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Gods Of Egypt Review

Good

With a massive scale and a digital cast of thousands, this ancient Egyptian romp tries to be both a new version of those 1950s Biblical toga epics and a generous dose of camp silliness. The result will be a guilty pleasure for some in the audience, especially those who enjoy watching grown men leap around in short skirts. The actors are sometimes lost in the overwhelming animation, and the casting of Westerners as North Africans is more than a little dubious. But the script is smarter than it looks, and director Alex Proyas is clearly in a playful mood.

The premise conflates the golden age of the Pharaohs with the ancient world of Egyptian gods. And things kick off when the bitter god Set (Gerard Butler) launches a reign of terror by killing his brother, blinding his nephew Horus (Nokolaj Coster-Waldau) and taking over the mortal world, enslaving all humans. Horus' greatest fan is the muscly slave Bek (Brenton Thwaites) who, encouraged by his glamorous girlfriend Zaya (Courtney Eaton), sneaks into Set's palace and steals one of Horus' eyes. He then strikes a deal to help Horus assume his rightful throne. But this means travelling into the sky to confront his grandfather Ra (Geoffrey Rush), then teaming up with sneering god of wisdom Thoth (Chadwick Boseman) and duplicitous Hathor (Yung) to take on Set.

All of this is so ridiculous that it's difficult to stop giggling. And that seems to be part of the idea, as Proyas merrily cranks up the snarky wit in every scene, especially as he indulges in a series of ludicrous set-pieces that feel like videogames populated by toy action figures. The digital effects continually engulf the characters, transforming the gods inexplicably into animal-headed metallic robots. But they also create some genuinely gorgeous moments of spectacle, with sprawling landscapes and whooshing action. Basically, the actors have little choice but to hang on for the ride along with the audience.

Continue reading: Gods Of Egypt Review

Rufus Sewell - Rufus Sewell pictured arriving at the Radio 2 studio at BBC Western House - London, United Kingdom - Tuesday 9th February 2016

Rufus Sewell
Rufus Sewell
Rufus Sewell

Beau Flynn, Aksel Hennie, Reece Ritchie, Ian McShane, Ingrid Bolso Berdal, Dwayne Johnson, Irina Shayk, Rufus Sewell and Brett Ratner - European premiere of 'Hercules' at CineStar IMAX im Sony Center in Berlin - Arrivals - Berlin, Germany - Thursday 21st August 2014

Beau Flynn, Aksel Hennie, Reece Ritchie, Ian Mcshane, Ingrid Bolso Berdal, Dwayne Johnson, Irina Shayk, Rufus Sewell and Brett Ratner
Beau Flynn, Aksel Hennie, Reece Ritchie, Ian Mcshane, Ingrid Bolso Berdal, Dwayne Johnson, Irina Shayk, Rufus Sewell and Brett Ratner
Beau Flynn, Aksel Hennie, Reece Ritchie, Ian Mcshane, Ingrid Bolso Berdal, Dwayne Johnson, Irina Shayk, Rufus Sewell and Brett Ratner

Ami Kamal and Rufus Sewell - Los Angeles premiere of 'Hercules' - Afterparty held at the Roosevelt Hotel on Hollywood Boulevard - Hollywood, California, United States - Thursday 24th July 2014

Ami Kamal and Rufus Sewell
Rufus Sewell and Ami Kamal
Rufus Sewell
Rufus Sewell
Rufus Sewell and Ami Kamal
Rufus Sewell

Hercules - Extended Trailer


Following his deadly ordeal of being put through the Twelve Labours by his father Zeus and his people, all Hercules wants from life is to rest quietly with a loving family. Unfortunately for him, now is not the time for resting as the gods have delivered another bout of chaos to the world. Being well known by all as a man with all the strength of a god, Hercules is forced to lead a battle against a new menace as the King of Thrace gets him and some like minded warriors to band together as the world's most formidable army. They must defeat a powerful rival general as the vicious descendents of Hades infect the land. It's a deadly mission, the minions of hell being immortal and ruthless, and their defeat can only be accomplished by someone with power above the mortal realm.

