friday 18th July 2008 CBS, CW and Showtime Press Tour Stars Party at Boulevard 3 Los Angeles, California

Rufus Sewell
Rufus Sewell

John Adams Review


Excellent
The mammoth success of David McCullough's John Adams (2001) was one of publishing's great shockers. How could a lengthy hardcover about America's least glamorous founding father sell so many copies?

It wasn't the Pulitzer that moved units. It was McCullough's storytelling which transformed Adams' life from a forgotten textbook paragraph to something deserving of a big-budget, seven-part HBO epic.

Continue reading: John Adams Review

Rufus Sewell - Sunday 15th June 2008 at Radio City Music Hall New York City, USA

Rufus Sewell

Rufus Sewell - Wednesday 14th May 2008 at Tony Awards New York City, USA

Rufus Sewell
Rufus Sewell
Rufus Sewell

Rufus Sewell - Monday 10th March 2008 at Beverly Hilton Hotel Los Angeles, California

Rufus Sewell
Rufus Sewell
Rufus Sewell
Rufus Sewell

Rufus Sewell - Monday 21st January 2008 at Sundance Film Festival Park City, Utah

Rufus Sewell
Rufus Sewell
Rufus Sewell and Vanity Fair
Rufus Sewell

Paris, Je T'aime Review


Good
One would like to think that there at least a few other cities in the world besides Paris that could have inspired a film as varied in the types of cinematic pleasure so ably delivered by the anthology piece Paris Je T'Aime -- but it seems unlikely. This isn't due to an unavailability of good stories or locations in many other great metropolises, but more because being able to dangle the possibility of shooting in Paris in front of the world's greatest directors is going to be so much more enticing. Also, there are few other cities besides Paris that come with such a powerful and multifarious wealth of preassociated images and emotions for both filmmaker and audience to both draw upon and react against. So what could have been a collection of short films with a few highs, several lows, and a lot of muddled in-betweens is in fact a remarkably and consistently imaginative body of work, practically giddy with energy, that only rarely touches the ground.

Project overseers Emmanuel Benbihy and Tristan Carné wanted to create a cinematic map of Paris, with each short film representing one of the city's 20 arrondissements (neighborhoods). They ended up with 18 films, none of them more than a few minutes long and directed by a glittering, international roster of filmmakers. While none of the films here are anything approaching masterpieces, hardly a one is in any way a chore to sit through, which has to be some sort of an accomplishment.

Continue reading: Paris, Je T'aime Review

The Illusionist Review


Weak
There's something in Paul Giamatti that was just made for the 19th century. With those slightly bulbous but penetrating eyes and stolid weariness, one can imagine him looking out of an old daguerreotype with hat in hand, an emblem of a less superficial age. So it's nice to see Giamatti (so often made to play the whiny comic relief) cast in the otherwise dismissible film The Illusionist as a gruff policeman in fin de siècle Vienna, dropping his voice into a lower register than usual and assuming an impressive stature; honorable but shaded with a tiny bit of incipient corruption. If only everything else in the film worked this well.

Based on a short story by Steven Millhauser, a Pulitzer winner given to tidy exposition and nostalgic settings, The Illusionist concerns a stage magician who was separated from the love of his love due to his peasant roots and her aristocratic family, only to meet her years later on stage, when she is betrothed to a villainous crown prince. The magician, Eisenheim, is played stiffly by Edward Norton, without a shred of humor or self-awareness. Somewhat in keeping with his performance is that by Jessica Biel as his beloved, Sophie von Teschen -- whose beauty helps brighten these lamp-lit rooms, but who is never close to believable as a Viennese noblewoman. Rather more in keeping with the spirit of the rather melodramatic story is Rufus Sewell, as the evil Crown Prince Leopold, who swans through the film with cigarette holder perched lightly in one hand, his face a deliciously, maliciously bored mask.

