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The Choice Trailer


Gabby Holland is the latest resident to join a quiet bay side community, her neighbour is a young single man, Travis, who lives with his dog. When Gabby finds out that her dog is pregnant and Travis' dog is the likely culprit, their worlds are thrown together.

Though Gabby has little time for Travis she feels an attraction to him, even though she's in a relationship with a smart and more than adequate match. This is a beginning to their intense love affair. As time goes by, their relationship is far from straightforward but the two still have an obvious mental and physical connection. After a serious car accident their relationship is tested to the limit and Travis must make some choices that will affect both their lives forever.

The Choice is the latest of Nicholas Sparks' film to be made into a film. Some of his more successful novels that have been turned into films include: The Notebook, Dear John, A Walk to Remember and The Lucky One.

Continue: The Choice Trailer

Los Angeles Premiere Of 'Adult Beginners'

Ross Katz - Shots from the Los Angeles premiere of the comedy, drama film 'Adult Beginners' which was attended by a host of stars at the ArcLight in Hollywood, California, United States - Wednesday 15th April 2015

Ross Katz
Ross Katz
Ross Katz
Ross Katz

Adult Beginners Trailer


On the day of his new company's big launch, and young and successful entrepreneur suffers, and pays the price for his hubris. Jake (Nick Kroll) loses everything; not only his money, but also the money of a lot of other people. Forced to move in with his pregnant sister, Justine (Rose Byrne), and her husband, Danny (Bobby Cannavale), for around three months, Jake takes to baby-sitting, and has to learn to love his family once again. In the process of raising a child, Jake, Justine and Danny are all forced to grow up a little themselves. 

Continue: Adult Beginners Trailer

Taking Chance Review


Excellent
Military reverence has long been one of the classic movie themes, to the point that it is now one of the most frequently mishandled subjects. It is difficult to make a soldier movie that avoids formulaic sentimentality and traditional heroism to the sound of a bugle call. Even more difficult is to make a military film that uncovers something most audiences have never seen, to open viewers up to the intimate unknown. Taking Chance successfully does both; it dissects minute military details that take place far away from the battlefield and exposes us to procedures that both fascinate and enlighten. It is quiet, engaging, and surprisingly affecting.

The film is unique in its keen attention to the minutiae of the U.S. military's body transfer process. Taking Chance is almost exclusively interested in the power of ambiguous observation. Sure, there is a story with a beginning, middle, and end, but narrative isn't necessarily the film's foremost preoccupation; this is a movie that thrives on intimate characterization and quiet scrutiny.

Continue reading: Taking Chance Review

Marie Antoinette Review


Very Good
The word "soft" summarizes the world of Sofia Coppola, perfectly. Each film she has made has the tenderness, vagueness and, ultimately, the sensibility of a fluffy, white cloud in the middle of a blue sky. With two near-perfect films on her resume, 1999's The Virgin Suicides and 2003's majestic Lost in Translation, Sofia Coppola's third film should have been an easy play. Instead, we are given the beguiling Marie Antoinette.

There's the famous Marie-Antoinette (Kirsten Dunst): the one who so insipidly said "Let them eat cake" when learning of the famine and starvation of the French people and the one who had her head cut off and displayed, with ample delight, to the same people she told to eat said cake. Then there's the private Marie Antoinette: the one who was forced into a French marriage (she was Austrian originally) by her brutish mother and who would eventually lose a newborn baby right as her kingdom was crashing down. Coppola seems very confused as to whom she wants to show in Marie Antoinette.

Continue reading: Marie Antoinette Review

Marie Antoinette Review


Very Good
The word "soft" summarizes the world of Sofia Coppola, perfectly. Each film she has made has the tenderness, vagueness and, ultimately, the sensibility of a fluffy, white cloud in the middle of a blue sky. With two near-perfect films on her resume, 1999's The Virgin Suicides and 2003's majestic Lost in Translation, Sofia Coppola's third film should have been an easy play. Instead, we are given the beguiling Marie Antoinette.