Continue: Hercules - Extended Trailer

Video - Rufus Sewell And Carla Gugino Arrive At The 'Hotel Noir' NY Premiere


Photographers snap famous faces as they arrive outside the 'Hotel Noir' New York premiere. Among them are the movie's stars Rufus Sewell and Carla Gugino, Blondie singer Debbie Harry, fashion designer Marc Jacobs, 'Batman Forever' director Joel Schumacher, 'The Real Housewives of New York City' star Carole Radziwill, the wife of Mick Jones from Foreigner Ann Dexter-Jones, models Iman Abdulmajid and Marcus Schenkenberg and stylists Jay Manuel and June Ambrose.

Continue: Video - Rufus Sewell And Carla Gugino Arrive At The 'Hotel Noir' NY Premiere

Rufus Sewell Friday 9th November 2012 attends the Gato Negro Films & the Cinema Society screening of Hotel Noir at the Crosby Hotel

Rufus Sewell
Rufus Sewell

Rufus Sewell and Beverly Hilton Hotel Thursday 8th November 2012 BAFTA Los Angeles 2012 Britannia Awards Presented by BBC America held at Beverly Hilton Hotel

Rufus Sewell and Beverly Hilton Hotel
Rufus Sewell and Beverly Hilton Hotel

Rufus Sewell - Rufus Sewell and guest Monday 18th June 2012 Twentieth Century Fox Presents The Premiere of Abraham Lincoln Vampire Hunter at AMC Loews Lincoln Square

Rufus Sewell
Rufus Sewell
Rufus Sewell
Rufus Sewell
Rufus Sewell
Rufus Sewell

Rufus Sewell Monday 18th June 2012 Rufus Sewell greets fans and signs autographs outside his New York hotel

Rufus Sewell

Abraham Lincoln: Vampire Hunter Trailer


As a boy, Abraham Lincoln learns from his father, Thomas, that vampires are real. Worse still, it was vampires that took the life of Abe's mother, Nancy, rather than 'milk sickness' as he previously believed. The news, understandably, shocks Abraham, who vows to avenge his mother and hunt down and kill vampires.

Continue: Abraham Lincoln: Vampire Hunter Trailer

Jessica Chastain and Rufus Sewell - Jessica Chastain, Next Future Icon winner and Rufus Sewell Monday 13th February 2012 The Elle Style Awards 2012 held at The Savoy - Press Room

Jessica Chastain and Rufus Sewell
Jessica Chastain and Rufus Sewell
Jessica Chastain
Jessica Chastain
Jessica Chastain
Jessica Chastain

Rufus Sewell Monday 13th February 2012 ELLE Style Awards held at the Savoy - Arrivals.

Rufus Sewell
Rufus Sewell

Vinyan Review


Weak
A vivid example of style over substance, this textured film creates an overwhelming sense of emotion and dread, but never manages to find a point to it all. It merely gives into the grisliness, leaving us shaken and unstirred.

Six months after their son was killed in a tsunami, Janet and Paul (Beart and Sewell) are still living in Phuket nursing their grief. But Janet is convinced that he must be alive and living up-river in Burma, so convinces Paul to fund a desperate expedition. Their first guide (Pankratok) is a bit of a crook, but they soon link with Thaksin (Osthanugrah) and another expat, Kim (Dreyfus). And the further they venture into this strange region, the more bizarre things get.

Continue reading: Vinyan Review

Downloading Nancy Review


Bad
Maria Bello's world-weary seriousness and plainly-bared sexuality have been put to excellent use in movies like The Cooler and A History of Violence, exploring relationships fraught with wounded desperation and suspicion. Given the existence of these films, Downloading Nancy counts as an abuse of trust. This is not to say that this dark, sexually-explicit picture achieves anywhere near its intended level of provocation. Instead, it leads its actors down a dank alleyway, slowly, with maximum pretension and minimal payoff.