Continue reading: The Illusionist Review

The Holiday Review


Good
Nancy Meyers officially displaces Sleepless in Seattle director Nora Ephron as the crown-wearing queen of winsome, middle-concept romantic comedies.

Granted, the writer-director has been staffing a cache of headstrong and heartfelt female characters since she penned Private Benjamin in 1980. But it's the back-to-back-to-back musings of What Women Want, Something's Gotta Give, and her current affair The Holiday that elevate her to the summit of palatable sap.

Continue reading: The Holiday Review

Tristan & Isolde Review


Excellent
Kevin Reynolds is one of Hollywood's most unjustly maligned filmmakers. I'm frequently astounded by the fact that his superior craftsmanship is not more widely recognized. Surely his attention to detail and sensual prowess is equal that of championed filmmakers like Ridley and Tony Scott (who both produced this film).

I suspect that most of this disregard is due to the fact that more often than not Reynolds' films are burdened with clunky and sentimental scripts. Films like Rapa Nui and Robin Hood: Prince of Thieves were gorgeously shot and produced but weighed down by melodrama and hobbled by sentimentality. And then there was the whole Waterworld debacle from which it seems Reynolds has never really recovered. The Count of Monte Cristo was a start, but this is the film that should bring Reynolds back to the table. (I happen to think Waterworld is fantastically accomplished and enormously entertaining but don't tell anyone I said that.)

Continue reading: Tristan & Isolde Review

The Legend Of Zorro Review


Good
The Legend of Zorro is sure to please those who dug the fancy swordplay and acrobatics of The Mask of Zorro. For those who enjoyed the 1998 summer hit for the romantic byplay between co-stars Antonio Banderas and then-unknown Catherine Zeta-Jones -- as well as the sheer absurdity of Anthony Hopkins playing a Hispanic -- well the recently released special edition DVD will do just nicely.

The sequel picks up 10 years later in 1850, where lovers Alejandro (Banderas) and Elena (Zeta-Jones, again convincing everyone she's not European) are now married. Alejandro is still working around the clock as Zorro to help the oppressed of California, a situation Elena is none too pleased with since she feels he's neglecting his family. After an especially nasty argument with Elena, Alejandro leaves his estate to get some space and to save some more peasant families. Several days later, he's handed divorce papers and a reason to start drinking.

Continue reading: The Legend Of Zorro Review

Cold Comfort Farm Review


Excellent
Clever and funny English country dramady about an orphan (Beckinsale, in a radiant debut that has gone downhill ever since), who is sent to live with her insane relatives on Cold Comfort Farm. Grows better with each viewing.

Illuminata Review


Weak
The art of acting is fascinating and mysterious, even for the actors who practice it. Unfortunately, for many artists, acting is too fascinating, and they can't resist the temptation to over-analyze it and to make plays/films about it. Playwright Brandon Cole and actor-director John Turturro, creators of Illuminata, are the latest to succumb.

Turturro plays a dramatist, Tuccio, struggling to make his name in the Manhattan theater scene at the turn of the century. Tuccio uses the unexpected illness of an actor (played by Matthew Sussman) to convince the owners of a Manhattan theater to chance his play, Illuminata. Unfortunately, that is not only the movie's premise, but also most of the plot.

Continue reading: Illuminata Review

A Knight's Tale Review


Very Good
I was initially skeptical, to say the least, to hear the premise of A Knight's Tale, which, for the uninitiated, is thus: Classic tale of squires and swords is set to a loud, classic rock score. Sounds like Rocky Horror at best, Evita at worst. Fortunately, A Knight's Tale comes in on the high side of would-be rock operas (would-be because there's not actually any singing in the movie, just a lot of dancing; on the high side because they usually suck) thanks to its odd mixture of silly fun with bone-crushing action scenes.