There's the famous Marie-Antoinette (Kirsten Dunst): the one who so insipidly said "Let them eat cake" when learning of the famine and starvation of the French people and the one who had her head cut off and displayed, with ample delight, to the same people she told to eat said cake. Then there's the private Marie Antoinette: the one who was forced into a French marriage (she was Austrian originally) by her brutish mother and who would eventually lose a newborn baby right as her kingdom was crashing down. Coppola seems very confused as to whom she wants to show in Marie Antoinette.

Continue reading: Marie Antoinette Review

Trick Review


OK
A for effort. C- for implementation. Trick tries hard, really hard, to be a queer version of a Doris Day/Rock Hudson comedy (before any realized those were queer versions of themselves). Christian Campbell makes one of the most earnest playwrite-in-search-of-meaning-and-love characters you're going to see, but Pitoc's "Mike" is as dull as his character name. Spelling livens up the proceedings for awhile, but eventually this film just gets tiresome and mushy. At all of 90 minutes, it's not bad enough to make you give up on it, but greatness is not a word that comes to mind.

Lost In Translation Review


Very Good
While filmmakers like Brian De Palma and Neil Jordan have escaped to France to make labors of love, Sofia Coppola (The Virgin Suicides) chose Japan. Two characters working through transitions in their lives while stuck in foreign environs rejoice in a quickly bonded friendship. A pleasantly simple story, matched with fine performances by Bill Murray and Scarlett Johansson, topped off with stunning cinematography that allows the setting to mingle with those who inhabit it.

The recently wed Charlotte (Johansson) lazes around her hotel room, waiting for her photographer husband (Giovanni Ribisi) to return from another crazy day of shooting. She spends some of her days wandering into cultural parks and entertainment, but finds herself stifled by a lack of direction. Her path converges with Bob (Bill Murray), a famous actor from America who is stuck in filming commercials because the money is just too darn good to turn down. Both are experiencing an estrangement from their spouses and get caught in reflection of where they are headed, leading to a powerful camaraderie that seeks enjoyment and solace.

Continue reading: Lost In Translation Review

In The Bedroom Review


Excellent
In the Bedroom is an immensely powerful motion picture that presents a small New England town in its trademark tranquility... until tragedy strikes and disrupts the folksy setting. Actor-turned-director Todd Field delivers a penetrating feature (in his mainstream debut) that suggests he has a knack for helming solid, gripping heartfelt stories that are shocking and uniquely absorbing. In the Bedroom is an eloquent and sobering drama that intensifies beyond expectation. Ambitious and convincingly involving, this film is one of the most memorable offerings of the year. Well-acted and beautifully crafted, In the Bedroom is an emotionally haunting tale that provokes the senses.

The film takes place in a small Maine community called Camden. Here, it's not all that uncommon to see chipped wooden houses on every other corner or sleepy-eyed churches that feature old rusty bells hanging in the steeple. The aura of small-town life is apparent and could pass for a Norman Rockwell painting. Among this quaint town's residents are a prototypical middle-aged couple named Matt and Ruth Fowler (Tom Wilkinson and Sissy Spacek). Matt is a distinguished physician and native Mainer. New Yorker Ruth is a high school choral music teacher who enjoys her occupation. The Fowlers have one child named Frank (Nick Stahl), a college graduate student studying architecture, who has returned home for the summer while working as a lobsterman to earn some extra money.

Continue reading: In The Bedroom Review

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Ross Katz Movies

The Choice Trailer

The Choice Trailer

Gabby Holland is the latest resident to join a quiet bay side community, her neighbour...

Adult Beginners Trailer

Adult Beginners Trailer

On the day of his new company's big launch, and young and successful entrepreneur suffers,...

Marie Antoinette Movie Review

Marie Antoinette Movie Review

The word "soft" summarizes the world of Sofia Coppola, perfectly. Each film she has made...

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Marie Antoinette Movie Review

Marie Antoinette Movie Review

The word "soft" summarizes the world of Sofia Coppola, perfectly. Each film she has made...

Lost in Translation Movie Review

Lost in Translation Movie Review

While filmmakers like Brian De Palma and Neil Jordan have escaped to France to make...

In the Bedroom Movie Review

In the Bedroom Movie Review

In the Bedroom is an immensely powerful motion picture that presents a small New England...

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