Bello bares her soul, or someone's fumbling interpretation of same, as Nancy, a woman who suffered abuse as a child and is now stuck in a non-abusive but stifling marriage with Albert (Rufus Sewell); she can only feel through pain. Somehow this is meant to relate to the internet, where Nancy, it's implied, spends most of her time and forms her only real relationships, though this all remains largely undramatized. (And not to get too literal, but no one in this movie downloads a damn thing apart from some email).

Continue reading: Downloading Nancy Review

Vinyan Review


OK
Coming on the heels of the spellbinding backwoods horror flick Calvaire, Belgian filmmaker Fabrice Du Welz's Vinyan is an incredibly intense and, sadly, obtuse third-world metaphysical thriller that is bound to disappoint less discriminating viewers. Maybe even discriminating ones.

Ostensibly a mash-up of tsunami-inspired tragedy and Lord of the Flies-styled allegory, Vinyan opens with an Anglo couple, Paul (Rufus Sewell) and Jeanne (Emmanuelle Béart), living on the Thai coast and trying to get on with their lives six months after the tsunami swept their little boy away. Attending an art opening, they see a grainy film of Burmese children left to fend for themselves in abandoned jungle outposts and Jeanne sees her son among them. While the image is never clear (the child is hobbling away from the camera), Jeanne is convinced and immediately plunges into the Bangkok night, a riot of neon and prostitution, to find a human smuggler who can take her to where the film was shot. Led by Thaksin Gao (played by the affable and afroed Petch Osathanugrah), Paul and Jeanne sail into war -torn Burma to find the "white child" in the country's fog, mud, and forest. Of course, that's when things get bizarre, and the film spins out leisurely towards a mind-boggling conclusion.

Continue reading: Vinyan Review

Rufus Sewell - Saturday 20th September 2008 at BAFTA Los Angeles, California

Rufus Sewell
Rufus Sewell and Saffron Burrows
Rufus Sewell
Rufus Sewell and Saffron Burrows

Dark City Review


Extraordinary
For all of the acclaim Dark City received after its initial, disastrous theatrical release in 1998 -- movie-of-the-year and DVD commentary honors from Roger Ebert; cult adoration; an eventual director's cut -- it probably still hasn't reached anywhere close to the number of people who saw, say, The Matrix (released just about a year later). Perhaps this has to do with the way the film shrouds its ideas in noir mystery rather than cyberpunk fashion; if The Matrix turned a broad audience into geeks who wanted to know kung fu, Dark City seemed ready-made for those whose geekery was established, though the film is broad enough to welcome nerds of the film, sci-fi, and perhaps even architecture varieties.

The Matrix is not a random comparison, mind you; the two films toy with similar ideas about the meaning of humanity, memory, and self-perception (they also share a second-unit director, though unless he is a brilliant stealth screenwriter, it is probably a coincidence). Dark City, directed by Alex Proyas, is less thrilling and sleek than its cousin, but equally imaginative, full of twisty images and clever synthesis of the movies that inspired it. It gives geeks a good name.

Continue reading: Dark City Review

Dark City Review


Extraordinary
For all of the acclaim Dark City received after its initial, disastrous theatrical release in 1998 -- movie-of-the-year and DVD commentary honors from Roger Ebert; cult adoration; an eventual director's cut -- it probably still hasn't reached anywhere close to the number of people who saw, say, The Matrix (released just about a year later). Perhaps this has to do with the way the film shrouds its ideas in noir mystery rather than cyberpunk fashion; if The Matrix turned a broad audience into geeks who wanted to know kung fu, Dark City seemed ready-made for those whose geekery was established, though the film is broad enough to welcome nerds of the film, sci-fi, and perhaps even architecture varieties.