How do you mix a 1400s tale of jousting and swordplay with a load of rock music? Very carefully. It all starts as a crowd chants the opening monologue to "We Will Rock You" at the lists of a small jousting tournament, while our squire hero Will (Heath Ledger) finds that his master, a knight on the verge of winning the tourney, has just died. In a fit of passion, he straps on his master's armor and rides into the arena, winning the tournament for he and his two co-squire friends (Mark Addy and Alan Tudyk). Thrilled with the victory, Will opts not to take the money and split, but instead assumes the identity of a phony knight, rockin' and joustin' his way across France en route to "The World Championships" of jousting in London.

Continue reading: A Knight's Tale Review

Victory Review


Weak
Fairly pedantic and plodding, this period piece, set in 1913 in the Dutch East Indies (ah, I remember the Dutch East Indies...), this film has all the makings of a sultry romance (think The Piano) but never amounts to much more than a watery day-trip.

The convoluted story has a female violinist (Irène Jacob) shanghaied from her indentured servitude by a semi-wealthy island-dweller (Willem Dafoe). Naturally, the woman's owner becomes a bit miffed and sends some goons (including Rufus Sewell and Sam Neill in a rare bad-guy role) after them. Imagine the hijinks!

Continue reading: Victory Review

The Very Thought Of You Review


Very Good
Nearly overwhelming in its cuteness, The Very Thought of You tells the wholly unlikely story of an American (Potter) on the run from her unbearably dull life. When she flies to London on a lark, she encounters three British guys in the space of 48 hours, all of whom fall in love with her immediately. The catch? The three are all best friends.

Joseph Fiennes is the lovable one of the bunch, and naturally he and Potter are destined for one another. But Fiennes' friendship with his two pals (Sewell and Hollander) keeps him a dark horse in the game. Will he go for the girl or not? And what will she do when she finds out they're all pals?

Continue reading: The Very Thought Of You Review

Bless The Child Review


Bad
Yes, August is upon us and with it comes the second appearance of the twice-yearly dumping ground for Hollywood. Like the February doldrums, August brings us films filled with fading stars and awful storylines that weren't deemed good enough to break even after a big summer marketing campaign, nor will they be able to go toe to toe with meatier fare during Oscar season.

And to open August, enter Bless the Child, possibly the worst movie I've seen this year. Well, after Mission to Mars.

Continue reading: Bless The Child Review

A Man Of No Importance Review


Very Good
Long-awaited and highly-acclaimed, A Man of No Importance has crawled into town for a limited run. In the film, Albert Finney plays Alfie Byrne, a 1960 Dublin bus director who is obsessed with Oscar Wilde and directs an annual staging of one of his plays with a cast composed of his bus's passengers.

As if that weren't enough, Alfie, stricken by "the love that dare not speak its name," is constantly at war with his emotions and his sexuality, and he is painfully infatuated with the bus's driver, Robbie (Rufus Sewell). As the annual play draws near, a new rider, Adele (well-played by Tara Fitzgerald) shows up, and Alfie decides to cast her as the virginal lead in Wilde's controversial Salome.

Continue reading: A Man Of No Importance Review

She Creature Review


OK
Where did this very strange movie come from? Certainly it was never in theaters... which might be explained by its plot oddity, about a couple (Rufus Sewell and Carla Gugino) who encounters a captive mermaid and figures she might be their ticket out of the land of low-rent carnies. Oh, and it's a period piece and a psychological thriller of sorts. Utterly baffling, it's still oddly watchable if for no other reason than to try to figure out what accent that is that Gugino is trying to emulate during her many monologues.

Continue reading: She Creature Review

Extreme Ops Review


Zero

I can't remember the last time I saw worse stunt editing or cheaper action movie production values than in "Extreme Ops," a virtually plotless snowboarders-vs.-terrorists waste of celluloid, so feeble in every way that its only entertainment value is in snickering at the characters' supposedly uber-hip hairstyles.