The Matrix is not a random comparison, mind you; the two films toy with similar ideas about the meaning of humanity, memory, and self-perception (they also share a second-unit director, though unless he is a brilliant stealth screenwriter, it is probably a coincidence). Dark City, directed by Alex Proyas, is less thrilling and sleek than its cousin, but equally imaginative, full of twisty images and clever synthesis of the movies that inspired it. It gives geeks a good name.

Continue reading: Dark City Review

John Adams Review


Excellent
The mammoth success of David McCullough's John Adams (2001) was one of publishing's great shockers. How could a lengthy hardcover about America's least glamorous founding father sell so many copies?

It wasn't the Pulitzer that moved units. It was McCullough's storytelling which transformed Adams' life from a forgotten textbook paragraph to something deserving of a big-budget, seven-part HBO epic.

Continue reading: John Adams Review

Paris, Je T'aime Review


Good
One would like to think that there at least a few other cities in the world besides Paris that could have inspired a film as varied in the types of cinematic pleasure so ably delivered by the anthology piece Paris Je T'Aime -- but it seems unlikely. This isn't due to an unavailability of good stories or locations in many other great metropolises, but more because being able to dangle the possibility of shooting in Paris in front of the world's greatest directors is going to be so much more enticing. Also, there are few other cities besides Paris that come with such a powerful and multifarious wealth of preassociated images and emotions for both filmmaker and audience to both draw upon and react against. So what could have been a collection of short films with a few highs, several lows, and a lot of muddled in-betweens is in fact a remarkably and consistently imaginative body of work, practically giddy with energy, that only rarely touches the ground.

Project overseers Emmanuel Benbihy and Tristan Carné wanted to create a cinematic map of Paris, with each short film representing one of the city's 20 arrondissements (neighborhoods). They ended up with 18 films, none of them more than a few minutes long and directed by a glittering, international roster of filmmakers. While none of the films here are anything approaching masterpieces, hardly a one is in any way a chore to sit through, which has to be some sort of an accomplishment.

Continue reading: Paris, Je T'aime Review

Amazing Grace Review


Very Good
For a film with all the stylistic panache of a BBC period yawner and all the moral ambiguity of an after-school special, Amazing Grace is a surprisingly entertaining political drama. It tells the story of famed British abolitionist William Wilberforce's struggle to end the slave trade in England. Its high-minded earnestness and longsuffering main character will remind movie buffs of another cinematic treatment of British history, A Man for All Seasons, but it's another similarity shared by these two films that sets Amazing Grace apart from all but a few mainstream movies being made today. Amazing Grace, like A Man for All Seasons, is a serious film about religious conviction and the power of individual believers to effect change in a world in need of redemption.

Make no mistake: Amazing Grace is not a complex movie. The good guys are good and the bad guys aren't so much bad as they are yet to become good. Such a simple and optimistic moral vision may seem antiquated to some, but Amazing Grace doesn't apologize for its old-fashioned piety. As the action starts, Wilberforce (Ioan Gruffudd) undergoes a religious conversion. His long-abandoned childhood faith has once again stirred his heart and moved him to commit to doing whatever he can to improve the world. Already a member of Parliament, he asks several of his friends -- including the clergyman John Newton (Albert Finney), who wrote the hymn "Amazing Grace" -- if he should continue his political career or move on to a more spiritual pursuit. At all of his friends' urging, Wilberforce chooses politics and not long after takes an unpopular stand on the issue that will dominate his political career thereafter: the slave trade.

Continue reading: Amazing Grace Review

The Illusionist Review


Weak
There's something in Paul Giamatti that was just made for the 19th century. With those slightly bulbous but penetrating eyes and stolid weariness, one can imagine him looking out of an old daguerreotype with hat in hand, an emblem of a less superficial age. So it's nice to see Giamatti (so often made to play the whiny comic relief) cast in the otherwise dismissible film The Illusionist as a gruff policeman in fin de siècle Vienna, dropping his voice into a lower register than usual and assuming an impressive stature; honorable but shaded with a tiny bit of incipient corruption. If only everything else in the film worked this well.

Based on a short story by Steven Millhauser, a Pulitzer winner given to tidy exposition and nostalgic settings, The Illusionist concerns a stage magician who was separated from the love of his love due to his peasant roots and her aristocratic family, only to meet her years later on stage, when she is betrothed to a villainous crown prince. The magician, Eisenheim, is played stiffly by Edward Norton, without a shred of humor or self-awareness. Somewhat in keeping with his performance is that by Jessica Biel as his beloved, Sophie von Teschen -- whose beauty helps brighten these lamp-lit rooms, but who is never close to believable as a Viennese noblewoman. Rather more in keeping with the spirit of the rather melodramatic story is Rufus Sewell, as the evil Crown Prince Leopold, who swans through the film with cigarette holder perched lightly in one hand, his face a deliciously, maliciously bored mask.

Continue reading: The Illusionist Review

The Holiday Review


Good
Nancy Meyers officially displaces Sleepless in Seattle director Nora Ephron as the crown-wearing queen of winsome, middle-concept romantic comedies.

Granted, the writer-director has been staffing a cache of headstrong and heartfelt female characters since she penned Private Benjamin in 1980. But it's the back-to-back-to-back musings of What Women Want, Something's Gotta Give, and her current affair The Holiday that elevate her to the summit of palatable sap.

Continue reading: The Holiday Review

Tristan & Isolde Review


Excellent
Kevin Reynolds is one of Hollywood's most unjustly maligned filmmakers. I'm frequently astounded by the fact that his superior craftsmanship is not more widely recognized. Surely his attention to detail and sensual prowess is equal that of championed filmmakers like Ridley and Tony Scott (who both produced this film).

I suspect that most of this disregard is due to the fact that more often than not Reynolds' films are burdened with clunky and sentimental scripts. Films like Rapa Nui and Robin Hood: Prince of Thieves were gorgeously shot and produced but weighed down by melodrama and hobbled by sentimentality. And then there was the whole Waterworld debacle from which it seems Reynolds has never really recovered. The Count of Monte Cristo was a start, but this is the film that should bring Reynolds back to the table. (I happen to think Waterworld is fantastically accomplished and enormously entertaining but don't tell anyone I said that.)

Continue reading: Tristan & Isolde Review

The Legend Of Zorro Review


Good
The Legend of Zorro is sure to please those who dug the fancy swordplay and acrobatics of The Mask of Zorro. For those who enjoyed the 1998 summer hit for the romantic byplay between co-stars Antonio Banderas and then-unknown Catherine Zeta-Jones -- as well as the sheer absurdity of Anthony Hopkins playing a Hispanic -- well the recently released special edition DVD will do just nicely.

The sequel picks up 10 years later in 1850, where lovers Alejandro (Banderas) and Elena (Zeta-Jones, again convincing everyone she's not European) are now married. Alejandro is still working around the clock as Zorro to help the oppressed of California, a situation Elena is none too pleased with since she feels he's neglecting his family. After an especially nasty argument with Elena, Alejandro leaves his estate to get some space and to save some more peasant families. Several days later, he's handed divorce papers and a reason to start drinking.

Continue reading: The Legend Of Zorro Review

Extreme Ops Review


Terrible
You know how somehow, God knows why, every movie is somebody's favorite movie. It could be the worst movie in the world, full of bad jokes, a cheesy script, and unexciting action, and you'll eventually run into someone who loves the piece of crap to death. Know what I'm talking about? Well that's never going to happen to Extreme Ops.

It's not that Extreme Ops is just a bad movie... if you go by the books it isn't the worst it can be. It's that the movie, despite being about stunts, terrorists, sex, and extreme sports, doesn't have enough energy to turn on a light bulb. Extreme Ops has all the power of a Tide commercial. It has all the chemistry of a vat of acid. It has all the excitement of eating oatmeal. Extreme Ops is so slow it's the antidote to amphetamines.