Cue-card-quality, glazed-eyed, 20-nothing actor Devon Sawa (who looks as if he's spent the two years since "Final Destination" eating donuts and smoking dope) sports a do that resembles dozens of shellacked, broken chopsticks glued to his head. Giggly Angeline Jolie look-alike Jana Pallaske is supposed to be some kind of rocker "grrrl" (her punk band intro scene is so badly dubbed you'd think she was in a Godzilla movie) but the extent of her street chick cred is a few streaks of blue in her hair.

Both play daredevil snowboarders/skiers hired by a TV commercial director (Rufus Sewell, "A Knight's Tale") to fly to Austria and outrun an avalanche for a camcorder advertisement. But when they arrive at their location -- a half-finished mountaintop resort -- they run afoul of generically scruffy Eastern European terrorists using the place as a hideout. Now they must extreme-board for their lives.

Continue reading: Extreme Ops Review

Bless The Child Review


Terrible

Re-enforcing their stuck-in-B-list status, Kim Basinger and Jimmy Smits star this week in a laughably gothic second-coming chiller, "Bless the Child," which once again commandeers Catholic dogma as a jumping-off point for a half-witted, high-gloss horror movie.

Like "Stigmata" and "End of Days" before it, "Bless the Child" invents its own "previously undiscovered" Biblical mythology to propel its story about a battle for the soul of an abandoned 6-year-old girl (Holliston Coleman) named Cody, who -- it is implied -- is the reincarnation of Christ.

Kim Basinger plays her aunt Maggie, a New York City psychiatric nurse who's strung-out younger sister (Angela Bettis, "Girl Interrupted") drops the infant girl on her doorstep and disappears. Maggie -- an agnostic, as all religious chiller heroes are at first -- raises Cody and gradually begins to realize (much more gradually than the audience) that the child has supernatural gifts. Rocking back and forth while ain't-it-eerie monk chants reverberate on the soundtrack, Cody makes plates spin with telekinetic power, lights candles just by staring at them intently and brings back to life pigeons that smack into windows.

Continue reading: Bless The Child Review

Rufus Sewell

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Rufus Sewell

Date of birth

29th October, 1967

Occupation

Actor

Sex

Male

Height

1.83


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Rufus Sewell Movies

Blinky Bill The Movie Trailer

Blinky Bill The Movie Trailer

Blinky Bill has always considered himself an explorer, the kind of Koala that's willing to...

Gods of Egypt Movie Review

Gods of Egypt Movie Review

With a massive scale and a digital cast of thousands, this ancient Egyptian romp tries...

Gods Of Egypt Trailer

Gods Of Egypt Trailer

When Set brutally murderers his brother, Osiris the great deities of ancient Egypt are upset,...

Hercules Movie Review

Hercules Movie Review

Far more entertaining than it has any right to be, this is a big, messy...

Hercules Trailer

Hercules Trailer

Following his deadly ordeal of being put through the Twelve Labours by his father Zeus...

The Sea Trailer

The Sea Trailer

Max Morden is an art historian who's determined to re-discover his own history following the...

Hercules - Trailer Trailer

Hercules - Trailer Trailer

Hercules is a bitter and haunted demi-god filled with resentment for the people and the...

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All Things to All Men Movie Review

All Things to All Men Movie Review

Sadly, there has been such a glut of gun-packed London crime thrillers, that it simply...

Abraham Lincoln: Vampire Hunter Movie Review

Abraham Lincoln: Vampire Hunter Movie Review

A riotous combination of rah-rah American patriotism and overwrought special effects nonsense, this cheeky bit...

Abraham Lincoln: Vampire Hunter Trailer

Abraham Lincoln: Vampire Hunter Trailer

As a boy, Abraham Lincoln learns from his father, Thomas, that vampires are real. Worse...

The Tourist Movie Review

The Tourist Movie Review

This is a thoroughly offbeat concoction from the gifted filmmaker behind the acclaimed The Lives...

The Tourist Trailer

The Tourist Trailer

Most people wouldn't travel to Venice Italy - considered by many to be one of...

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