Continue reading: Extreme Ops Review

Cold Comfort Farm Review


Excellent
Clever and funny English country dramady about an orphan (Beckinsale, in a radiant debut that has gone downhill ever since), who is sent to live with her insane relatives on Cold Comfort Farm. Grows better with each viewing.

Illuminata Review


Weak
The art of acting is fascinating and mysterious, even for the actors who practice it. Unfortunately, for many artists, acting is too fascinating, and they can't resist the temptation to over-analyze it and to make plays/films about it. Playwright Brandon Cole and actor-director John Turturro, creators of Illuminata, are the latest to succumb.

Turturro plays a dramatist, Tuccio, struggling to make his name in the Manhattan theater scene at the turn of the century. Tuccio uses the unexpected illness of an actor (played by Matthew Sussman) to convince the owners of a Manhattan theater to chance his play, Illuminata. Unfortunately, that is not only the movie's premise, but also most of the plot.

Continue reading: Illuminata Review

A Knight's Tale Review


Good

By now you've heard about the concept of "A Knight's Tale" and had the time to become justifiably dubious. A 14th Century jousting adventure set to the tune of guitar rock stadium anthems? How could that possibly be anything short of laughable?

The answer is -- well, I don't know exactly. But when, five minutes into the movie, a crowd of peasants at a jousting tournament starts stomping feet in time and bellowing "We will/We will/Rock You!" (and soon thereafter do "the wave"), I defy you not to grin an aw-what-the-heck grin and go along for the ride.

The story itself isn't much more than a dressed-up, time-warped sports underdog yarn, in which the lowborn hero ("The Patriot's" jaunty Heath Ledger) poses as a knight (only those of noble birth are allowed to compete) and becomes the toast of the jousting world. But in the hands of writer-director Brian Helgeland (who helmed "Payback" and co-wrote "L.A. Confidential"), the movie's cliché-spawn chassis is merely a jumping-off point for a jocular, undeflatable, high energy theme-park ride of action, wisecracks and romance.

Continue reading: A Knight's Tale Review

Rufus Sewell

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Rufus Sewell

Date of birth

29th October, 1967

Occupation

Actor

Sex

Male

Height

1.83


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Rufus Sewell Movies

Blinky Bill The Movie Trailer

Blinky Bill The Movie Trailer

Blinky Bill has always considered himself an explorer, the kind of Koala that's willing to...

Gods of Egypt Movie Review

Gods of Egypt Movie Review

With a massive scale and a digital cast of thousands, this ancient Egyptian romp tries...

Gods Of Egypt Trailer

Gods Of Egypt Trailer

When Set brutally murderers his brother, Osiris the great deities of ancient Egypt are upset,...

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Hercules Movie Review

Hercules Movie Review

Far more entertaining than it has any right to be, this is a big, messy...

Hercules Trailer

Hercules Trailer

Following his deadly ordeal of being put through the Twelve Labours by his father Zeus...

The Sea Trailer

The Sea Trailer

Max Morden is an art historian who's determined to re-discover his own history following the...

Hercules - Trailer Trailer

Hercules - Trailer Trailer

Hercules is a bitter and haunted demi-god filled with resentment for the people and the...

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All Things to All Men Movie Review

All Things to All Men Movie Review

Sadly, there has been such a glut of gun-packed London crime thrillers, that it simply...

Abraham Lincoln: Vampire Hunter Movie Review

Abraham Lincoln: Vampire Hunter Movie Review

A riotous combination of rah-rah American patriotism and overwrought special effects nonsense, this cheeky bit...

Abraham Lincoln: Vampire Hunter Trailer

Abraham Lincoln: Vampire Hunter Trailer

As a boy, Abraham Lincoln learns from his father, Thomas, that vampires are real. Worse...

The Tourist Movie Review

The Tourist Movie Review

This is a thoroughly offbeat concoction from the gifted filmmaker behind the acclaimed The Lives...

The Tourist Trailer

The Tourist Trailer

Most people wouldn't travel to Venice Italy - considered by many to be one of...

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